Croquet England Logo
Croquet England Logo

Regulations for Tournaments 2024

toggle Contents... -

These Tournament Regulations have been approved by the Croquet England Executive on 25 January 2024, and are effective from 1 February 2024. The addition of AC Laws Variation L6, to amend the law relating to playing out of sequence in alternate stroke doubles, was approved on 27 June 2024, to take effect from 1 July 2024.

Contents

I. INTRODUCTION

C. CLUBS AND OTHER TOURNAMENT ORGANISERS
C1 Calendar Fixtures
C2 Tournament Programme
C3 Procedures for Dealing with Entries

F. FORMATS FOR EVENTS
F1 Knockout Events
F2 All-Play-All (American) Block Events
F3 Swiss Events
F4 Progressive Swiss Events
F5 Flexible Swiss Events
F6 Egyptian Events
F7 Class Events
F8 Incomplete or Unfinished Games

H. HANDICAPS
H1 Handicaps
H2 The Tournament Handicapper
H3 Short Croquet

L. APPROVED LAWS / RULES VARIATIONS
L1 Optional Laws/Rules (AC and GC)
L2 Forestalling Wrong Ball Play when Observing a Game (GC)
L3 One-Ball - Handicap Play (AC)
L4 Trial Use of Video to Support Refereeing (AC and GC)
L5 Handicaps for Doubles Advantage Play (GC)
L6 Playing Out of Sequence in Alternate Stroke Doubles (AC)

M. THE TOURNAMENT MANAGER
M1 Duties of the Tournament Manager
M2 Powers of the Tournament Manager

O. OFFICIALS
O1 Appointment
O2 Powers and Duties
O3 Appeals Committee
O4 Tournament Director

P. PLAYERS
P1 Eligibility to Compete in Calendar Fixtures
P2 Conduct
P3 Entries
P4 Conditions of Play
P5 Handicaps
P6 Trophies

R. REFEREES

T. TIME LIMITS
T1 Permitted Time Limits
T2 Limit on Number of Turns
T3 Golf Croquet

APPENDIX 1 - Hoop Setting and Inspection Requirements
APPENDIX 2 - Croquet England Trophies
APPENDIX 3 - Example of the Use of Matchpoints to Resolve Incomplete Blocks
APPENDIX 4 - Example of the Resolution of Ties ('Who beat Whom') in Complete Blocks


Changes since the Previous Version

The changes of substance made since the 2023 edition are as follows:

Many other changes have been made for clarity or to remove typographic or formatting errors, but without any change of intent. These include:

Notice of proposed changes for the 2025 season


I. Introduction

  1. JURISDICTION.
    1. Croquet England and the governing bodies of croquet in Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America have agreed that for tournaments held within their respective jurisdictions, Tournament Regulations are a domestic matter for the governing body concerned.
    2. These Regulations take precedence over any extracts of Regulations printed elsewhere, including over previous editions of these Regulations, which are available for reference in the Tournament Regulations Historic Index.
  2. TERMINOLOGY.
    1. A tournament or other event advertised in the online Fixtures Calendar is referred to as a 'Calendar Fixture'.
    2. The club or other body responsible for a Calendar Fixture is referred to as the 'Organising Body'.
    3. 'Croquet England Fixtures' are those organised by Croquet England, with the assistance of host clubs, and for which Croquet England (acting through the relevant Tournaments Committee) is the Organising Body.
    4. The initials 'AC' and 'GC' shall be taken to read Association Croquet or Golf Croquet as appropriate.
    5. Except when indicated to the contrary, 'Dynamic Grade' refers to a player's most recent Dynamic Grade as shown in the Player Full Record of the AC or GC (as appropriate) World Ranking System. Note that the Player Full Record displays a players latest Dynamic Grade, with no minimum game or minimum grade requirement. Details about the World Rankings can be found on the WCF website.
    6. A Subscriber means an individual member or associate of Croquet England.
  3. SCOPE.
    1. These Regulations shall apply in all Calendar Fixtures, together with any conditions consistent with them which are specifically published for a particular tournament or event.
    2. These Regulations apply to both Association and Golf Croquet, except when indicated to the contrary.
    3. Variations to Regulations C3 (Procedures for Dealing with Entries), F (Formats for Events), L (Approved Laws/Rules Variations), P4 (Conditions of Play), and T (Time Limits) may be included within the Special Conditions or Event Conditions of any Calendar Fixture. Otherwise, variations may be introduced only in accordance with these Regulations (for example, as described in Regulation M2(c))
  4. LAWS/RULES. Games shall, subject to the authorised variations in Regulation L and international or Croquet England rulings, be played under the latest edition of one of the following sets of Laws or Rules:
    1. for Association Croquet, the current Laws of Association Croquet as published by Croquet England, together with any official rulings; or
    2. for Golf Croquet, the current Rules of Golf Croquet as published by Croquet England.

C. Clubs and Other Tournament Organisers

C1 Calendar Fixtures

  1. REQUIREMENTS. The following are eligible to be Calendar Fixtures, subject to payment of whatever fees are appropriate and agreement to comply with Croquet England Policies (including, but not limited to, Safeguarding and Welfare):
    1. Events run by Croquet England Affiliate Clubs or Federations under these Regulations and with entry not restricted to members of the host club.
    2. Events organised by Croquet England.
    3. Events in which Croquet England selects participants (such as a World Championship).
    4. Coaching events (see (d) below).
    5. Charity events run by Croquet England Affiliate Clubs or Federations (for which the Levy is waived; see also Regulation C2(b)(7)).
    6. Other events explicitly approved by the relevant Tournaments Committee, for which a fee might be applicable in addition to, or instead of, the Croquet England Tournament Levy (such as an event taking place outside Croquet England's domain).
  2. REQUIREMENTS FOR TOURNAMENTS. If a tournament is to appear as a Calendar Fixture, the Organising Body must:
    1. Submit, by the date determined by the Croquet England Operations Manager, the proposed dates of the tournament.
    2. Send, by the date determined by the Croquet England Operations Manager, a tournament programme that complies with Regulation C2.
    3. Provide standard or modified courts laid out and equipped in accordance with the [AC: Laws] [GC: Rules], with hoops set to the standard specified in Appendix 1. [GC: For Championships, cord boundaries are not to be used.]
    4. Provide balls of identical manufacture and type. The diameters of all balls used on a court may differ by no more than 1/32" for Championships or 1/16" otherwise. Balls used in Championships should have Championship Approval from the Equipment Committee. See C2(b)(5) for the definition of a Championship.
    5. Agree with the Tournament Manager the maximum number of entries that the capacity of the courts available will allow.
    6. Process entries according to Regulation C3.
    7. Include in the entry fee for each event the Croquet England Tournament Levy.
      1. Levy is payable to Croquet England by all competitors in Fixtures Calendar listed Tournaments of more than one day's duration and is included in the entry fee charged.
      2. The standard rate of levy is £7 per player per Calendar Fixture, except that the rate is zero for Under-25 Premium Members.
      3. Players who are not Croquet England Premium Subscribers pay an additional levy, through their entry fee, of £7 (£3.50 Under-25) per scheduled day for each event (other than one-day Tournaments). Premium Subscribers include Overseas and Under-25 categories, and overseas players claiming reciprocal rights through the World Croquet Federation.
    8. Unless otherwise stated, provide lunches and teas (the Organising Body may charge for this).
    9. Unless otherwise stated, make players honorary members of the host club for the duration of the tournament.
  3. REQUIREMENTS FOR RETURNS FROM TOURNAMENTS. The Organising Body must arrange to send to the office as soon as possible after the tournament:
    1. the full results of the tournament in the form notified by Croquet England (send a copy to results#croquet.org.uk).
    2. an account and payment of the total sum of Levy due, unless the tournament is in the on-line entry system in which case the on-line record must be updated if necessary to ensure that it correctly records the people that played.
    3. any tournament report (send a copy to news#croquet.org.uk).
    4. receipt forms for any Croquet England Trophies taken by the holder.
    5. details of any incidents alleged or dealt with under Regulations P2, P3(h), P5(b), P6(b), M2(g), or the most serious actions, such as disqualification, by a Referee under [AC Law 63.2] [GC Rule 16.4]. (These are for the attention of the Croquet England Complaints Administrator.)
  4. REQUIREMENTS FOR COACHING EVENTS. Croquet England welcomes the inclusion of Academy and Club Coaching Courses in the Fixtures Calendar as consistent with the Croquet England strategy of supporting competitive croquet by improving players' skills and increasing the number of competitive players. Clubs, Federations and Academies must ensure such courses meet the following criteria:
    1. They must be croquet-related.
    2. They must be led by a competent person, defined as follows.
      1. For courses on croquet playing techniques or tactics:
        • A Croquet England Qualified Coach with the relevant qualification for the course being run (i.e. Grade 1, etc.); or
        • A widely-acknowledged expert in the particular subject matter who has teaching experience relevant to the style of the course. In this case, the course must be called a Masterclass or Workshop.
      2. For a Coach Training Course: an Examining Coach, who must adhere to the Coach Training Process. The official list of Examining Coaches is available within the Croquet England Directory and can be viewed by authorised individuals
      3. For a Referee Training Course: an Examining Referee for the relevant code, who must adhere to the Refereeing Training Process. The official list of Examining Referees is available within the Croquet England Directory and can be viewed by authorised individuals.
      4. For other courses (such as how to manage a tournament, or sports psychology applied to croquet): an acknowledged expert in the subject matter who has teaching experience relevant to the style of the course. Such a course must not be called a coaching course.
    3. Attendees must be requested to complete a feedback form, and a summary report sent to the office and the Chair of the Coaching Committee within 14 days of the end of the course.

