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The Laws of Association Croquet (7th Edition)


LAWS OF ASSOCIATION CROQUET

7th EDITION

Copyright © 2021 World Croquet Federation

TABLE OF CONTENTS

GLOSSARY

PART 1 INTRODUCTION

A A SUMMARY OF THE GAME

1 OBJECTIVE OF THE GAME

2 AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME

3 ADDITIONAL LAWS GOVERNING OTHER TYPES OF PLAY

B THE COURT AND EQUIPMENT

4 THE COURT

5 EQUIPMENT

6 ACCESSORIES

C GENERAL LAWS GOVERNING PLAY

7 START AND END OF A GAME AND TURN

8 PLAYING A STROKE AND DEFINITION OF THE STRIKING PERIOD

9 CHANGES IN THE STATUS OF A BALL

PART 2 LEVEL SINGLES PLAY

A LAWFUL PLAY

10 DECISIONS ABOUT THE ORDER OF PLAY

11 THE START OF A GAME

12 CHOICE OF STRIKER'S BALL

13 BALL OFF THE COURT

14 BALL IN THE YARD-LINE AREA

15 PLACEMENT OF A BALL ON THE YARD-LINE

16 WIRING LIFT

17 ROQUET

18 CROQUET STROKE

19 CONTINUATION STROKE

20 HOOP POINT

21 STRIKER'S BALL RUNNING ITS HOOP AND HITTING ANOTHER BALL

22 PEG POINT

B IRREGULARITIES IN PLAY

23 FORESTALLING PLAY

24 MULTIPLE ERRORS AND INTERFERENCES

C ERRORS IN PLAY

25 GENERAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING ERRORS

26 PLAYING WHEN NOT ENTITLED

27 PLAYING A WRONG BALL

28 PLAYING WHEN A BALL IS MISPLACED

29 FAULTS

D INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

30 GENERAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING INTERFERENCES

31 BALL WRONGLY REMOVED OR NOT REMOVED FROM THE GAME

32 PLAYER MISLED BY FALSE INFORMATION OR MISPLACED BALL OR CLIP

33 USING A BALL THAT IS AN OUTSIDE AGENCY

34 OUTSIDE AGENCY OR A PLAYER INTERFERING WITH A BALL DURING A STROKE

35 OUTSIDE AGENCY OR OPPONENT INTERFERING WITH THE PLAYING OF A STROKE

36 INTERFERENCE WITH A BALL BETWEEN STROKES

37 INTERFERENCE BY NATURAL FORCES OR FEATURES OF THE COURT AND ITS SURROUNDINGS

38 MISCELLANEOUS INTERFERENCE

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY

A ADVANCED SINGLES PLAY

39 OPTIONAL LIFT OR CONTACT

B SUPER-ADVANCED SINGLES PLAY

40 OPTIONAL LIFT OR CONTACT OR FREE PLACEMENT

41 RESTRICTED OPENING

C HANDICAP SINGLES PLAY

42 BISQUES

43 PEGGING OUT IN HANDICAP GAMES

44 RESTORATION OF BISQUES

D DOUBLES PLAY

45 ORDINARY LEVEL DOUBLES PLAY

46 ORDINARY ADVANCED OR SUPER-ADVANCED DOUBLES PLAY

47 ORDINARY HANDICAP DOUBLES PLAY

48 ALTERNATE STROKE LEVEL DOUBLES PLAY

49 ALTERNATE STROKE ADVANCED OR SUPER-ADVANCED DOUBLES PLAY

50 ALTERNATE STROKE HANDICAP DOUBLES PLAY

E SHORTENED GAMES

51 SHORTENED GAMES

52 ADVANCED PLAY IN SHORTENED GAMES

53 HANDICAP PLAY IN SHORTENED GAMES

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME

A GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

54 THE STATE OF THE GAME

55 RESPONSIBILITY FOR CONDUCT OF THE GAME

56 EXPEDITION IN PLAY

57 ADVICE AND AIDS

58 MISCELLANEOUS LAWS OF CONDUCT

B SPECIAL LAWS

59 DOUBLE-BANKED GAMES

60 TOURNAMENT AND MATCH PLAY

61 TIME-LIMITED GAMES

62 LOCAL LAWS

63 OVERRIDING LAW

TABLE 1: ADJUDICATING CLOSE POSITIONS: SUMMARY OF THE RULINGS

TABLE 2: LIMITS OF CLAIMS FOR ERRORS AND INTERFERENCES

Appendices

Appendix 1 Dimensions, tolerances and metric equivalents

Appendix 2 Ball performance specifications

Appendix 3 Full bisque handicap play

Appendix 4 Advanced handicap play

Appendix 5 One-ball play

Appendix 6 Short croquet

Appendix 7 Impasse Resolution Procedure

SCHEDULE 1: SCHEDULE OF BISQUES

INDEX

GLOSSARY

The terms set out below are listed alphabetically. Where a term is used in the Laws it is italicised the first time it occurs within each law. Italicised terms have the meaning assigned here rather than any alternative meaning. Terms defined here that are used elsewhere in this glossary are also italicised.

Ball at rest A ball in play that is stationary on the court. (Law 9.3)

Ball in hand A ball of the game that has been a ball in play but that the striker must place or may reposition on the court before the next stroke. A ball in hand is an outside agency. (Law 9.2)

Ball in play A ball of the game is a ball in play from the time it is placed on the court in the position from which it is played into the game until the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out, except for those periods when it is a ball in hand.

