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Changing to the New System

If you were using the New System during 2015 as part of the East Anglian Croquet Federation trial, then keep your current handicap and handicap index and continue using them.

For players from all other federations, convert your existing handicap to the New System by applying whichever one of the following rules is most applicable to you:

  1. If your existing handicap is in the range 12 to 3 (inclusive), convert your index as follows:
    • If your existing handicap is between 12 and 6, keep your handicap and add 1100 to your existing index to get your new index.
    • If your existing handicap is 5, keep your handicap and add 1150 to your existing index.
    • If your existing handicap is 4 or 3, add 1200 to your existing index. If your new index is 1800 or above your new handicap becomes 2; otherwise keep your old handicap.

    Note for this rule: If you were below the trigger point for your current handicap before the change, you will remain below the trigger point on the new system. Your handicap should NOT be increased during the conversion.

  2. If your existing handicap is 12 and you have been struggling to get your index much above 0, ask your club handicapper to reset your handicap to 14 with a new index of 1050. Handicappers - see also Additional Guidance (below).
  3. A new complete beginner should be started on 16, 14, 12 or lower - see Setting Initial Handicap. Take their handicap index from the trigger point table (Table 1) for the handicap set. Please do not routinely start all new beginners on the same handicap. Handicappers - see also Additional Guidance (below).
  4. If your existing Actual Handicap is 2 or below and you have a current CGS Grade (ranking grade), take your current CGS Grade and use that for your new handicap index. Lookup your new handicap from the trigger point table (Table 1). Take the handicap of the next trigger point at or below your Grade. Note however that if this method would result in your handicap increasing, then instead keep your existing handicap but with the new index taken from Table 1 for that handicap. Handicappers - see also Additional Guidance (below).
  5. If your existing Actual Handicap is 2 or below and you DON'T have a current CGS Grade, then your new handicap should be set between your Actual and Effective Handicaps, with a starting handicap index set as follows:
    • a player with an Actual Handicap of 2 and an Effective Handicap of 0 become 1 (index of 1900)
    • a player with an Actual Handicap of 1 and an Effective Handicap of -2 become 0 (but with an index of 2050)
    • a player with an Actual Handicap of 0 and an Effective Handicap of -4 become -1 (but with an index of 2150)
    • a player with an Actual Handicap of -1 and an Effective Handicap of -5 become -2 (but with an index of 2250).

    It is believed there are relatively few players to whom this rule applies, and it is the least 'precise' of the rules. Handicappers will have to apply judgement in this category to ensure an appropriate handicap is set, especially where there is little recent recorded evidence to work from. Handicappers - see also Additional Guidance (below).

If you are uncertain how to apply these rules or have found a case which doesn't seem to fit any of them, please contact Martin French, the National Roll-Out Coordinator.

Once you have worked out your New System GC Handicap, please check your handicap shown on the CA Website - if it's not correct, please inform the CA Office of your new handicap.

Handicap Card

For 2016, the Handicap Committee has issued a new style of handicap card for both AC and GC. You may continue with a card you already have or start a new one, as you wish. The tables of trigger points and points exchanged in level play on the old cards will of course no longer apply. Instead, an A5 insert with the New System trigger points and points exchanged is available on your club noticeboard or can be downloaded.

Additional Guidance for Club, Federation and CA Handicappers

Rule (b) - High Handicappers

If a player's recorded evidence is erratic or very limited, you may want to use the Three Times Round test - see Setting Initial Handicap - to provide additional information on which to base your judgement. Although originally conceived as a way of setting initial handicaps for beginners, it can also provide useful information on existing high handicap players who only play occasionally. If you find it hard to judge the correct handicap to set, you can ask the player to show their card to you after 10, 20 and 30 more games, so you can check the handicap seems appropriate and make changes if not.

Rule (c) - Players New to GC

Use the Three Times Round test to set the handicap for a beginner, and the AC to GC handicap converter for players with an established AC handicap wishing to obtain a GC handicap. In both cases, see Setting Initial Handicap. Do not set all new beginners to the same default initial handicap, whether it be 16, 14 or 12! The Three Times Round test will help you spread your beginners over the range of appropriate handicaps.

If you find it hard to judge the correct handicap to set, or have your doubts about its accuracy, you can ask the player to show their card to you after 10, 20 and 30 more games, or have them repeat the Three Times Round test after a month, so you can check the handicap is appropriate and make changes if not.

Rules (d) and (e) - Lowest Handicap Players

If you are unfamiliar with the CGS Ranking List, be aware that although the "default" setting is to display only players who have played a minimum of 10 games in the past 12 months and who have a ranking grade of 1800 or more, players who do not meet these two criteria are still recorded within the system - and ranking information about them will help you set their new handicaps. Go to the CGS ranking system and in the top area 'Ranking List' set Min Games to 1, Min Grade to 1400 and Country to either UK or England. If you are still unable to find a club member who you know has played ranked Open GC games in the past, go down to the 'Player Full Record' area and enter their full name - this will find their details even if it was from several years ago.

If the player has played regularly in recent years and has what you consider to be a realistic CGS Grade and/ or Actual Handicap, use those to set their handicap following rules (d) or (e). The key principle here is that no player's handicap should increase above their old Actual Handicap during this conversion (and many will end up with a lower handicap).

The real difficulty is where the player has little evidence, especially no recent evidence, to base their new handicap upon. In the absence of any ranking information, rule (e) gives some guidance for those who have played recently enough to at least have 2014 or 2015 Actual and Effective Handicaps, and who have recorded at least 10 handicap games under that system.

Some Illustrations for Rules (d) and (e)

  1. If under the existing system you are a -1 Actual Handicap (-5 Effective Handicap) with a CGS Grade of 2383, you will start on the New System as a -3 with an index of 2383.
  2. If someone's CGS grade is say 1798 but they were a 1 Actual Handicap, they should not be changed into a 3 with a handicap index of 1798. Instead, they should remain as a 1 and be given an initial index of 1900.
  3. Example: A player who used to play a bit on the GC tournament circuit a few years ago (but not since four games in 2012) and hasn't played any competitive singles games since. His last recorded ranking grade was 2124. He can't find his last GC handicap card. He hasn't played any AC for the past 3 years either, but now plans to return to active play, and is in a similar state of health as before.

    Solution: If rule (d) was applied verbatim, he would become a -1 with an index of 2124. This would probably be too low a handicap. Instead, if his grade is "aged" 50 points for each of the 3 complete years since he last played, his grade would now be 1974, making him a 1 handicap (set the new handicap index to 1974 too).

  4. Example: A player who has had a long history of playing a great deal of GC at or near the top level, but whose health is now deteriorating significantly. His peak ranking grade was over 2300 and he was around 2100 for many years - he has suddenly fallen to around 1900 having played very few games last season, losing most. The -1 Actual Handicap he had in 2014 is probably now too low - it would be best to take the opportunity to reset him to be 1 or 2, with an index of 1900 or 1800.

Low handicap players with little recent handicap or ranking evidence will be the most problematic to set an accurate new system handicap for. If you have queries or want to discuss a particular case, please contact Martin French, the National Roll-Out Coordinator.

 

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