C2 Tournament Programme

  1. CONTENTS. A tournament programme must give the following information:
    1. The dates and venue of the tournament.
    2. The nature of each event, any qualifications or restrictions (including handicap or grading) and the entry fee (inclusive of Levy).
    3. Notice of any seeding (see Regulation F1(a)).
    4. Notice of any authorised variations (see Regulation M1(j)).
    5. The dimensions of any modified courts.
    6. The type of ball to be used.
    7. The width of the hoops if not as in Appendix 1.
    8. The time play will begin on the first day.
    9. The Allocation Date: the date before which entries must be received by the Tournament Secretary for inclusion in the initial allocation of places. The Allocation Date is recommended to be 4 weeks before the event for Championship events and 8 weeks for others.
    10. The Closing Date: the date on or before which entries must be received by the Tournament Secretary for inclusion in the list of entries passed to the Tournament Manager. The Closing Date is recommended to be 2 weeks before the event.
    11. The Draw Date (if known): the date on which the draw will be conducted, and published as soon as practicable thereafter.
    12. The names of the Tournament Manager, Tournament Referee and Tournament Handicapper (if known) and the name and address of the Tournament Secretary.
  2. TITLES FOR EVENTS. In order that the names of events run are consistent and entrants understand the significance of the titles, the following definitions will apply. Variations (e.g. "Euro" "European" are considered equivalent. Exceptions will be considered where there is a historical justification, for example when the term "Championship" is used within the name of a long-standing trophy. In all cases entries are processed in accordance with Regulation C3.
    1. WORLD. This word must only be used when the tournament is organised by the World Croquet Federation in the Croquet England domain with the assistance of Croquet England.
    2. EUROPEAN. This word must only be used for European events organised by the European Croquet Federation. Normally these will have a major input from Croquet England and the host club.
    3. BRITISH, Britain, United Kingdom, UK or other variants and other international regions. These words are reserved for events with agreement of the Board of Trustees and any national association(s) recognised by the World Croquet Federation for the areas concerned.
    4. ENGLISH, England or other variants. These words are reserved for national events, and is subject to the approval by the Executive.
    5. CHAMPIONSHIP. Permission to use this designation must be obtained from the relevant Tournaments Committee. Grades of Singles and Doubles Championships (team championships are not graded) are as follows:
      1. GRADE 3. These are [GC: Level Play] [AC: Level Advanced Play or Level Super-Advanced Play] events organised or approved by Croquet England. They will typically be a best-of-3 (or more) knockout or draw and process, possibly preceded by qualifying rounds in the form of blocks or a Swiss, but alternative formats may be proposed to reflect the size or playing standard of the likely entry. Entries may be restricted to a specific demographic, for example by age, gender or educational status.
      2. GRADE 2. As Grade 3, but additionally will use hoops set to Championship standards. Alternative formats are not permitted. If qualifying rounds are used, the knockout stage must contain at least four players/pairs. The knockout may be seeded by any method listed in Regulation F1(a)(3). The only permitted restriction on entries is by gender.
      3. GRADE 1. As Grade 2; these are Croquet England's top-level Championships.
    6. OPEN. Tournaments containing this word must be Level Play and have no restriction on entry other than as provided for in Regulations P1 and C3.
    7. FIRST-CLASS EVENTS. A First-Class event is an event played under the conditions of [AC: Level Advanced Play or Level Super-Advanced Play] [GC: Level Play], with unrestricted entry except for:
      1. restrictions by gender or non-Subscribers;
      2. restrictions excluding players with handicaps over a stated level or Dynamic Grade below a stated level; or
      3. other restrictions approved by Croquet England.
    8. CHARITY. Permission to use this designation must be obtained from the relevant Tournaments Committee. At least 75% of the entry fee must go to the nominated Registered Charity, which must not be related to croquet. The Croquet England Levy is waived for such events. The Charity should be specified in the event conditions.
    9. FEDERATION. Permissions to use this designation must be obtained from the relevant Federation, which shall be named in the title of the event.
    10. ACADEMY. Permissions to use this designation must be obtained from the relevant Academy, which shall be named in the title of the event.
  3. ALTERATIONS. No alterations may be made to the tournament programme without the agreement of the Tournament Manager (see Regulations M2(c) and M2(d)).
  4. DOUBLE-BANKING. The expectation is that double-banking will be used.

C3 Procedures for Dealing with Entries

This regulation applies to Singles or Doubles events. Procedures for entries for team events should be defined by the tournament's special conditions. Separate conditions apply to Croquet England Selection events.

For Doubles events, a pair is considered to be a single entry for the purposes for this Regulation. This means, for example, that a pair would need to both be Under-25 to be considered for a Under-25 priority place (C3(a)(2)(B)), one player in a pair not having a Dynamic Grade means that the pair as a whole has no Dynamic Grade (C3(a)(4)), and that one player in a pair withdrawing means that the pair has withdrawn (C3(d)).

  1. ALLOCATION DATE. See C2(a)(9).
    1. Entries received before the Allocation Date should be held and considered together on, or as soon as possible after, that date.
    2. On the Allocation Date, if the number of entries then exceeds the number of places available, the entry is split into Priority Groups:
      1. PRIORITY GROUP 1: Places are reserved for the Tournament Manager, winners of trophies when the event was last held, two Under-25 Subscribers who would not otherwise be allocated a place, and any other groups identified in the tournament's or event's special conditions, in all cases subject to the entrants meeting any general restrictions (for example age or handicap).
      2. PRIORITY GROUP 2: Priority is then given to any entrant who is a Croquet England Subscriber. (A player who is a member of another WCF Association, is not resident in Croquet England's domain, and is visiting for no longer than one 60-day visit in a calendar year can claim reciprocal rights under WCF Statute 164. For the purpose of allocation of tournament places, such players are treated as Croquet England Associates for the duration of their visit.)
      3. PRIORITY GROUP 3: All other entrants.
    3. If no further criteria are specified in the tournament's or event's special conditions, then taking the entrants in each Priority Group in turn (starting with Priority Group 1):
      1. for a Championship event, places shall be allocated to those entrants with the highest Dynamic Grades at that date; or
      2. for a First-Class event, places shall be allocated either to those entrants with the highest Dynamic Grades at that date, or by ballot (note that the same method must be used for each Priority Group); or
      3. for any other event (which, for the avoidance of doubt, includes all handicap events), places shall be allocated by ballot.
      [GC: For this purpose, the Dynamic grade of a player who is not in their first or second calendar year of ranking games, and who has played fewer than 15 ranking games in the previous 12 months, and has also played fewer than 15 ranking games in the previous calendar year, shall be reduced by 30 points. A further reduction of 30 points shall be applied for each prior consecutive calendar year in which the player has not played 15 ranking games, up to a maximum of seven further consecutive calendar years or until the calendar year of the player's first ranking game, whichever is more recent. The maximum reduction under this regulation is 240 points.]
    4. If allocation is by Dynamic Grade, then entrants with no Dynamic Grade shall be allocated places (based on lowest handicap) only after all entrants with Dynamic Grades have been allocated places.
    5. If not oversubscribed at the Allocation Date, all the entries submitted should be accepted.
    6. Surplus entrants should be notified as soon as possible and placed on a reserve list in the order in which they would have been accepted if additional places had been available.
  2. CLOSING DATE. See C2(a)(10).
    1. Entries received on or before the Closing Date should be placed on a reserve list in order of receipt.
    2. If places are or become available, places should be allocated to entrants from the reserve list until the event is full or the Closing Date is reached.
    3. For doubles events, any players entering without a partner shall be paired at random and allocated any places remaining available when the Closing Date is reached.
  3. LATE ENTRIES. After the Closing Date, places should be allocated to entrants only with the agreement of the Tournament Manager, and a surcharge of 50% of the entry fee may be imposed.
  4. WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS.
    1. Entry fees must be refunded in full to unsuccessful applicants.
    2. If an entrant withdraws before the Closing Date, the entry fee should be refunded, less an administrative charge not exceeding £5 for each refund. An entrant who withdraws after the Closing Date is not entitled to a refund, and none will be made for fixtures organised by Croquet England.
    3. See Regulation P3(h) for withdrawals on or after the Draw Date.
  5. REFUSAL. An Organising Body may refuse an entry on grounds other than those of over-subscription or ineligibility but must, on request, give the reason(s) to the person refused.

F. Formats for Events

The following text is intended to apply to both Association and Golf Croquet events.

[GC: However, normal practice in most International and National Golf Croquet events has been to use blocks initially with one or more leading players from each block then either competing in a knockout or progressing to a National Championship final. This has been found to meet most needs in the Golf Croquet calendar, though the Tournament Manager may adopt one of the alternative formats described. For deciding the placings in blocks, the relevant paragraphs of Regulation F2 shall apply unless alternatives are published before the start of the tournament.]