Baulk-lines Those portions of the yard-line that extend from the corner spots at corners I and III to their intersections with a line extended through the centres of hoops 5 and 6 are known as the A and B baulk-lines respectively. The ends of the baulk-lines may be marked on the court's boundary but any raised markers used must not intrude or lean into the court. See Diagram 1.

Bisque and half-bisque A bisque is an extra turn given to a player or side in handicap play. A half-bisque is a restricted bisque during which no point may be scored for any ball. (Law 42)

Body References to touching or other contact with a player or a player's body include all items, other than the mallet or clips, worn or carried by the player at the start of the stroke, which are treated as part of the player's body. Similarly, references to a part of the body include any clothing, shoes or gloves covering it.

Boundary The innermost edge of the marking or physical line used to define the perimeter of the court. The boundaries of a court are known as the north, south, east and west boundaries regardless of the geographical orientation of the court. See Diagram 1. (Law 4.3)

Cannon A croquet stroke in which the striker's ball and the ball from which croquet is to be taken are part of a group of balls. (Law 18.4)

Continuation stroke A stroke that is played when the striker is entitled to continue the turn after playing a croquet stroke or scoring a hoop point for the striker's ball, but is not required to take croquet immediately. (Law 19)

Corner flags Flags coloured blue, red, black and yellow mounted on posts about 12 inches (305 mm) high, optionally placed in corners I, II, III and IV respectively to define the corners. See Diagram 2. (Law 6.2)

Corner pegs White pegs, measuring about ¾ inch (19 mm) in diameter and about 3 inches (76 mm) in height above the ground, optionally placed on the boundary one yard (0.914 metres) from each corner (measured to the further side of the corner peg) to indicate the extent of the corner area. See Diagram 2. (Law 6.3)

Corner spot The point where two portions of the yard-line meet at right-angles. See Diagram 2.

Critical position A position in which a ball is at rest where a minor change in the position could materially affect future play. Examples include positions in or near hoops, wired positions, and positions on or near the yard-line or boundary.

Critical stroke Any stroke for which the striker's ball is in a critical position as far as the intended outcome of the stroke is concerned. (Laws 8.5, 36.2.2 and 36.2.3)

Croquet stroke A stroke that is played with the striker's ball in contact with another ball, except in circumstances where the striker's ball is in a lawful position in contact with a dead ball and the striker is required to play a continuation stroke.

Dead ball See Live and dead balls.

Discovery An error or interference is discovered when the striker or an active referee announces it, the opponent forestalls play in respect of it, or it is uncovered during investigation of another claimed irregularity. Discovery before a stroke means discovery before the stroke is played.

Double-banked games When two games are played simultaneously on a court they use differently coloured sets of balls and are said to be double-banked. (Law 59)

Error A mistake in play, made by the striker or a player acting as the striker, which may require rectification. The only errors are those defined by Laws 26 to 29 and, in alternate stroke doubles, Law 48.4.

Forestalling A player forestalls play to fulfil the player's responsibilities for the conduct of the game by requesting the striker to cease play. (Law 23)

Group of balls Either a 3-ball group or a 4-ball group. A 3-ball group is formed by one ball being in contact with two other balls. A 4-ball group is formed by the fourth ball being in contact with a 3-ball group. (Law 18.4)

Half-bisque See Bisque and half-bisque.

Hampered stroke A stroke in which the striker has to take special care because the swing of the mallet or the striker's normal stance is impeded by a hoop, the peg, or a ball not in contact with the striker's ball nor intended to be roqueted by it. (Law 29.2.3)

Hoop in order The hoop in order for a ball is the hoop that the ball is required to score next in the sequence and direction shown in Diagram 1.

Hoop point A point which a ball scores by passing through its hoop in order as a consequence of one or more strokes. (Law 20)

Interference An irregularity in play other than an error, caused by a player or an outside agency, which may need to be remedied. Interferences are defined by Laws 31 to 38.

Jaws of a hoop The space enclosed by and including the inner surfaces of the uprights, the surface created by raising a straight edge touching both hoop uprights on the playing side of the hoop from the ground to the crown of the hoop and the equivalent surface on the non-playing side of the hoop. (Laws 16.3, 20 and 21)

Lift hoops The hoops which, when scored by a player in advanced or super-advanced play, entitle the player of the next turn to begin that turn by optionally lifting a ball of that player's side and playing the first stroke of the turn as specified in the individual laws. (Laws 39, 40 and 52)

Limit of claims The point in time by which the discovery of an error or interference must occur if it is to be remedied.

Line of play The sequence of actions the striker adopts or attempts including, but not limited to: aiming to move a ball to a specific position on the court; choosing to play with a particular ball; making a particular leave; deciding how many points to score; quitting the court in the belief that the turn has ended; and, in handicap play, deciding whether to play a half-bisque or bisque under Law 42.7. It also includes the decision the opponent may be required to make on whether or not a fault should be rectified under Law 29.3.2.

Live and dead balls All balls other than the striker's ball are live at the start of each turn. A live ball may be roqueted and have croquet taken from it. A live ball becomes dead when croquet is taken from it and, within that turn, becomes live again when the striker's ball scores a hoop point. (Law 9.5)

Loose impediments Small items such as worm casts, leaves, nuts, refuse and similar material lying on the surface of the court. (Law 34.6.2)

Misplaced ball A ball of the game that is not in its lawful position on the court, except when it is a ball in hand or has been temporarily moved to avoid interference in accordance with Law 28.2.2.

Non-playing side of the hoop The side opposite to the playing side of the hoop in order for a ball. See Diagram 3.

Outside agency Any agency that may not lawfully affect play, apart from weather or the consequences of weather or, except in exceptional circumstances dealt with under the overriding law, loose impediments on the court. Examples include: animals; spectators; a referee; the players or equipment from another game; a ball in hand; a ball that is not a ball in play; a clip not attached to a hoop or the peg; the peg extension when not attached to the peg; and other stray objects. (Law 34.6.1)

Partner In ordinary doubles, the player of the side in play who is not the striker for the current turn. In alternate stroke doubles, the player of the side in play who is not the striker for the current stroke.

Partner ball The ball of the striker's side that is not the striker's ball for the current turn.

Peel To score a hoop point for any ball other than the striker's ball as a consequence of a stroke. (Law 5.3.4)

Playing side of the hoop The side of the hoop in order for a ball from which the ball runs the hoop to score the hoop point. See Diagram 3.

Playing characteristics (of a mallet) The mallet's effectiveness in playing different types of strokes. (Law 5.5.3)

Questionable stroke A stroke concerning which either the striker or the opponent suspects that its fairness or effect may be doubtful. Examples include, without limitation: a stroke in which a fault might be committed; an attempted roquet of a ball in a hoop; a distant peg-out; and any stroke that might cause a ball to leave the court when the striker is unable to ensure its accurate placement on the yard-line in a critical or potentially critical position. (Law 55.4)

Rectification The actions necessary to correct an error. Rectification involves replacing balls affected by strokes in error and the cancellation of points scored. (Law 25.3)

Redress The actions necessary to correct an interference under Laws 31 to 33. Redress is generally followed by a replay. (Laws 16.2.4, 30.3 and 31 to 33)

Replay A period of play involving one or more strokes as part of the remedy for an interference. Depending on the circumstances, in a replay the striker may be required to repeat the same stroke(s) with the same objectives as in the original play, to follow a different line of play from that taken originally, or to have a free choice of the stroke or strokes to play and their objectives. (Laws 31 to 35 and 38.2)

Roquet A contact between the striker's ball and a live ball during a stroke, except when the striker's ball has hit a different live ball earlier in the stroke. A roquet normally entitles the striker to extend the turn by taking croquet from the ball roqueted. (Laws 17 and 21)

Rover ball A ball that has scored all of its hoop points. (Law 2.5)

Single-ball stroke A stroke at the start of which the striker's ball is not in contact with another ball. (Laws 2.6.2 and 29.2.3.2)

Special damage Damage to the surface of the court other than the normal hazards of an indifferent court. Examples of special damage are: a hole on a corner spot; an unrepaired or imperfectly repaired divot, hoop hole or peg hole; a protruding tree root; and a sprinkler head. A depression due to wear in a hoop is not special damage. (Law 37.3)

State of the game Factual information about the game that includes, but is not limited to: which ball the striker has chosen as the striker's ball; the correct positions of the balls or clips; the colour of a ball or clip; whether an error or interference has been committed; which player is responsible for the position of a ball; whether a ball has been roqueted or hit or has moved; whether a ball has scored a hoop point or is clear of a given side of a hoop; whether there is an entitlement to a lift, contact or free placement; and the amount of time or number of bisques remaining. (Law 54)

Striker The player of the current turn, or of the current stroke in alternate stroke doubles.

Striker's ball The ball the striker chooses to play, or is required to play in accordance with these laws, during the current turn.

Striking period The period during which a fault under Law 29.1 may be committed. (Law 8)

Stroke The striker's attempt to hit a ball at rest with a mallet as part of a turn, or a declaration by the striker, made verbally or by gesture, that the ball will be left where it lies. A stroke includes any resulting movement of balls in play. (Law 8)

Strokes in error The stroke in which an error is committed and any subsequent strokes played before the error is discovered or its limit of claims is reached, whichever occurs first.

Taking croquet The striker takes croquet by playing a croquet stroke. The ball from which croquet is taken is known as the croqueted ball. (Law 18)

Wrong ball A wrong ball is played when the striker plays the first stroke of a turn with a ball in play that is not permitted to be the striker's ball for that turn, or a subsequent stroke with a ball in play that is not the striker's ball for the turn. (Laws 12 and 27)

Yard-line The unmarked line within the court one yard (0.914 metres) from and parallel to the nearest boundary. See Diagram 1.

Yard-line area The space between the boundary and the yard-line.

Yard-line ball A ball at rest on the yard-line. (Law 15)

The Standard Court

PART 1 INTRODUCTION

A A SUMMARY OF THE GAME

1 OBJECTIVE OF THE GAME

1.1 The game of Association Croquet is played between two sides, each side comprising one player in singles or two players in doubles. The objective of the game is for each side to make each ball belonging to the side score 12 hoop points and a peg point, a total of 26 points, before the other side. Shortened and/or time-limited games may be played.