F1 Knockout Events

  1. SEEDING IN LEVEL PLAY EVENTS.
    1. In a seeded draw, the seeds will be placed on the draw sheet in the positions indicated by the following sequence: 1, 16, 9, 8, 5, 12, 13, 4, 3, 14, 11, 6, 7, 10, 15, 2.
    2. Fewer seeds may be used as required, but the order of those used will be maintained. Seeds 1 and 2 must be in separate halves of the draw, 1 to 4 in separate quarters, 1 to 8 in separate eighths, and 1 to 16 in separate sixteenths. The byes are then allocated as per Regulation F1(c)(3).
    3. Identification of seeded players.
      1. Seeds should be identified based on the most up-to-date Dynamic Grades available at the time of the draw.
      2. After the first four seeds, the Tournament Manager may choose to treat groups of four seeds (e.g. 5-8, 9-12 or 13-16) equally and randomly place those players in the appropriate positions in the draw.
      3. If a knockout follows a block stage, block positions may be used instead of Dynamic Grades.
      4. Other methods to identify seeds, such as by committee, are permitted if this is stated in the Calendar Fixture conditions.
    4. Consecutive seeds can be deemed to be equal and drawn by lot into their respective positions.
  2. SEEDING IN OTHER EVENTS. In other events the draw may be adjusted only in order to avoid as far as possible an early meeting between:
    1. players from the same club; or
    2. close relatives; or
    3. players already drawn to meet in the first round of another event.
  3. SINGLE-LIFE EVENTS. Subject to (a) and (b) above, the draw is compiled as follows:
    1. Subtract the number of entries from the power of 2 (i.e. 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256) greater than or equal to the number of entries. This gives the number of byes.
    2. If seeding is to be used, place the seeds in the first round of the draw sheet in accordance with (a) above.
    3. Distribute the byes in the first round of the draw sheet as follows:
      1. If the number of byes is odd, one more bye is placed at the bottom than at the top (or vice versa, as determined by lot).
      2. If the number of byes is a multiple of 4 (i.e. 4, 8, 12, 16, etc.), half are placed at the top and half at the bottom.
      3. In all other cases (i.e. 2, 6, 10, 14, etc.), either (at the choice of the Tournament Manager, but consistently for an entire draw):
        1. half of the byes are placed at the top and half at the bottom [this will continue to ensure an even distribution of byes throughout the draw]; or
        2. two more byes are placed at the bottom than at the top (or vice versa, as determined by lot) [this will distribute byes approximately evenly, but in a way to ensure at most one 'hanging bye' (i.e. so that at most one player does not have a game that could be started immediately)].
      4. Within each half the byes may be distributed between the two quarters according to the same principle; similarly within each quarter between the two eighths, etc..
      5. Byes are placed on alternate rows of the draw sheet. When a bye appears to need to be placed in a position already occupied (by a seed), the bye is instead placed as if drawn against that seed.
      6. Byes can be omitted from a published draw sheet, with those players who are subsequently drawn against them promoted to the second round. This is a presentational change which does not affect the actual draw.
    4. The names of the players are then drawn at random and entered on the empty rows of the draw sheet in the order in which they are drawn, starting at the top.
    5. If a bona fide entry is omitted, the name of the player is inserted on the draw sheet at the position an additional name would occupy if the number of entries were one greater, and any necessary consequential adjustment is made. If there is more than one omission, or more than one possible position, the matter is decided by lot.
    6. If an entry is included in error, it is struck out and the draw remains valid. If the event has not yet started and it is practicable to do so, the Tournament Manager may instead decide to adjust or re-do the draw under Regulation M2(e).
  4. TWO-LIFE EVENTS (DRAW AND PROCESS).
    1. The knockout draw for the first life, known as the Draw, is made in accordance with (c) (Single-Life Events) above, except that clause (c)(3)(C)(ii) shall not apply.
    2. Each player (but not the byes) in the first round of the Draw is numbered sequentially in the order written on the draw sheet from top to bottom (not seed order); remaining numbers required to make the next power of two are byes (for example, in the case of an 11 player two-life event, positions 1-11 are taken in order from the Draw and positions 12-16 are allocated as byes).
    3. The knockout draw for the second life, known as the Process, is compiled as follows:
      1. Enter on a second draw sheet the appropriate series of numbers from the table set out below.
        Entries Process Order
        1 to 4   1 3 2 4
        5 to 8   1 5 3 7 2 6 4 8
        9 to 16   1 9 5 13 3 11 7 15 2 10 6 14 4 12 8 16
        17 to 32 1st 16 1 17 9 25 5 21 13 29 3 19 11 27 7 23 15 31
        2nd 16 2 18 10 26 6 22 14 30 4 20 12 28 8 24 16 32
        33 to 64 1st 16 1 33 17 49 9 41 25 57 5 37 21 53 13 45 29 61
        2nd 16 3 35 19 51 11 43 27 59 7 39 23 55 15 47 31 63
        3rd 16 2 34 18 50 10 42 26 58 6 38 22 54 14 46 30 62
        4th 16 4 36 20 52 12 44 28 60 8 40 24 56 16 48 32 64
      2. For 65 to 128 players, additional columns are generated by adding 64 to each number for "33 to 64" entries and insetting the result immediately to the right of that number.
      3. Next to each number is entered the name of the player next to that number in the Draw (as numbered in (d)(2) above); for each number higher than the number of players, 'Bye' is entered.
      4. Byes can be omitted from a published Process, with those players who are drawn against them promoted to the second round. This is a presentational change which does not affect the actual format.
    4. The winner of the Draw plays an extra match against the winner of the Process to decide the event winner. If the same player wins both halves of the event, the defeated finalists in the Draw and Process may play off for second place.
  5. TWO-LIFE VARIATIONS. These variations reduce a two-life event to a single-life event, so for a First-Class event (as defined in C2(b)(7)) advertised as two-life they may be introduced only in an emergency.
    1. VARIATION A. This is introduced when both lives have reached the semi-final stage and there are fewer than eight players involved. The draw is compiled on a draw sheet containing positions numbered from 1 to 8.
      1. 7 players: the player in both lives is placed in position 1 and receives a bye (i.e. position 2 is blank); the other players are drawn by lot to fill positions 3 to 8.
      2. 6 players: the two players in both lives are placed in positions 1 and 8 and receive byes (i.e. positions 2 and 7 are blank); the other players are drawn by lot to fill positions 3 to 6.
      3. 5 players: the three players in both lives are drawn by lot to fill positions 1, 3 and 8 and receive byes (i.e. positions 2, 4 and 7 are blank); the two remaining players are placed in positions 5 and 6.
      4. 4 players: all players are drawn by lot to occupy the four semi-final places.
    2. VARIATION B. This is introduced when both lives have reached the final stage and there are fewer than four players involved.
      1. 3 players: the player in both lives plays the winner of a game between the other two players.
      2. 2 players: they play each other once.
  6. XY AND XYZ EVENTS.
    1. THE X EVENT. The players are drawn in accordance with (c) above.
    2. THE Y EVENT. Players who lose their first match in the X enter the Y automatically in the same order as they were drawn in the X.
    3. THE Z EVENT (if played). Players who lose their second match in the X or their first match in the Y enter the Z automatically, but in any order the Tournament Manager thinks fit.
    4. Byes and, in XY events, walkovers do not count as wins. Competitors who scratch from the X or Y may not enter the Y or Z.

F2 All-Play-All (American) Block Events

  1. CONCEPT. An all-play-all (historically known as an American) block event is one in which the players are arranged into one or more blocks according to the conditions advertised for the event.
    1. Players are allocated to N blocks in accordance with A, B or C below:
      1. Players may be randomly allocated to blocks. Up to N-1 byes should be distributed between blocks to ensure the same number of 'players' in each block.
      2. If a fully seeded blocks are required, all players should be placed into descending seeding order. Seeds should be identified as set out in F1(a)(3) above. If byes are necessary, they should be placed at the end of the list. A zigzag pattern should be followed to distribute players between the blocks. The example below is based on placing 24 players in 4 blocks. The method is scalable to any number of blocks of arbitrary size.
        Block A Block B Block C Block D
        1 2 3 4
        8 7 6 5
        9 10 11 12
        16 15 14 13
        17 18 19 20
        24 23 22 21
      3. If preferred, the top multiple of N players may be seeded (in accordance with B) with the remainder (which should normally be the larger part of the entry) placed randomly (in accordance with A). Any required byes should be placed in accordance with A.
    2. Each block is then played independently of the others, except that a play-off between players from different blocks, arranged according to their final placings within their blocks, may follow.
    3. In each block, every player in the block is scheduled to play the other players in the block the same, pre-arranged, number of times. A single-series block is one in which each player is scheduled to meet each of the others once only; in a multiple-series block each player is scheduled to meet each of the others two or more times.
    4. Unless otherwise advertised in advance, or announced before the start of the event, the method of determining the final placings of players in an all-play-all block is described below.
  2. COMPLETE BLOCKS (ASSOCIATION CROQUET).
    1. Players are placed in descending order of the number of games they have won.
    2. Where two or more players are tied on an equal number of games won, and the tie must be resolved (e.g. for the purpose of awarding prize(s), a play-off between players in different blocks, or qualification for another event) but there is not time for a play-off, then the players in the tie are placed relative to each other in descending order of the number of games they have won in the games played between them. If necessary, this procedure may be repeated. (See Appendix 4 for a worked example.)
    3. If there is still a tie that needs to be resolved, Regulation M2(c)(6) shall be applied.
  3. COMPLETE BLOCKS (GOLF CROQUET).
    1. This regulation applies to Level and Extra Turn Handicap Play. See (g) below for Advantage Golf Croquet.
    2. A match shall be defined as a single contest between two players and can comprise either a single game or the best-of-3 or best-of-5 games. Where play in a block requires each player to play all of the others twice, each of these games will be regarded as a single-game match.
    3. Players are placed in descending order of the number of matches they have won. Where tied games are permitted, a tie shall be regarded as half a win. Tied games shall not be permitted in best-of-3 or best-of-5 matches.
    4. If there are two or more players with the same number of wins, placings shall be decided as follows:
      1. Only in the case of best-of-3 or best-of-5 matches, the group of players shall be separated by the net games won in all their matches in the block.
      2. Any group of players still tied shall be separated by net points across all the games they played in the block.
      3. Any group of players still tied shall be separated by the number of matches won in the matches played between those players. (See Appendix 4 for a worked example.)
      4. Only in the case of best-of-3 or best-of-5 matches, any group of players still tied shall be separated by the net games in the matches between those players. If this produces a partial resolution then the group or groups of players still needing to be separated shall be placed by returning to step 4C.
      5. Any group of players still tied shall be separated by the net points in the games between each of these players.
      6. If none of the above produces a result, Regulation M2(c)(6) shall be applied.
    5. Best Losers: On occasion, it may be that the number of players who are due to progress from the block stages of a tournament is not a multiple of the number of blocks. Where this is the case, the following method will be used to determine who goes through:
      1. An equal number of players from each block will progress automatically by virtue of their placings, so that the number of 'best losers' needed is fewer than the number of blocks. Only players who missed out in their blocks by one position will be considered for the purposes of determining the best losers.
      2. The players will first be separated by the percentage of matches won in their respective block.
      3. Any players still tied will be separated by the percentage of games won in their respective block.
      4. Any players still tied will be separated by the average net hoops per game they achieved in their respective block.
      5. Any players still tied will be separated by the average number of hoops they scored per game in their respective block.
      6. If none of the above produces a result, Regulation M2(c)(6) shall be applied.
  4. GENERAL TREATMENT OF INCOMPLETE BLOCKS. The validity of the block format depends on all the games being completed and on players making the same effort to win in each of their games; a wilful failure to do so is misconduct and Regulation M2(g) applies. Nevertheless, there will be circumstances, such as illness or weather, which prevent all the games scheduled being completed. (e) and (f) below describe how to deal with this, for single- and multiple-series blocks respectively.
  5. INCOMPLETE SINGLE-SERIES BLOCKS.
    1. Any player whose final placing under (b) above, had the block been completed, could be predicted to be the same whatever the outcome of the uncompleted games shall be given that placing.
    2. Any player for whom results are available for fewer than half of the largest number of games completed by any player in the block, or who has failed to win a game in the block, shall be treated as having withdrawn from the block. The results of any games played by that player shall be ignored for the purpose of deciding the remaining placings.
    3. Having applied (2) above, if results are available for all the games between the remaining players then (b) above is applied to determine the remaining placings not established under (1), as though the block had contained only those players.
    4. Otherwise, the remaining placings for the block are determined by a method of pairwise comparison, under which matchpoints are awarded to each player as follows, and are used to construct a matchpoint table, analogous to the American Block results table. Appendix 3 provides a worked example of the application of matchpoints, for further clarification.
      1. For each pair of players in the block the following comparison is performed:
        1. subject to (B) below, in comparing the available results of two players, only the results of the game played between them, and of their games against other players whom they both have played, shall be considered.
        2. if the results considered give both players equal numbers of wins, they are each awarded one matchpoint; otherwise, the player with the greater number of wins is awarded two matchpoints and the other player none.
      2. If a player has failed to start one or more games for reasons outside that player's control, the player shall be deemed to have played and lost them by the maximum margin, and that player's matchpoints (but not those of the player's opponents) shall be recalculated on that basis.
      3. A composite table is then constructed, in which each player is considered to have won the number of games they actually won, plus half the number of matchpoints awarded for the incomplete results. Players are placed in descending order of games won in this composite table, followed by descending order of the number of matchpoints awarded.
      4. Where two or more players are tied on an equal number of wins in this composite table, and the tie must be resolved (e.g. for the purpose of awarding prize(s), a play-off between players in different blocks, or qualification for another event), then the players in the tie are placed relative to each other in descending order of the number of games they have won (included those awarded, with drawn games counting as half a win) in this composite block in the games played between them. If necessary, this procedure may be repeated.
      5. If there is still a tie that needs to be resolved, Regulation M2(c)(6) should be applied.
    5. For doubles, team or best-of-N formats, in (1)-(4) above "player" should be read to mean "side or team", and "game" should be read to mean "match", as appropriate.
  6. INCOMPLETE MULTIPLE-SERIES BLOCKS.
    1. The games played in a block are divided into series, such that the first game scheduled to be started between any two players belongs to the first series, the second game between the same two players to the second series and so on.
    2. Any series for which results are available for fewer than half of the games scheduled in it shall be treated as having been abandoned and the results in it shall be ignored for the purpose of deciding the final placings.
    3. Having applied (2) above, any player whose final placing under (b) above, had all the other series been completed, could be predicted to be the same whatever the outcome of the uncompleted games shall be given that placing.
    4. Having applied (2) and (3) above, any player for whom results are available for fewer than half of the largest number of games completed by any player in a series, or who has failed to win a game in a series, shall be treated as having withdrawn from that series and the results of any games played in it by him shall be ignored for the purpose of deciding the remaining placings.
    5. Having applied (2), (3) and (4) above, if all the non-abandoned series are complete with respect to the players deemed to have competed in them, then (b) above is applied to determine the remaining placings not established under (3), as though the block had contained only those players and series.
    6. Otherwise, the procedure defined in (e)(4) above is applied, except that the following clause applies instead of (e)(4)(A).
      1. For each pair of players in each of the series the following comparison is performed:
        1. Subject to (B) below, in comparing the available results of two players, only the results of the game played between them, and of their games against other players whom they both have played in that series, shall be considered.
        2. If the results considered give both players equal numbers of wins, they are each awarded one matchpoint; otherwise, the player with the greater number of wins is awarded two matchpoints and the other player none.
    7. For doubles, team or best-of-N formats, in (1)-(6) above "player" should be read to mean "side or team", and "game" should be read to mean "match", as appropriate.
  7. COMPLETE AND INCOMPLETE BLOCKS (ADVANTAGE GC).
    1. This regulation applies to Advantage GC Play. See (c) above for Level and Extra Turn Handicap Golf Croquet.
    2. A match shall be defined as a single contest between two players and can comprise either a single game or the best-of-3 or best-of-5 games. Where play in a block requires each player to play all of the others twice, each of these games will be regarded as a single-game match.
    3. Players are placed in descending order of the number of matches they have won.
    4. If there are two or more players with the same number of wins, placings shall be decided as follows:
      1. Only in the case of best-of-3 or best-of-5 matches, the group of players shall be separated by the net games won in all their matches in the block.
      2. For any group of players still tied, the total number of hoops each player scored across all the games they played in the block will be divided by the total number of hoops they would have needed to win all the games they played in the block, and the players are placed in descending order of this percentage.
      3. Any group of players still tied shall be separated by the number of matches won in the matches played between those players.
      4. Only in the case of best-of-3 or best-of-5 matches, any group of players still tied shall be separated by the net games in the matches between those players. If this produces a partial resolution then the group or groups of players still needing to be separated shall be placed by returning to step 4C.
      5. For any group of players still tied, the total number of hoops each player scored in the games between each of these players will be divided by the total number of hoops they would have needed to win the games between each of these players, and the players are placed in descending order of this percentage.
      6. If none of the above produces a result, Regulation M2(c)(6) shall be applied.
    5. Games that finish due to time limits are included (although with the general advice that time limits should be avoided for Advantage GC).
    6. This regulation applies to incomplete blocks, where results only from complete rounds are considered. Results from partial rounds are discarded for the purpose of determining block positions.

F3 Swiss Events

  1. CONCEPT. A format in which every player plays in every round, with players paired, as far as possible, against opponents on the same score. No player should meet a player more than once. The number of rounds should normally be at least two greater than the number of rounds required in a single-life knockout event for the same entry.
  2. DETERMINATION OF PAIRINGS. The following rules are applied in the order in which they appear below.
    1. Positions in the draw for the first round are determined by lot.
    2. No player may play the same opponent more than once except in the final round as a tie-break under Regulation M2(c)(6).
    3. After each round all players are grouped in order of their cumulative scores. The players within each group are then ordered as in the previous round.
    4. Pairings for the next round are generated by pairing players as follows:
      1. The top two players.
      2. The bottom two players.
      3. The top two unpaired players.
      4. The bottom two unpaired players; and so on until all players are paired.
    5. A player who cannot be paired under (4) above is paired instead with the unpaired player whose record is closest. If the draw becomes blocked, so that no such pairing is possible, then it will be necessary to 'rewind' some of the pairings made in order that another pairing can be made to resolve the blockage.
  3. BYES AND DEFAULTS.
    1. If the number of players is odd, or becomes odd by a player withdrawing, then, for pairing purposes, an imaginary player named Bye is introduced whose score is permanently zero. If a real player is paired with Bye in any round, the game is deemed to have been won by the maximum margin. Bye is withdrawn if the number of real players later becomes even.
    2. If a player defaults in any round, the opponent is deemed to win by the maximum margin.
    3. No player may be paired with Bye more than once.
  4. DETERMINATION OF THE WINNER.
    1. The winner is the player who has won the most games.
    2. If there is a tie between two players who have played each other, the winner is the winner of the game between them.
    3. If there is a tie between more than two players, all of whom have played each other, the winner is the player who has won the most games in the games between the players in the tie. (See Appendix 4 for a worked example.)
    4. If there is a tie between more than two players, one of whom has played and defeated all of the other players in the tie, the winner is that player.
    5. If necessary, steps 2, 3 and 4 may be repeated.
    6. If there is still a tie, Regulation M2(c)(6) may be applied.

F4 Progressive Swiss Events

  1. CONCEPT. A Progressive Swiss is a Swiss played as a consolation event for a single-life knockout competition, which players enter as they are eliminated from the main event.
  2. DETERMINATION OF PAIRINGS. After each round, the players eliminated from the corresponding round of the main event are included, credited with their record in the main event. They are inserted in draw order, above any players in the consolation event with the same number of wins. Pairings are then determined as in a Swiss.

F5 Flexible Swiss Events

  1. CONCEPT. A Flexible Swiss is similar to a Swiss in that players are paired against those with similar records, with the exception that players need not play the same number of games. A player may, with the Tournament Manager's agreement, choose to declare himself unavailable for the time being.
  2. SUITABILITY. A Flexible Swiss format may be used for consolation, qualifying or other events where determining a single winner is not of prime importance.
  3. DETERMINATION OF PAIRINGS. When the Tournament Manager decides that games are to be started, the available players who have been waiting longest, up to the number required to fill the available courts, are ranked according to the percentage of games they have won in the event (including any main event for which this is a consolation) so far. They are then paired as in Regulations F3(b)(4) and F3(b)(5).
  4. DETERMINATION OF THE WINNER. The winner, or qualifiers, shall be those with the greatest percentage of games won, subject to any minimum number of games declared by the Tournament Manager. In the event of a tie between two or more players who have all played each other, the winner is the player who has won the most games in the games between them. If this does not resolve the tie, Regulation M2(c)(6) may be applied or the title shared.

F6 Egyptian Events

An Egyptian event is played as a Flexible Swiss except that players are assigned a rating which is adjusted in accordance with a published procedure depending on the result of each game. Players may be paired arbitrarily when games are to be started and the winner is whoever has the greatest increase in rating rather than percentage of games won.

F7 Class Events

  1. DRAW. When there are events played in classes according to handicap, players must be drawn in such classes as their official handicaps entitle them to enter, subject to Regulation M2(c)(5).
  2. SUBSEQUENT CHANGE. If a player is correctly drawn in a class but becomes ineligible before play in that class begins, the player may at the Tournament Manager's discretion be removed from that class and treated as an entry accidentally included therein and accidentally omitted from the class to which the player now belongs (see Regulations F1(c)(5-6) for knockout events).

F8 Incomplete or Unfinished Games

The following general principles should be applied to all tournaments, irrespective of format.

  1. If one of the players withdraws or is scratched from a game that has started, the other player is deemed to have won it by scoring all the remaining points. Handicap index points and ranking results should be calculated as if the game was completed on this basis.
  2. Games otherwise unfinished, or which were scheduled but not started for any reason, should not be counted for handicapping or ranking purposes.
  3. No player should gain an advantage from failing or being unable to start or complete any games.
  4. No player should be placed at a disadvantage by being unable to start or complete any games for reasons beyond the player's control.

H. Handicaps

H1 Handicaps

  1. PLAYING OFF THE CORRECT HANDICAP. In all events a competitor must play each game at the correct handicap as it was at the start of the event. For competitions that run over several weeks, such as the [AC: Longman or Mary Rose] [GC: Murphy Shield], each round shall count as a separate event for the purposes of this Regulation. A player should seek an official handicap before entering any handicap-limited event.
  2. HANDICAPPING PROCEDURES. The Executive is empowered to issue procedures for giving new handicaps and altering existing handicaps, which are published from time to time and appear on the Croquet England website; see:
  3. OFFICIAL HANDICAPS. Once assigned an initial handicap, players are responsible for recording their results and calculating any change in their handicap arising from operation of the published procedures. They must ensure that any change is notified to interested parties in accordance with the procedures described in (b) above. Player's handicaps will be recorded in the Croquet England Directory.
  4. HANDICAP RANGE. For Association Croquet, handicaps range from -3 to 5 in half-bisque increments, from 5 to 12 in whole-bisque increments, and above 12 in two-bisque increments (i.e. even-numbered handicaps). For Golf Croquet, handicaps range from -6 to 12 in single-stroke increments and above 12 in two-stroke increments (i.e. even-numbered handicaps).
  5. HANDICAP LIMITS. There is no general maximum handicap for fixtures organised by Croquet England, although certain events may have a minimum or maximum handicap stipulated. Players outside any specified handicap range may not be asked to, nor agree to, play off an incorrect handicap in order to gain entry into an event (but see (f) below).
  6. ELIGIBILITY FOR EVENTS. Limits on the handicaps of players or teams eligible to take part may be set for some events. Where this is the case, a player or team whose handicap falls outside the set limits will still be eligible to play provided that it was within the set limits at or after the Allocation Date for entries or, if no Allocation Date is published, one week prior to the start date of the event. For competitions played over several weeks, such as the [AC: Longman or Mary Rose] [GC: Murphy Shield], each round is considered to be a separate event, and the Allocation Date to be one week prior to the round being played.

H2 The Tournament Handicapper

  1. APPOINTMENT. If possible, a National Handicapper shall be appointed as Tournament Handicapper. Where a National Handicapper is not available, a Club Handicapper should be appointed as Tournament Handicapper. Where neither a National Handicapper nor a Club Handicapper is available, the Tournament Manager or another suitable person shall be appointed by the Organising Body.
  2. POWERS AND DUTIES. The powers and duties of a Tournament Handicapper are as follows.
    1. CONFIRMING. To ensure that players' handicaps are checked as soon as possible at the start of a handicap event, and by the end of the first day at the latest.
    2. ADVISING. To advise players about the correct operation of the handicapping system.
    3. ALTERING. To alter official handicaps before or after an event, when necessary, according to [AC: published procedures] [GC: published procedures].
    4. ENFORCING. To act as necessary under Regulation P5(b), and report any action taken to the Croquet England Complaints Administrator in accordance with Regulation P2(e).
  3. APPEALS. An Appeals Committee established under Regulation O3 may overturn the decision of a Tournament Handicapper only if it is chaired by a National Handicapper.