2 AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME

2.1 The provisions of Law 2 are subject to the more detailed laws that follow.

2.2 HOW THE GAME IS PLAYED The game is played by striking a ball with a mallet. The two sides play alternate turns throughout the game, subject to the use of extra turns known as bisques in handicap play (see Law 42). The striker is the player of the current turn (or current stroke of the turn in alternate stroke doubles) and during that turn may strike only the striker's ball; striking the partner ball or a ball of the other side constitutes a wrong ball error. By striking the striker's ball, the striker may cause it and other balls to move and score hoop or peg points.

2.3 ALLOCATION OF BALLS One side plays the blue and black balls and the other the red and yellow balls (or green and brown versus pink and white; other colour combinations and/or markings are also permitted). In a game of singles or alternate stroke doubles each player may play either ball of the side. In a game of ordinary doubles each player of a side plays one ball and may strike only that ball; striking the partner's ball constitutes a wrong ball error.

2.4 SCORING HOOP POINTS A ball scores a hoop point (see Law 20) by passing through the correct hoop in the order and direction shown as hoops 1 to 12 in Diagram 1. The last six of these hoops are also known as 1-back, 2-back, 3-back, 4-back, penultimate and rover respectively.

2.5 SCORING A PEG POINT A ball may score a peg point only when it is a rover ball. A rover ball scores a peg point by hitting the peg; it is then said to be pegged out and is removed from the game. Only when the striker's ball is a rover ball may it cause another rover ball to score a peg point.

2.6 THE TURN

2.6.1 ENTITLEMENT TO PLAY EITHER BALL Once all of the balls have been played into the game, each turn may be played with either ball of the side until one of them has been pegged out.

2.6.2 FIRST STROKE In any turn, the striker is initially entitled to play one stroke which may be either a single-ball stroke or, if Law 2.6.3 is satisfied, a croquet stroke.

2.6.3 ENTITLEMENT TO TAKE CROQUET IN FIRST STROKE If the striker's ball is in contact with another ball at the start of the turn, or may be placed in contact with another ball before the first stroke as a result of the striker:

2.6.3.1 being required to play the ball into the game in one of the first four turns under Law 11 (start of game); or

2.6.3.2 being entitled to and taking a lift under Law 16 (wiring lift) or Law 39 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) or Law 40 (optional lift or contact or free placement in super-advanced play),

the striker is entitled to play a croquet stroke immediately, involving a ball that the striker nominates as the croqueted ball by playing the stroke.

2.6.4 ENTITLEMENT TO CONTINUE THE TURN When the outcome of the first stroke of the turn is a hoop point (see Law 20.3) or a roquet (see Law 17.1) or when that first stroke is a croquet stroke played in accordance with Law 2.6.3, the striker is entitled to continue the turn by playing further strokes in accordance with Laws 2.6.5 to 2.6.9, using the ball initially chosen as the striker's ball, until a turn-ending event occurs (see Law 7.6). It is thus possible for the striker to score one or more points during the turn. In all strokes subsequent to the first, the striker's ball is played from where it came to rest at the end of the preceding stroke unless the striker is required to take croquet or the ball must be repositioned on the court in accordance with Laws 13 to 15.

2.6.5 SCORING A HOOP POINT When the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself (see Law 20.3), the striker becomes entitled to play one extra stroke, which is known as a continuation stroke (see Law 19).

2.6.6 MAKING A ROQUET AND TAKING CROQUET Subject to the limitations specified in Law 17.2, when the striker's ball hits a live ball it is said to roquet that other ball (see Law 17.1) and the striker is then required to play a croquet stroke, taking croquet from the ball roqueted (see Law 18.1.1).

2.6.7 OTHER REQUIREMENT TO TAKE CROQUET The striker must also play a croquet stroke when the striker's ball is, or is lawfully finally placed, in contact with a live ball and the striker is entitled to continue the turn (see Law 18.1.2).

2.6.8 CONTINUING AFTER TAKING CROQUET After playing a croquet stroke, the striker becomes entitled to play a continuation stroke (see Law 19).

2.6.9 ENTITLEMENT TO CONTINUE FOLLOWING CONTINUATION STROKE The striker is entitled to continue the turn when the outcome of a continuation stroke is a hoop point or a roquet.

2.6.10 LIMITATION ON TAKING CROQUET DURING TURN The striker's ball may take croquet only once from each of the other balls in play during a turn unless it scores a hoop point for itself, in which case the right to roquet and take croquet once from each of the other balls in play is renewed.

3 ADDITIONAL LAWS GOVERNING OTHER TYPES OF PLAY

3.1 ADVANCED AND SUPER-ADVANCED PLAY Games played as advanced or super-advanced play are subject to additional laws - see Laws 39 to 41.

3.2 HANDICAP PLAY In handicap play, the side with the higher handicap receives a number of extra turns known as bisques - see Laws 42 to 44 for additional laws governing this type of play.

3.3 DOUBLES PLAY A game that is played as doubles is subject to additional laws - see Laws 45 to 50.

3.4 TOURNAMENT AND MATCH PLAY In tournament and match play, special laws and regulations apply - see Laws 60 and 61.

B THE COURT AND EQUIPMENT

4 THE COURT

4.1 THE STANDARD COURT

4.1.1 The standard court is a rectangle measuring 28 by 35 yards (25.6 by 32.0 metres). Its corners are known as I, II, III and IV. See Diagram 1.

4.1.2 The length and width of the court are each subject to a tolerance of ± 6 inches (152 mm).

4.2 SMALLER COURTS If the available area is too small for a standard court, a smaller court may be laid out with the same proportions as the standard court but using a length unit smaller than the standard 7 yards (6.40 metres). The appropriate organising body may approve other proportions and dimensions.