H3 Short Croquet


L. Approved Laws/Rules Variations

Variations L1-L6 to AC Laws, GC Rules or WCF Refereeing Regulations are approved for Croquet England Calendar Fixtures.

L1 Optional Laws/Rules (Association and Golf Croquet)

  1. ASSOCIATION CROQUET
    1. TOURNAMENT AND MATCH PLAY. Law 60 applies to all Calendar Fixtures.
    2. SUPER-ADVANCED. Unless specified otherwise in the tournament/event conditions, Laws 40 and 41 apply if all players in a game or match agree to it.
    3. ALTERNATE STROKE DOUBLES. Unless specified otherwise in the tournament/event conditions, Laws 48, 49 or 50 apply if all players in a game or match agree to it. The AC Tournament Committee is conducting a trial, applicable to the 2024 season, which permits Alternate Stroke Doubles to be played by only one side of a game or match.
    4. HOOP TOLERANCES. Hoop tolerances for tournament and match play (as referred to in Law 5.2.1.3) are defined in Appendix 1
  2. GOLF CROQUET RULES
    1. ADVANTAGE PLAY. Rule 21 may be applied to a Tournament or Event at the discretion of the Tournament Manager

L2 Forestalling Wrong Ball Play when Observing a Game (Golf Croquet)

The following clause is added to WCF Refereeing Regulations:

L3 One-Ball - Handicap Play (Association Croquet)

A revised One-Ball Handicap system has been adopted by Croquet England. Paragraph A5.4 of Appendix 5 of the Laws is replaced with:

A5.4 Handicap Play.

  1. A player's One-Ball Handicap shall be the lowest of:
    1. The player's AC handicap (but the table in the existing Appendix is used to adjust AC handicaps below 2); or
    2. 2.5x the player's GC handicap (for positive-handicap players), or the player's GC handicap (for handicap zero or below); or
    3. 20.
  2. The number of bisques to be given is one third of the difference between the handicaps of the players, rounded to the nearest half or full bisque.

This page provides further guidance, and also a downloadable poster which may be useful to clubs or Tournament Managers.

L4 Trial Use of Video to Support Refereeing (Association and Golf Croquet)

Video recording equipment is becoming more common at croquet tournaments, and may offer potential for more accurate refereeing, particularly if a Referee was not present during the stroke in question, when details of an error are unclear, or when adjudicating marginal faults. The AC and GC Tournament, AC Laws and GC Rules committees have agreed to experiment with the use of such technology and consequently have approved this trial. Tournament Referees not wishing to participate in this trial should make this clear in a notice to players prior to the start of play.

R3.3 is amended by addition of:

R3.5 is amended by addition of, with renumbering of the existing R3.5.4:

Feedback is requested on any situation in which video evidence was used, whether or not it resulted in a different decision from that which may otherwise have been made. This will allow further evaluation about the types of incident in which after-the-event video evidence is useful.

L5 Handicaps for Doubles Advantage Play (Golf Croquet)

Rule 21.5 of the 6th Edition WCF GC Rules does not work satisfactorily for pairs with average handicaps which exceed 12, unless the average is an even integer or 0.5 less than an even integer.

Rule 21.5 is therefore replaced by:

21.5 Doubles.

21.5.1 In doubles, the handicap of each side is the average of the handicaps of its players and, subject to Rule 21.5.2, if it is not an integer (a whole number), it is to be rounded upwards (e.g. 7.5 is rounded up to 8).

21.5.2 For averages greater than 12 which are not even integers:

  1. one is to be added to odd integers (e.g. 13 is to be treated as 14); and
  2. non-integers are to be rounded up or down to the nearest even integer (e.g. 12.5 is rounded down to 12 but 13.5 is rounded up to 14).

L6 Playing Out of Sequence in Alternate Stroke Doubles (Association Croquet)

Law 48.4 does not work satisfactorily in a number of cases where the turn ended during the stroke(s) in error, particularly if the side was just intending to lay or join up, as the balls are replaced but there is no replay. The World Croquet Federation's AC Laws Committee has considered various suggestions to improve it and is currently minded to amend the law to require the first stroke in error to be replayed by the correct player irrespective of the previous outcome. This would treat the error analogously to playing when not entitled, though with a shorter limit of claims.

Croquet England's AC Laws Committee has agreed that this should be tried, so the AC Laws for play within the domain are amended as follows until further notice:


M. The Tournament Manager

M1 Duties of the Tournament Manager

The duties of the Manager of a tournament are as follows.

  1. ENTRIES. To advise the Organising Body of the maximum number of entries that can be accommodated.
  2. DRAW. To superintend or make the draw or to nominate another to do so.
  3. HOURS OF PLAY. To decide when play shall start and finish each day of the tournament. Play may only continue after civil dusk (which is typically about 40 minutes after sunset) under artificial light if this has been advertised in advance of the event.
  4. WARM-UP. To decide when players may warm up on the courts, and to inform them if they are not permitted to practise, in accordance with Regulation P4(e).
  5. ORDER OF PLAY. To decide the order in which events and games are played.
  6. COURTS.
    1. To allot courts to competitors.
    2. To declare any court to be unfit for play. Decisions about whether a court is fit for play should take into account the views of the host club, particularly if there is a concern about damage to the courts. If a court is declared unfit for play, the Manager may suspend play until conditions improve and/or move a game, even if it is in progress, to another court.
  7. BALLS. When double-banking is used, to allocate first colour balls whenever possible to competitors who have registered a Colour Vision Deficiency.
  8. INFORMATION AND REPORTING.
    1. During the event, to keep players and spectators informed of any alterations to the programme and of the progress of the tournament.
    2. As soon as possible after the event, to submit tournament results in the correct order and in the required layout and format.
  9. TROPHIES. To support arrangements for the presentation of any trophies (see Regulation O4(c)).
  10. CONSULTATION. To discuss with the Organising Body prior to the event, and agree any alterations to, the published tournament programme.
  11. WELFARE. To take such other actions as may be appropriate in an emergency, or to protect the safeguarding, well-being and interests of players, spectators, the Organising Body and any host club.

M2 Powers of the Tournament Manager

The powers of the Manager are as follows. These should be exercised by the Manager as required in the overall interests of the event, but must be used in a manner which is both consistent and equitable.

  1. ADJOURNMENT. To adjourn an unfinished game, provided that no ball is in a critical position [AC: (see Laws Glossary)], and to record the state of the game or to nominate another to do so.
  2. LEAVE. To grant or refuse leave of absence to players (see Regulation P4(c)). Players who are absent when they have been refused leave by the manager may be scratched from those games for which they are not available.
  3. PROGRAMME. To alter the tournament programme in any of the following ways:
    1. Impose, alter or remove time limits under Regulation T1 or T3(a).
    2. [AC] Shorten games in accordance with Laws 51, 52 and 53.
    3. [AC] Play the final rounds of an event in which the games have been shortened as full games.
    4. Play a single-life event as two-life, best-of-3, American or Swiss, or play later rounds of an event advertised as best-of-N as best of some larger odd number.
    5. Alter handicap limits in class events and make consequential adjustments to entries.
    6. Impose tie-breaks. If the procedure to be used is not as defined in Regulation F, the procedure to be used should be advertised before the event starts. If nothing is so advertised, then Regulation F should apply. If Regulation F does not result in a solution, the recommended solution is for a shortened tie-break game (under the same Laws/Rules as the rest of the event) consisting of as many hoops as the Manager considers there is time for, with such time limit as the Manager thinks expedient. Net hoops (first across all games and then in the games between tied players) may be used for a level play event. If there is no time for, or if conditions prevent, further play and sharing a trophy (or position) is considered unacceptable, lots may be drawn.
    7. Introduce a two-life variation under Regulation F1(e).
    8. Introduce double-banking.
    9. Specify the width of the hoops within the range advertised for the event, in the light of the conditions and standard of play.
  4. LATENESS. If a player is late, absent or otherwise unavailable for play (other than in accordance with Regulation P4), and it is thought or known that the player will not be available following a short delay, then:
    1. If it is both possible (within the constraints of Regulation F) and practicable, without significantly delaying other games or unduly disrupting the schedule, start a different game.
    2. Allow one player of a doubles pair to start a game in the absence of the missing player, [AC: declaring the other ball] [GC: leaving the other ball as an outside agency], without incurring any other penalty. The missing player may join the game later, but may not play a turn until after the opponents have:
      • [AC] started at least one turn knowing that the missing player has joined the game.
      • [GC] played at least one turn knowing that the missing player has joined the game.
    3. Start the game late as soon as both players are present.
      • [AC] Except in Championship events, the delayed game may be adjusted, including by one or more of the following methods.
        1. If the late player is receiving bisques, the number of bisques may be reduced by the proportion of time for which the player was unavailable (rounding down to the nearest half-bisque). If the late player is giving bisques, no adjustment should be made.
        2. The time limit for the game may be reduced by the length of time by which the player was late. If the game is not completed by a player pegging out, the player who was available at the start shall be deemed to have won by 26 points to the number of points scored by the player who was late.
      • [GC] The subsequent game may be adjusted at the Manager's discretion, after taking into account all the circumstances.
    4. If none of these is possible (or practicable because of the degree of lateness), declare the late player to have lost the game (or match). Normally a player would have to be at least an hour late for this to apply for a first offence. The opponent of the late player is credited with a win only if it is necessary for the progress of the event (for example in the case of a knockout (F1) or strict Swiss (F3) event). In block events (F2) where the game cannot be rescheduled, the block should be treated as incomplete [AC: noting Regulation F2(e)(4)(B)]; in more flexible formats (such as a Flexible Swiss (F5) or Egyptian (F6) event), the Manager should arrange another game for the missing player's opponent. Note also the provisions in Regulation F8.
    5. GENERAL PRINCIPLES.
      1. Lateness applies to all matches, not just at the start of the day.
      2. Doubles pairs should be considered as a single unit for the purposes of lateness.
      3. Repeat lateness in the same event should be dealt with more severely than the first offence.
      4. In extreme cases, disqualification of the offending player can be appropriate.
  5. WITHDRAWALS. In the event of a late withdrawal (see Regulation P3(h)), omitted entry (See F1(c)(6) or disqualification (see (g) below), to make amendments as follows.
    1. If the event has not yet started and it is practicable to do so, adjust or re-do the draw.
    2. If the event has started, or it is not practicable to adjust the draw, then:
      1. In a Knockout event (Regulation F1), treat the withdrawn player as having lost the game with the opponent progressing to the next round. In no circumstance can a beaten player be reinstated following a withdrawal.
      2. In a Block event (Regulation F2), apply Regulation F2(d).
      3. In other events, when possible and practicable without significantly delaying other games or unduly disrupting the schedule, remove the withdrawn player and allocate another game. If this is not possible (or a withdrawal occurs during a game), the withdrawn player should be considered to have lost the game; this Regulation should be reconsidered for the following round.
  6. LATE ENTRIES. In the event of a late entry (see C3(c)), to apply one of the following:
    1. In a Knockout event (Regulation F1), apply Regulation F1(c)(5).
    2. In a Block event (Regulation F2), adjust or re-do the draw.
    3. In other events, adjust or re-do the draw.
  7. SANCTIONS. To impose an appropriate sanction on any player who is found to be in breach of any of these Regulations. This may include, in the last resort, disqualification. Action taken under this Regulation must be reported to the Croquet England Complaints Administrator in accordance with Regulation P2(e).

O. Officials

O1 Appointment

  1. Every tournament must have a Tournament Manager, Tournament Handicapper and Tournament Referee appointed by the Organising Body. The appointment of the Tournament Handicapper must be made in accordance with Regulation H2(a).
  2. The Organising Body may appoint a Tournament Director to act on its behalf. If it does not do so, the powers and duties of the Tournament Director as set out in this Regulation remain with the Organising Body.
  3. A person may be appointed to more than one of these posts.

O2 Powers and Duties

These officials are together responsible, each so far as the powers and duties are herein defined, for the interpretation and enforcement of the [AC: Laws] [GC: Rules] and Regulations and the administration of the tournament.

  1. DIRECTOR. Specific powers and duties of the Tournament Director are set out Regulation O4.
  2. MANAGER. Specific powers and duties of the Tournament Manager are set out in Regulation M.
  3. HANDICAPPER. Specific powers and duties of the Tournament Handicapper are set out in Regulation H2(b).
  4. REFEREE. Specific powers and duties of the Tournament Referee are set out in Regulation R.

O3 Appeals Committee

  1. The Organising Body may also appoint an Appeals Committee to hear appeals against decisions of the Manager or (in accordance with Regulation H2(c)) the Tournament Handicapper, or allegations that the Tournament Referee is acting improperly.
  2. Where possible, an Appeals Committee should comprise at least three suitable individuals, including one member of the Organising Body, to determine finally any appeal or complaint from a Player, provided that the Player has first attempted to resolve the matter with the relevant Tournament Official.
  3. The Appeals Committee will not hear appeals against decisions on matters of the [AC: Laws] [GC: Rules] made by Referees. In these matters a decision made by the Tournament Referee will be final.

O4 Tournament Director

The powers and duties of the Tournament Director are as follows:

  1. PLANNING THE EVENT
    1. Prepare the Calendar Fixture entry, in accordance with Regulations C1(b) and C2, acting under any specific guidance issued by the Organising Body.
    2. Establish contact with the assigned host club for the event or final no later than 1 April for the season under consideration, and discuss practical arrangements including the number of courts required, mowing regime, hoop specifications, catering schedules, etc.
    3. Ensure that all necessary Tournament Officials are appointed (see Regulation O1).
    4. Liaise with the Tournament Manager about the format and plans for the events, and under Regulations M1(h-k) in particular.
    5. Work with the office and Trophy Holders to ensure the return of trophies to the office no later than 2 months before the next event, and help to resolve difficulties as necessary. Use of Croquet England's courier service should be considered as a last resort.
  2. BEFORE THE EVENT
    1. Oversee the acceptance of entries to the event (see Regulation C3). This includes monitoring entries to the event or final, considering any appropriate action to encourage additional entries.
    2. Liaise with the host club if any entries require special arrangements made in accordance with Croquet England's Safeguarding or Welfare policies. This could include adjustments for vulnerable groups, or for players with disabilities or colour vision deficiency (CVD).
    3. Informing the Tournament Manager of any players with safeguarding requirements and the arrangements made, including for any child the identity of any accompanying parent or responsible adult.
    4. Liaise (at least one month prior to the event or final) with the office to confirm delivery arrangements for the trophy or trophies to the event or final.
    5. Liaise with the host club about lawn speeds and plans to ensure that appropriate playing conditions will be achieved (see Court and Equipment Fees) and hoops will be appropriately set (see Appendix 1).
    6. Liaise with the assigned host club for the event or final to confirm that all arrangements are on course.
  3. DURING THE EVENT
    1. Carry out, or appoint someone to carry out, activities including:
      1. Submitting articles to the Croquet England Gazette to inform the croquet community of changes to or issues with the event, or to sustain interest in and understanding of the event.
      2. Presenting trophies to event winners.
      3. Submitting a report to the Croquet England website as soon as possible after the completion of the event.
      4. In cooperation with other Tournament Officials, any 'live' reporting such as to CroquetScores.com.
    2. Monitor the conduct of the event and seek resolution of any issues as necessary. Matters arising during an event should be deferred to the relevant other Tournament Official (see Regulation O2) in the first instance, but the Tournament Director may (if present or otherwise available) act in the event of dispute.
  4. AFTER THE EVENT
    1. Ensure that the requirements of Regulation C1(c) (returns from tournaments) are met.
    2. For Croquet England Trophies, inform the office of the names of Trophy Holders, and where each trophy will be located if retained by the Trophy Holder. If a trophy (or part of a trophy) is not retained, inform the office of the interim location and arrange to return it to the office.
    3. Ensure that Croquet England is informed of any issues that may necessitate changes to the Croquet England Tournament Regulations or any other aspect of Croquet England Policy.
    4. If requested, provide a review of the event to the Organising Body highlighting any issues or changes that will allow the event to develop.
    5. Report, in accordance with Regulation P2(e), to the Croquet England Complaints Administrator any breach or suspected breach by a player of any Tournament Regulations or any Croquet England Policy. Any action taken by the Tournament Manager under Regulation M2(g), a Referee under [AC: Law 63.2] [GC Rule 16.4], or the Tournament Handicapper under Regulation H2(b)(4) shall also be reported.

P. Players

P1 Eligibility to Compete in Calendar Fixtures

  1. CROQUET ENGLAND AFFILIATION.
    1. Subject to (2) and (3) below, only Croquet England Subscribers and members of any overseas Associations for which reciprocal arrangements apply (see WCF Statute 164) may compete in Calendar Fixtures.
    2. Croquet England may remove or relax this restriction for certain Calendar Fixtures ("exempt fixtures"). The following are currently exempt:
      • The AC and GC All-England Handicap Championship
      • The AC and GC Students' or Under-25 Championships
      • The National Schools' and Juniors' Championships
      • The GC Grass Roots Golf Croquet Tournament
      • Coaching Events
      • Charity Events (see Regulation C1(a))
    3. For Croquet England inter-club team competitions, teams must represent Croquet England Affiliate Clubs, and players must be Individual Subscribers of Croquet England and playing members of the clubs they are representing.
  2. PROFESSIONALS.
    1. A professional croquet player may not compete in a Calendar Fixture if notice has been given in the tournament programme, in accordance with Regulation C2(a)(2), that professionals are excluded therefrom.
    2. A professional croquet player is defined as a player who has received and retained total prize money (including appearance money, but excluding expenses) exceeding the aggregate prize limit in the twelve months preceding the relevant Calendar Fixture.
    3. The aggregate prize limit will be determined from time to time by Croquet England. It is currently £5,000.

P2 Conduct

  1. GENERAL. The Croquet England Code of Conduct applies to entrants to all events. Players in tournaments are expected to behave in a manner that is not contrary to the integrity or reputation of the sport, and to participate in a spirit of friendship and fair play.
  2. DOPING.
    1. Doping is forbidden, in order to protect the rights and health of players and to protect the values of fair play in sport.
    2. The substances and procedures prohibited are those included in the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List, excluding caffeine and alcohol.
    3. An offence under this Regulation is committed when a player is found to have or admits to having:
      1. used a prohibited substance or procedure; or
      2. assisted, induced or caused another player to use a prohibited substance or procedure.
    4. An exception applies to (3) above if the substance or procedure was prescribed for medical reasons.
    5. A player found to have committed an offence under (3) above, or comparable regulations of other Associations recognised by Croquet England for this purpose, shall be disqualified from any events in which the player was competing at the time of, or subsequent to, the offence. The player shall remain ineligible to compete in Calendar Fixtures for such period as shall be determined by the Executive.
  3. GAMBLING.
    1. A player may neither accept bets on themselves nor place bets on the player's current or future opponent.
    2. A player or Tournament Official may neither place nor take bets on an event whose outcome the player or Tournament Official could influence.
    3. A player or a Croquet England Subscriber, whether or not competing in an event, may not offer any inducement to another player or Tournament Official to influence that event, nor may such an inducement be accepted.
  4. SMOKING. Smoking and vaping are prohibited while on the court during a game.
  5. MISCONDUCT. A player who contravenes any of these Tournament Regulations or any Croquet England Policy is liable to disciplinary action by Croquet England, which may include disqualification or a period of ineligibility to play in future Calendar Fixtures, in addition to any sanction imposed during the event. Any action taken by the Tournament Manager under Regulation M2(g), a Referee under [AC: Law 63.2] [GC: Rule 16.4], or the Tournament Handicapper under Regulation H2(b)(4) shall be reported to the Croquet England Complaints Administrator for this purpose.