4.3 BOUNDARIES

4.3.1 The boundaries must be clearly marked. Where more than one boundary marking is visible and it is not obvious which one should be used, the most recent defines the actual boundary or, if that cannot be determined, the innermost defines the actual boundary. Exceptional cases may be dealt with under the overriding law (see Law 63). If the boundary marking is not straight, the actual boundary at any point is the straight line which best fits the inner edge of the boundary marking in the vicinity of that point.

4.3.2 The boundary may be marked with a movable cord fastened to the ground in a manner that minimises the risk of it becoming displaced. If the cord is displaced, Law 38.4 applies.

4.4 PEG AND HOOPS

4.4.1 Subject to the variation in position permitted under Law 4.4.3, the peg is set in the centre of the court.

4.4.2 There are six hoops which are set parallel to the north and south boundaries. Subject to the variation in positions permitted under Law 4.4.3, the centres of the two inner hoops are 7 yards (6.40 metres) to the north and south of the peg; the centres of the four outer hoops are 7 yards (6.40 metres) from the adjacent boundaries.

4.4.3 The positions of each hoop and the peg are subject to a tolerance of up to 12 inches (305 mm) provided that the lines joining the centres of hoops 1 and 2, 3 and 4, and 5 and 6 remain visually parallel to the east and west boundaries, and that the peg lies on the lines joining the centres of hoops 1 and 3, 2 and 4, and 5 and 6.

4.5 ACCEPTANCE OF SETTING Once the players start a game, the positions of all boundary markings, hoops and the peg may be changed only if a material discrepancy is discovered. The overriding law (Law 63) applies if the balance of the game is disturbed by doing so.

5 EQUIPMENT

5.1 THE PEG

5.1.1 SPECIFICATION The peg is a rigid cylinder with a height above the ground of 18 inches (457 mm) and a uniform diameter of 1½ inches (38 mm). The tolerance for the height is ± 1 inch (25 mm). The tolerance for the diameter is ± ¼ inch (6 mm). The peg must be vertical and firmly fixed.

5.1.2 COLOURING The peg must be painted white to a height of at least 6 inches (152 mm) above the ground and may have blue, red, black and yellow, and/or green, pink, brown and white, bands descending in that order from the top.

5.1.3 EXTENSION The extension to the peg is approximately 6 inches (152 mm) in length and ½ inch (13 mm) in diameter. Its purpose is to hold clips and it must be fixed detachably to the top of the peg. The extension is not part of the peg for the purposes of Law 22 (peg point) and may be temporarily removed at any time by the striker (see Law 38.3 if a ball hits the extension). When not attached to the peg, the extension is an outside agency.

5.1.4 ADJUSTMENT Subject to any relevant provisions in the tournament regulations (see Law 60.1), at any time during the game either player is entitled to require that a leaning peg be straightened. Such a request is treated as forestalling play for the purposes of Law 23.4. Any test required for the purpose of determining wiring (see Law 16) must be carried out before any adjustment is made. After any such adjustment, the positions of the balls must be adjusted if necessary to ensure that the striker gains no advantage thereby. The straightening of the peg may not cause a ball at rest to be pegged out (see Law 22.2.7).

5.2 HOOPS

5.2.1 SPECIFICATION

5.2.1.1 Each hoop is made of solid metal and consists of two uprights connected by a crown. The crown must be straight and at right-angles to the uprights. A hoop must be 12 inches (305 mm) in height above the ground measured to the top of the crown. The tolerance for the height is + ½ inch / - 1 inch (+ 13 mm / - 25 mm). The hoop must be vertical and firmly fixed.

5.2.1.2 The uprights and the crown must have a uniform diameter above the ground of between 5/8 inch (16 mm) and 3/4 inch (19 mm), with a tolerance of 1/16 inch (1.6 mm), although minor deviations at the top and bottom of the uprights are permitted. Alternatively, the crown of the hoop may be of square cross-section with sides of between 5/8 inch (16 mm) and 3/4 inch (19 mm), with a tolerance of 1/16 inch (1.6 mm) and with rounded edges.

5.2.1.3 The inner surfaces of the uprights must be approximately parallel and not less than 3 11/16 inches (94 mm) or more than 4 inches (102 mm) apart. In tournament and match play, the organising body may specify a narrower internal width as either the distance between the uprights or the gap between a ball and the inner surface of one upright when the ball is half way through the hoop on the ground and is touching the other upright. Each hoop on a court must have the same width within a tolerance of 1/32 inch (0.8 mm); a smaller tolerance may be specified for tournament and match play.

5.2.2 COLOURING The hoops may be left unpainted or coloured white and, in addition, the crown of the first hoop may be coloured blue and that of the final hoop may be coloured red. It is permissible for the hoops to be coloured as required for Golf Croquet.

5.2.3 ADJUSTMENT

5.2.3.1 Subject to any relevant provisions in the tournament regulations (see Law 60.1), the striker is entitled at any time during a turn to require that an incorrectly aligned or loose hoop be adjusted and that the width and height of a hoop be checked and corrected if necessary.

5.2.3.2 The striker is entitled to have the height of a hoop adjusted, even if it is within the range specified in Law 5.2.1.1, if any part of the hoop's base that is wider than the uprights would affect the swing of the mallet or the passage of a ball in the next stroke. No consequential adjustment of the position of any ball is to be made. Furthermore, a part of the hoop's base that is wider than the uprights is to be ignored when testing whether one ball is wired from another.

5.2.3.3 Any test to determine the position of a ball in relation to a hoop must be carried out before the hoop is checked or adjusted under Laws 5.2.3.1 or 5.2.3.2.

5.2.3.4 After any adjustment to the alignment of a hoop under Law 5.2.3.1, the positions of the balls must be adjusted if necessary to ensure that the striker gains no advantage thereby. The adjustment of a hoop may not cause a ball at rest to score or lose a hoop point (see Law 20.4.3).

5.3 BALLS

5.3.1 SPECIFICATION A ball must be 3 5/8 inches (92 mm) in diameter with a tolerance of ± 1/32 inch (0.8 mm) and must weigh 16 ounces (454 g) with a tolerance of ± ¼ ounce (7 g). The rebound and playing characteristics of each ball in the set of balls used in a game must comply with the requirements of Appendix 2 and be similar to each other within the specified tolerances.

5.3.2 TEMPORARY REMOVAL During a turn the striker is entitled to remove a ball between strokes in order to wipe it, avoid interference or exchange it when it is faulty or damaged. Before removal, the striker must mark the position of the ball accurately and, if it is in a critical position, agree its position with the opponent or a referee in accordance with Law 55.3.

5.3.3 KEEPING IN POSITION The striker may touch or steady a ball or apply such pressure as is reasonably necessary to make it hold its position. Grass clippings or similar material may also be used, but should be removed after use.

5.3.4 PRESERVING ROTATIONAL ALIGNMENT The striker may not rotate a ball before attempting to peel it. If the striker wishes to remove or steady a ball immediately before attempting a peel, its rotational alignment must be noted and preserved.

5.4 CLIPS

5.4.1 SPECIFICATION Clips, with colours corresponding to those of the balls in the game, are used to indicate the score. They may be made of any suitable material. They must be able to be securely fastened to a hoop or the peg extension but be readily removable.

5.4.2 USE At the start of each turn the hoop or peg next in order for each ball should carry a clip of the corresponding colour. When a ball scores that point, the striker must remove the clip and, at the end of the turn, place it on the appropriate hoop or the peg. The clip is placed on the crown for the first 6 hoops and on an upright for the last 6. When a peg point is scored the clip is removed from the court.

5.4.3 REMOVAL A clip may be removed at any time by the striker and must be removed if it is likely to influence the path of a ball in the next stroke. Law 38.3 applies if a ball hits a clip.

5.4.4 CLIPS AS OUTSIDE AGENCIES Any clip, whether or not it belongs to the game, is an outside agency when it is not attached to a hoop or the peg or the striker, including when it is falling to or lying on the court surface.

5.5 MALLETS

5.5.1 STRUCTURE A mallet consists of a head with a shaft firmly connected to its mid-point and at right-angles to it for at least the bottom 12 inches (305 mm), so that they function as one unit during play. Alternative but equivalent arrangements are permitted provided the playing characteristics of the mallet do not depend on which end-face of the head is used to strike a ball.

5.5.2 GRIP A grip of any material may be attached to the shaft, but neither it nor the shaft shall be moulded with an impression of any part of the player's hands.

5.5.3 HEAD The head must be rigid and may be made of any suitable materials. It must have essentially identical playing characteristics regardless of which end is used to strike the ball. The parts of the ends that are flat are known as the end-faces. These must be parallel and identical, though fine grooves and minor deviations are permitted. Both the end-faces and their edges must be of a shape and material unlikely to damage the balls. The edges of the end-faces, however they are bevelled or shaped, are not part of the end-faces for the purposes of these laws.

5.5.4 AIMING DEVICES No mirrors, pointers or other devices intended to assist the aiming or playing of a stroke may be attached to any part of the mallet. The shaft need not be straight, however, and the head may bear sighting lines.

5.5.5 DISABLED PLAYERS A disabled player may use a mallet with an appropriately modified shaft or artificial aids provided that no advantage is gained thereby compared to a player without that disability using a conventional mallet.

5.5.6 EXCHANGE

5.5.6.1 A mallet may not be exchanged for another during a turn unless it is no longer available or its use is significantly affected by accidental damage or a mechanical or structural fault that occurred or was discovered during the turn. A damaged mallet may be used only if the player gains no advantage thereby. If the head is detachable from the shaft, neither may be exchanged except as provided in this law.

5.5.6.2 The playing characteristics of a mallet may never be changed during a turn, except to restore its initial state following a change to it. Changing the grip to enable the player to cope with different weather conditions does not constitute altering the playing characteristics. If a mallet is exchanged for another under Law 5.5.6.1 the playing characteristics of the replacement need not be the same as those of the original.

6 ACCESSORIES

6.1 PURPOSE The accessories specified below may be supplied for guidance, convenience and decoration. They are outside agencies and may be removed temporarily at any time by the striker.

6.2 CORNER FLAGS If corner flags are used to mark the corners, their mounting posts must touch the corner but must not intrude or lean into the court.

6.3 CORNER PEGS If corner pegs are used to indicate the limits of the corner area, they must be placed so that they are touching the boundary and with the further side of the peg one yard (0.914 metres) from the corner. They must not intrude or lean into the court.