P3 Entries

  1. PROCEDURE. For clubs enrolled with the online Tournament Entry System (TES), the preferred method of entry is via the Croquet England website. For other tournaments, or if the player prefers not to use the website, entries for each individual tournament must (unless otherwise stated within the Calendar Fixture entry) be made to the advertised Tournament Secretary on a separate copy of the official Croquet England form, giving all the information requested thereon. Copies of the form can be downloaded from the Croquet England website. Any subsequent changes to the information supplied must be notified to the Tournament Secretary before the Closing Date, if possible, or to the Tournament Manager thereafter.
  2. TIMING. For the best chance of acceptance, entries should be sent so as to arrive before the Allocation Date. See Regulation C3.
  3. DOUBLES. Entries for doubles events should include the name of the partner, failing which the Tournament Manager will allocate one if available if places remain available at the Closing Date.
  4. PAYMENT. Unless otherwise stated, entries should be accompanied by the advertised entry fee, either in the form of a cheque payable to the host club for paper entries, or through the on-line payment system for on-line entries. The entry fee includes the Croquet England Levy and any appropriate gratuities. An entry may be refused if the fee has not been paid prior to the advertised date of the draw; however, if the entry is accepted the player becomes liable to pay the total fee, and may be disqualified for non-payment.
  5. CONFIRMATION. On-line entries through the Croquet England website will receive immediate confirmation of receipt; for paper entries, a stamped, addressed envelope should be sent if confirmation of receipt is required. Most clubs will confirm acceptance by e-mail but, if the player prefers, a second s.a.e. can be provided for such confirmation.
  6. REFUSAL. Entries to events that are oversubscribed will be dealt with under Regulation C3. Tournament organisers reserve the right to refuse an entry on other grounds, but are required under Regulation C3(e) to give their reason(s) to the entrant on request.
  7. WITHDRAWAL. If an entrant withdraws before the Closing Date, an administrative charge may apply. See Regulation C3.
  8. LATE WITHDRAWAL. Only in the case of illness, injury or personal emergency may a player withdraw after the advertised date of the draw, or default during an event. In a knockout event, any withdrawal must be made by informing the Tournament Manager and any scheduled opponent (scratching if the match is in progress) as soon as the player becomes aware of their inability to start or complete the event; in other events, the player should inform the Manager as soon as possible and seek direction. Contravention of this Regulation shall render the player liable to disciplinary action and shall be reported by the Organising Body to the Croquet England Complaints Administrator for this purpose. For the avoidance of doubt, withdrawal in a multi-event tournament from a secondary event (such as a plate event) prior to the start of that event shall not be an offence under this Regulation.
  9. OVERCOMMITTAL. All entries are accepted on the condition that a player may not continue to compete in more than one event if the Tournament Manager considers that the progress of the tournament is thereby being unduly delayed. However, if a player is scratched from an event for this reason before completing a game, any entry fee must be refunded.
  10. SPECTATORS. Spectators are encouraged at tournaments and may watch any game. This may include members of the host club, other participants in the tournament, selectors, tournament officials and members of the public. Subject to our Guidance for Photography Video and Live Streaming all players should be prepared for any event in which they are taking part to be live-streamed, videoed or photographed. Regulation P3(k) applies to images taken.
  11. DATA PROTECTION. By entering a tournament or other event, entrants accept that their personal data, including contact details, handicaps, Dynamic Grade, payment information and CVD information, may be used for administering, managing and reporting that event. This includes tournament administration, management, reporting, publicity, handicapping, ranking and selection purposes, and may also include the capture and broadcast of photographs or video. Payment information will not include credit card details, as payments are processed by a separate organisation (SagePay).
  12. UNDERTAKING. By entering, players agree to abide by these Regulations, Croquet England Policies (including, but not limited to, Safeguarding and Welfare) and any advertised variations.

P4 Conditions of Play

  1. HOURS OF PLAY. Unless otherwise advertised, play will commence at 9.30 am; the Tournament Manager may vary this time (see Regulation M1(c)). Players must be prepared to play until civil dusk, or later if the use of artificial light has been advertised.
  2. REPORTING. All players must report to the Tournament Manager on arrival and before leaving each day. Any player who is not present or is otherwise unable to play when called upon to do so is liable to be penalised under Regulation M2(d). Players must report game (or match) results to the Tournament Manager promptly upon completion of the game (or match).
  3. LEAVE. Unless otherwise stated, no leave will be granted until the draw is made. Applications for leave on the first day will be considered immediately after the draw; leave at other times should be requested as early as possible. The Tournament Manager may refuse leave in the interests of the tournament.
  4. ATTIRE.
    1. In all events, flat-soled footwear, without significant ridges or sharp edges, must be worn on the courts and, unless otherwise permitted, predominantly white clothing should be worn. Recognised international croquet team clothing, of a country that the player is eligible (under WCF Regulations) to represent, is permitted.
    2. In team events, such as the Inter-County Championships and Inter-Club events, teams may, subject to any dress code of the host club, elect to wear other colours of clothing, provided all team members (other than those wearing white) are wearing the same design.
    3. Variations to this policy are to be agreed by both the Organising Body and the Host Club.
  5. WARM-UP. Unless otherwise informed by the Tournament Manager, players may warm up during the ten minutes prior to the advertised start of play on the court allocated for their first match, taking care not to loosen the hoops or the peg. During the warm up period, hoop-running may only be attempted using strokes no harder than would be required to send the ball seven yards unimpeded, so as to not disturb the setting of the hoops. Practice at any other time (for example after the end of a day's play) requires the permission of the Manager and will be subject to the needs of the event. A warm up period for players with a late start would not normally be withheld.
  6. SCORING CLIPS. [GC: Unless the Tournament Manager has directed otherwise or there is a staffed scoreboard (or another method of displaying the score), scoring clips must be used by one or both sides in every game, including placement on the centre peg to indicate (a) which side has won each game in best-of-3 and best-of-5 matches, and (b) negative starting scores in Advantage GC when no other method is being used.]
  7. COURT CONDITIONS. All players in a game must bring to the attention of the Tournament Manager any conditions which may result in their allocated court being declared unfit for play under Regulation M1(f)(2).

P5 Handicaps

  1. BEFORE PLAY.
    1. Entrants are obliged to provide, at the time of entry, their current official handicap (see Regulation H1(c)). Any subsequent alteration must be reported to the Tournament Secretary before the draw (or to the Tournament Manager thereafter) if it may affect the block or class into which the player is drawn, or to the Tournament Manager on arrival at the tournament otherwise.
    2. If a player is no longer entitled to play in an event restricted by handicap because of a handicap change, the player must immediately inform the Tournament Secretary (and Tournament Manager if the draw has already been conducted). A player who enters an event that is restricted by handicap may play in the event with a handicap outside the specified range only under the conditions stipulated in Regulation H1(f).
    3. Players must make their handicap card available for confirmation by the Tournament Handicapper (see Regulation H2(b)(1)) at any handicap or handicap-restricted tournament. If a handicap card is maintained in another format, the player must make sufficient information available to allow confirmation by the Tournament Handicapper.
  2. DURING PLAY.
    1. The calculation of the number of [AC: bisques] [GC: extra strokes] to be given in a game is the joint responsibility of the players, who should personally confirm the handicap(s) of each other rather than rely on published lists. Once the game has started, the number of [AC: bisques] [GC: extra strokes] may not be changed and the result will stand.
    2. A player who:
      • plays in a handicap event having claimed a handicap higher than that to which the player is entitled, or
      • plays in a handicap-restricted class event that the player is not entitled to enter, or
      • cannot substantiate a claimed handicap
      may be disqualified.
    3. For the purposes of the tournament schedule, a disqualified player is treated as having withdrawn under Regulation M2(e). As an alternative to disqualification, the Tournament Manager may allow the player to continue to play at the incorrect handicap if it is in the interests of the tournament, but the player may not win any prize.
  3. AFTER PLAY. Any player whose handicap has changed automatically at the end of a tournament must report that change by updating the Croquet England directory. See Regulation H1(b).

P6 Trophies

  1. CONDITIONS FOR HOLDING. Unless otherwise stated, winners of trophies may hold them for one year or until next competed for, whichever period is the shorter. Croquet England Trophies winners may hold them only under the conditions set out in Appendix 2.
  2. FAILURE TO RETURN. Trophy holders are responsible for returning trophies before the end of the period during which they may hold them under (a) above. Disciplinary action, including a ban on holding trophies, may be taken against a Trophy Holder who fails to return the trophy and any such cases shall be reported by the Organising Body to the Croquet England Complaints Administrator and Croquet England Secretary for this purpose.

R. Referees

Croquet England has adopted the WCF Refereeing Regulations for all Calendar Fixtures. The current, v1.6, version is available in PDF on the WCF website or in cross-linked HTML format. In the event of discrepancy, the version on the WCF website takes precedence.

  1. Qualified Referees (R1.3): A Qualified Referee is an individual with an appropriate Croquet England refereeing qualification for the relevant code and event, or an individual holding equivalent qualifications from other national governing bodies. The official list of referees (R1.3, R2.3) is available within the Croquet England Directory and can be viewed by authorised individuals.
  2. Authorised Referees (R1.4): Unless the Tournament Referee or the Organising Body has directed otherwise (R7.1):
    1. Qualified Referees may act as Referees on Request for matters covered by R3.
    2. [AC: Assistant Referees may act as Referees on Request for matters covered by R3, subject to the requirement in R3.1.1 to seek advice from, or refer to, a fully qualified referee if the situation involves detailed interpretation of the laws.]
  3. Independent Observers: Unless the Tournament Referee has directed otherwise, all experienced players competing in a tournament or event may act for matters covered by R7.2.
  4. If insufficient qualified referees are available, the Tournament Referee may nominate other suitable persons (R2.3).
  5. If an appeal is made against a decision by the Tournament Referee acting as a Referee on Request or a Referee in Charge, and no Deputy Tournament Referee has been appointed, the Tournament Referee should appoint a Deputy to hear the appeal. The person appointed should be a qualified referee if available, failing which a member of the appropriate Rules/Laws Committee if immediately contactable, failing which the Manager or another experienced player.

Note also the Approved Laws Variations in Regulations L1 and L4.


T. Time Limits

Regulations T1 and T2 apply to Association Croquet only. Regulation T3 applies to Golf Croquet only.

T1 Permitted Time Limits

  1. BEFORE A GAME. The Tournament Manager may impose a time limit on each game in any round of an event. Time limits advertised in advance or announced at the tournament before the start of the event may be removed in accordance with Regulation M2(c)(1).
  2. DURING A GAME. If no time limit has been imposed under (a) above, the Tournament Manager may impose a time limit of no less than one hour on any game that has been in progress for at least 2 hours.
  3. STANDARD TIME LIMITS. If the manager has imposed a time limit under (a) above but not specified its length, the following standard time limits apply:
    1. For single games, 2½ hours (level play) or 3 hours (handicap play).
    2. For matches that are best-of-3 games, cumulative limits of 4, 7 and 9 hours for each game; for matches that are best-of-5 games, cumulative limits of 3, 5½, 7½, 9 and 10½ hours for each game. Time taken to complete a game after time has expired is deducted from that available for subsequent ones, subject to each game having a minimum time limit of 1½ hours.
    3. For 18-point games on courts between full and ¾ size, 1¾ hours.
    4. For 14-point games on courts between full and ¾ size, 1½ hours.
    5. For Short Croquet, or games on courts that are less than ¾ size, 1 hour.

T2 Limit on Number of Turns

  1. APPLICABILITY. As an alternative to a time limit imposed under Regulation T1(b), or to the final hour of a time limit imposed under Regulation T1(a), the Tournament Manager may limit instead the number of further turns to twelve (exclusive of any bisque turns) to be played by each side. The general procedure is as described in Law 61.1, with the following provisions.
  2. START. The additional turns shall start after the end of the extension period defined in Law 61.1.6. Law 61.2 shall not apply.
  3. END. If the game has not ended before these turns are completed, the side for which the greater number of points has been scored is the winner. If the scores are equal, play again continues and the side for which the next point is scored is the winner (any points scored subsequently in the stroke are ignored).

T3 Golf Croquet

  1. PERMITTED TIME LIMITS.
    1. BEFORE A GAME. The Tournament Manager may impose a time limit on each game in any round of an event. Time limits advertised in advance or announced at the tournament before the start of the event may be removed in accordance with Regulation M2(c)(1).
    2. DURING A GAME. If no time limit has been imposed under (a)(1) above, the Tournament Manager may impose a time limit of not less than a further 15 minutes on any game that has been in progress for at least 45 minutes.
    3. MINIMUM TIME LIMITS. Unless advertised in advance, the minimum time limits that may be imposed under (a) above are as follows.
      1. For 13-point games, 50 minutes.
      2. For 19-point games, 70 minutes.
      3. For matches which consist of more than one game, each game should use the same time limit. Any unused time from a game is carried forward and added to the time-limit for the next game in that match. Time taken to complete a game after time has expired is deducted from that available for the next game in that match.
  2. EXPIRY OF TIME LIMIT.
    1. GENERAL PROCEDURE
      1. For the sole purpose of determining whether the striker's turn ends before or after time is called, it is deemed that the striker's turn ends and the opponent's turn begins as soon as the striker's ball is struck.
      2. After time has expired, play continues for an extension period of a further eight turns.
      3. At the end of the extension period, the side that has scored the greater number of points is the winner. If the scores are equal and no announcement has been made before the start of the event that a tied outcome is acceptable, play again continues and the side for which the next point is scored is the winner (any points scored subsequently in the stroke are ignored).
    2. EXTRA STROKE HANDICAP PLAY (RULE 20). No extra stroke may be played either during the extension period allowed under (b)(1)(C) above or immediately thereafter. If play continues after the end of the extension period, under (b)(1)(D) above, any extra stroke may then be played.

Appendix 1. Hoop Setting and Inspection Requirements

  1. ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS
    1. HOOP WIDTH. The clearance is the difference between the maximum diameter of the largest ball to be used on the court and the distance between the inside edges of the uprights at half-ball height. Unless otherwise advertised in the Calendar Fixture entry, or stated below, hoops must be set such that the clearance is as near as possible to:
      1. 1/32" for Championship events of Grade 1 or 2 (see C2(b)(5)); or
      2. 1/16" for level-play events and events played under mixed conditions;
      3. 1/8" for handicap and other events.
      Tolerances on hoop settings are +0% and -50% in each case. The Tournament Manager may, in accordance with Regulation M2(c)(9), alter the advertised clearance by up to 50% in either direction, provided that this change and the reason for it are publicised before play starts that day.
    2. HOOP RIGIDITY. Hoops must be set firmly and securely such that no perceptible movement occurs when the crown is pushed/pulled with considerable force.
    3. GROUND CONDITION LOCAL TO HOOPS. Hoops should be set in ground that is level and flat. The jaws of hoops should be free of "rabbit runs" and the hoop approach areas should not contain defects that will deflect a ball from its intended course.
    4. PEGS. The use of [AC: corner pegs] [GC: half-way markers] is required for all Championship events, and recommended for all events.
  2. INSPECTION. The Referee of the Tournament or nominee shall inspect every hoop each morning before play begins for both width and rigidity. Hoops that do not satisfy the acceptance standards should be reset.
  3. NEW HOOP HOLES. To satisfy the acceptance standards on hoop width and rigidity and maintain them throughout a tournament, the hoops should be set into new holes immediately prior to the tournament. The objective is to generate a tight grip on the carrots throughout the tournament without the need for excessive packing in the later stages. The size and depth of the initial "core" that is removed should be minimised, depending on the nature of the ground. For soft ground, no core should be taken nor should any substitute carrots be used to start the holes: just drive the specified hoop into the ground, preferably using a hoop clamp (such as that available from the Croquet England Shop) set to the correct width. Where the ground is harder, a small core might have to be taken and/or a substitute carrot used to start the hole. Old hoop holes should be closed up with a screwdriver or similar (if no cores are taken), or filled with no more material than was removed (where coring is unavoidable), to prevent the build-up of hills over time. Any surface imperfections should be filled daily, as necessary, with grass clippings.
  4. INITIAL SETTING. The hoop carrots may be left standing slightly proud of the ground (up to, say, 1/2") but never so high that a ball might make contact with one. This will allow a margin for further penetration and, therefore, improved ground grip.
  5. INTERFERENCE. Should a protruding carrot interfere with the state of the game or an intended stroke, the striker should ask a Referee that the relevant hoop be knocked into the ground until the outer edge of the top of each carrot is level with the surface of the court whilst maintaining the width of the hoop at half-ball height. Any balls adjacent to the hoop must be carefully marked so that they can be accurately replaced should they be moved during the operation. No adjustment to the position of any ball may be made under Law 5.2.3. The protruding carrots should be ignored when applying AC Laws 16, 20 or 21; if they do not interfere, any tests should be conducted before adjusting the hoop, otherwise the hoop should be adjusted first.

Appendix 2. Croquet England Trophies

A Guidance Note for Winners of Croquet England Trophies

  1. Croquet England does not, at the present time, insure its various trophies because the cost of doing so has become prohibitive. It is accepted that if loss occurs a replacement will be found, either from the small store of redundant trophies or by purchase of a new trophy.
  2. The holder of a trophy who takes reasonable care of it will not be held legally liable for its loss. Those who feel that such loss would nevertheless be an embarrassment to them are advised to include the trophy on their household contents insurance policy schedule.
  3. Holders of trophies who retain possession of it will be asked by the office to confirm receipt for each trophy, its plinth and any associated carrying box.
  4. Holders are also required to look after trophies with reasonable care and to return them to the office two months before the event is next held. The trophies will then be retained by Croquet England, who will arrange transport to the next venue at which the event occurs.
  5. To maintain consistency and prevent damage, Croquet England is responsible for and will undertake all necessary engraving of its trophies. Arrangements will therefore be made to engrave all trophies prior to award the following year. Holders of trophies must not arrange to have them engraved without obtaining the approval of the Chair of the Association Croquet Tournaments Committee.
  6. It is a Croquet England requirement that in no circumstances can a Croquet England trophy, other than those for international events, be taken outside the boundaries of England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

Appendix 3. Example of the Use of Matchpoints to Resolve Incomplete Blocks

This appendix is intended to clarify Regulation F2(e)(4) by providing a worked example. The principle is that each player is given a matchpoint score, calculated by comparing the player's results with those of each of the other players in turn: the player receives two points for each other player with a lower number of wins and one point for each other player with the same number of wins, in each case taking into account only those games in which either they have played each other or they both have played an opponent.

Case Study

Example Block with results as played:

Results Table A B C D E F
A   + + - - -
B -   - + / +
C - +   - - +
D + - +   / /
E + / + /   -
F + - - / +  

Assume that B v E, D v E and D v F were not completed because of flooding, i.e. none of the players is to be held responsible. Note that for each game we only need to know who won (+) and lost (-) or that the game was incomplete (/). Scores are not used.

Calculating the Matchpoint Table

A's matchpoints are calculated as follows:

This is repeated for the remaining players, resulting in the following matchpoint table:

Matchpoint Table A B C D E F Total
A   1 1 1 0 1 4
B 1   1 0 0 1 3
C 1 1   0 0 1 3
D 1 2 2   1 2 8
E 2 2 2 1   1 8
F 1 1 1 0 1   4

Calculating the Composite Table

The composite table is then constructed, with players keeping their wins or losses for games actually played, and being awarded 1 or 0 points respectively. For the remaining games (highlighted in red) they are awarded half the number of matchpoints in those games.

Composite Table A B C D E F Composite Wins
A   1 1 0 0 0 2
B 0   0 1

0

1 2
C 0 1   0 0 1 2
D 1 0 1  

0.5

1

3.5
E 1

1

1

0.5

  0 3.5
F 1 0 0

0

1   2

Placings

Overall D and E tie for first place. Their records are symmetrical and they tied the 'game' between them, so there is nothing to separate them without some further play. (And one assumes that there is no time for play-offs else we wouldn't have been in the position of incomplete block in the first place.)

F takes 3rd place ahead of A as F beat A; similarly, C is 5th.

Placings Table Composite Wins Matchpoints Position
D 3.5 8 1=
E 3.5 8 1=
F 2 4 3
A 2 4 4
C 2 3 5
B 2 3 6

Alternative Scenario

If E had got cold feet and scratched before starting E's remaining two games, the matchpoints would instead be as follows (the changes highlighted in red).

Matchpoint Table A B C D E F Total
A   1 1 1 0 1 4
B 1   1 0 0 1 3
C 1 1   0 0 1 3
D 1 2 2   1 2 8
E 1 0 1 0   1 3
F 1 1 1 0 1   4

Note firstly that only E's matchpoints change; no-one else's are affected by E's decision to scratch. E's matchpoints are now recalculated as follows:

We then calculate the composite table as below. Once again 'games' awarded using matchpoints are highlighted in red.

Composite Table A B C D E F Composite Wins Matchpoints Position
A   1 1 0 0 0 2 4 3
B 0   0 1

0

1 2 3 6
C 0 1   0 0 1 2 3 5
D 1 0 1  

0.5

1

3.5 8 1
E 1

0

1

0

  0 2 3 4
F 1 0 0

0

1   2 4 2

Now we have D winning the block.

F is second and A third (as before, because F beat A)

On composite wins and matchpoints, B, C and E all tie for 4th place on 3 points each. If this had to be resolved, C and E each won 1 game of those played between the three of them, so B is 6th. Applying Regulation F2(e)(4)(D) again, E beat C so is 4th, leaving C 5th.


Appendix 4. Example of the Resolution of Ties ('Who Beat Whom') in Complete Blocks

This appendix is intended to clarify the execution of 'who beat whom', as defined in Regulations F2(b)(2), F2(c)(2)(C) and F3(d)(3), by providing a worked example.

First, note that 'who beat whom' is an informal description of the procedure, but one which is less specific and can be ambiguous. Instead, we use 'descending order of the number of games they have won in the games played between them' in order to remove this ambiguity in more complex ties.

In a 2-way tie, matters are simple: either Player A beat Player B or B beat A. Done.

In a 3-way tie, either:

In the two latter cases, each of the players has won one game of the three games played between the tied players (i.e. 'who beat whom' doesn't help you) and you have to move to the next tie-break criterion in the list.

So far, the Regulation text produces the same result as 'who beat whom'.

Now consider this 4-way tie in a six-player block:

  A B C D X Y Wins
A   1 1 0 1 0 3
B 0   1 1 0 1 3
C 0 0   1 1 1 3
D 1 0 0   1 1 3
X 0 1 0 0   1 2
Y 1 0 0 0 0   1

'Who beat whom' doesn't define what to do. But 'descending order of the number of games they have won in the games played between them' is more specific. Players A, B, C and D are tied, so in this case we ignore games involving X or Y. This results in this sub-table of results between the tied players:

  A B C D Wins
A   1 1 0 2
B 0   1 1 2
C 0 0   1 1
D 1 0 0   1

We find A and B on 2 points. This eliminates C and D, but leaves A and B still tied. 'If necessary, this procedure may be repeated' tells you to do that again for A and B. In this case A beat B, so A wins.

If you needed to, iterating this process gives you a complete finishing order for the block - in this case this is conveniently alphabetical.


end