The Corner Square

C GENERAL LAWS GOVERNING PLAY

7 START AND END OF A GAME AND TURN

7.1 WHEN A GAME STARTS A game and its first turn start when the first stroke is played in accordance with Law 11.1.

7.2 WHEN A GAME ENDS A game ends when, in agreement as to which side has won, the players quit the court or start another game on it.

7.3 WINNER A game is won:

7.3.1 by the side whose balls are first both pegged out; or

7.3.2 in accordance with Law 61.1.7 if the game is subject to a time limit and neither side has both balls pegged out when play ceases after the time limit has been reached.

7.4 WHEN A TURN STARTS All turns subsequent to the first start when the preceding turn ends in accordance with Law 7.5.

7.5 WHEN A TURN ENDS A turn ends and, unless the game has been won, a new turn starts when:

7.5.1 one of the events causing end of turn, as defined in Law 7.6, occurs, the last stroke of the turn has ended and the balls and clips are correctly positioned; or

7.5.2 the opponent plays a stroke after the striker has either:

7.5.2.1 quitted the court in the belief that the requirements of Law 7.5.1 have been met; or

7.5.2.2 permitted the opponent to play a stroke by mutual agreement or under Law 38.1.

In time-limited games this definition of end of turn is subject to Law 61.1.2.

7.6 EVENTS CAUSING END OF TURN A turn ends if:

7.6.1 in a stroke other than a croquet stroke, the striker's ball neither makes a roquet nor scores a hoop point for itself; or

7.6.2 in a croquet stroke either ball is sent off the court as specified in Law 18.7; or

7.6.3 in any stroke the striker's ball or a ball roqueted in that stroke is pegged out; or

7.6.4 the striker plays a stroke by declaring that the ball will be left where it lies; or

7.6.5 the striker plays a half-bisque or bisque prematurely and the opponent fails to forestall play (but see Law 42.5, which specifies the opponent's obligations); or

7.6.6 the striker quits the court in the mistaken belief that the turn has ended and the opponent plays a stroke (but see Law 23.2.4, which specifies the opponent's obligations, and Law 38.1, which covers what happens if the players realise the mistake before the opponent plays a stroke); or

7.6.7 in any stroke the striker commits an error for which the penalty is end of turn (see Laws 26, 27, 28.4 and 29); or

7.6.8 it is so required after play is cancelled as part of the redress for an interference (see Laws 31 to 33); or

7.6.9 a ruling is made to that effect under the overriding law (Law 63).

8 PLAYING A STROKE AND DEFINITION OF THE STRIKING PERIOD

8.1 WHEN A STROKE MAY BE PLAYED

8.1.1 A stroke may lawfully be played when all balls in play are balls at rest or one or more such balls have been moved to avoid interference under Law 28.2.2.

8.1.2 Notwithstanding Law 8.1.1, a stroke may be played before the preceding stroke has ended provided the striker's ball is at rest in a lawful position and to do so would not affect the outcome of either stroke.

8.2 WHEN A STROKE AND THE STRIKING PERIOD START A stroke and the striking period start when the striker takes a stance with apparent intent to play the stroke or starts again to swing the mallet while remaining in the stance used in the previous stroke.

8.3 PLAYING A STROKE Once a stroke has been started, unless it is cancelled in accordance with Law 8.4.1 or there is accidental contact between the mallet and a ball as described in Law 8.5.2, the stroke is played when:

8.3.1 the mallet touches the striker's ball; or

8.3.2 a fault is committed; or

8.3.3 the mallet misses or does not reach the striker's ball when attempting to strike it.

8.4 CANCELLING A STROKE WITHOUT CONTACTING A BALL

8.4.1 The striker may cancel the stroke and the striking period after they have started and before the stroke is played by:

8.4.1.1 stepping away from the stance under control; or

8.4.1.2 stopping or diverting the mallet, after having begun to swing it for the purpose of striking the striker's ball, in a successful attempt to avoid hitting the ball or committing a fault.

8.4.2 The striker may then start another stroke and striking period without penalty.

8.5 ACCIDENTAL CONTACT BETWEEN MALLET AND BALL

8.5.1 CRITICAL STROKES

8.5.1.1 In a critical stroke any contact between the mallet and a ball is a stroke.

8.5.1.2 Law 8.5.1.1 does not apply if the ball contacted is the striker's ball and it has been marked by a referee or to the joint satisfaction of the players before the stroke. In such circumstances, the stroke shall be treated under Law 8.5.2 as non-critical.

8.5.2 NON-CRITICAL STROKES In a non-critical stroke accidental contact between the mallet and a ball before the striker intended to strike the striker's ball does not of itself constitute playing a stroke. After such accidental contact, Laws 8.5.2.1 to 8.5.2.3 apply.

8.5.2.1 The striker must, if aware of the accidental contact, attempt to avoid any further contact between the mallet and the striker's ball during the striking period.

8.5.2.2 Nevertheless, if there is a further contact between the end-face of the mallet and the striker's ball in the swing in which the striker intends to strike it, the stroke is played. Any prior accidental contact is ignored for the purposes of determining whether a fault was committed but is otherwise treated as part of the stroke.

8.5.2.3 If Law 8.5.2.2 does not apply, the stroke is annulled. Any balls moved must be replaced and the striker may start a new stroke and striking period, except that the new stroke may not be any critical stroke that could have been an alternative to the annulled stroke.

8.5.3 BETWEEN STROKES An accidental contact between the mallet and any ball between strokes is covered by Law 36.

8.5.4 ADJUDICATING CLOSE POSITIONS If a stroke that is about to be, or has just been, played is agreed between the players, or decided by a referee, to be borderline between being critical or not critical, it shall be considered a critical stroke.

8.6 WHEN THE STRIKING PERIOD ENDS The striking period ends when the striker quits the stance under control. If the striker does not quit the stance before playing the next stroke, the striking period ends when the next stroke starts.

8.7 WHEN A STROKE ENDS A stroke ends when every ball moved as a consequence of the stroke has come to rest, left the court, or been moved, picked up or arrested in its course under Laws 17.3.1 or 22.3.2 when the state of the game will not be affected by doing so.

8.8 DECLARATION OF A STROKE

8.8.1 The striker may declare verbally or by gesture that the striker's ball will be left where it lies. That declaration shall count as a stroke and may be made when a stroke may be played under Law 8.1.

8.8.2 The striker must indicate to which ball of the side a declaration applies if the striker has a choice under Law 12.

8.9 OTHER CONTACT BETWEEN MALLET AND BALL Where the laws allow or require a ball to be repositioned between strokes, a mallet may be used to do so.

9 CHANGES IN THE STATUS OF A BALL

9.1 BALL IN PLAY A ball becomes a ball in play when placed on the court in the position from which it is played into the game under Law 11. Law 28.7 applies if the ball is played into the game from a position materially other than a point on a baulk-line when it is required to be played from a baulk-line. It ceases to be a ball in play while it is a ball in hand to be repositioned on the court or at the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out.

9.2 BALL IN HAND

9.2.1 Once any ball has first become a ball in play, it becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency when:

9.2.1.1 it is temporarily removed under Law 5.3.2; or

9.2.1.2 it leaves the court; or

9.2.1.3 it is moved in preparation for a cannon under Law 18.4; or

9.2.1.4 it must be replaced as part of the remedy for an error or interference.

9.2.2 In addition to the circumstances specified in Law 9.2.1, the striker's ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency:

9.2.2.1 when it is lifted under Laws 16 (wiring lift), 39 (optional lift or contact) or 40 (optional lift or contact or free placement); or

9.2.2.2 when it is moved, picked up or arrested under Laws 17.3.1 or 22.3.2; or

9.2.2.3 when the striker is required to play a croquet stroke in any of the situations specified in Law 18.1; or

9.2.2.4 at the end of the last stroke of a turn if it comes to rest in the yard-line area.

9.2.3 In addition to the circumstances specified in Law 9.2.1, a ball other than the striker's ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency at the end of a stroke if it comes to rest in the yard-line area.

9.2.4 A ball ceases to be a ball in hand and an outside agency when it becomes a ball at rest as specified in Law 9.3.1.2.

9.3 BALL AT REST

9.3.1 A ball becomes a ball at rest when:

9.3.1.1 having moved as a consequence of a stroke, it comes to rest in accordance with Law 9.4 and has not become a ball in hand; or

9.3.1.2 having been a ball in hand it is placed in a lawful position on the court or, if left on the court in either a lawful or a misplaced position, at the start of the next stroke. If there is a choice of positions, however, the striker may return it to hand and relocate it at any time until the earlier of the start of the next stroke or the end of that turn.

9.3.2 A ball ceases to be a ball at rest when it is caused to move as a consequence of a stroke or becomes a ball in hand.

9.4 WHEN A BALL COMES TO REST For the purposes of these laws, a ball comes to rest:

9.4.1 if it is in a critical position that needs to be tested, when its position has been agreed upon by the players or adjudicated by the players or a referee; or

9.4.2 if it is in a critical position that does not need to be tested, when its position has apparently remained unchanged for at least 5 seconds; or

9.4.3 otherwise when it appears to have stopped moving.

9.5 LIVE AND DEAD BALLS

9.5.1 A ball other than the striker's ball is defined as being live or dead for the sole purpose of determining whether it may be roqueted and have croquet taken from it.

9.5.2 At the start of every turn all balls other than the striker's ball are live balls and may be roqueted and have croquet taken from them. A ball becomes a dead ball when croquet has been taken from it.

9.5.3 A dead ball becomes live again when the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself or the turn ends, whichever occurs earlier.

9.5.4 The striker's ball hitting a dead ball does not constitute a roquet.

9.5.5 The striker's ball may not take croquet from a dead ball. Playing such a stroke constitutes an error under Law 28.4.

PART 2 LEVEL SINGLES PLAY

A LAWFUL PLAY

10 DECISIONS ABOUT THE ORDER OF PLAY

10.1 The players determine which side makes the first decision about play by tossing a coin, or an equivalent procedure.

10.2 The side winning the toss decides whether to take the choice of lead, which includes the right to play second, or the choice of balls. If the side winning the toss takes the choice of lead, the other side has the choice of balls and vice versa. When a match consists of more than one game, the right to make the first choice alternates after the first game.

10.3 Once validly made, a choice may not be revoked, although if a sequence of wrong ball errors occurs at the start of a game the initial choice of balls is reversed under Law 27.6.

11 THE START OF A GAME

11.1 THE FIRST TURN To start the game, the player entitled to play first places one of the balls of that side on any point on either baulk-line and plays the first stroke of the turn. In handicap play, at the end of the turn, the striker is entitled to exercise the options for taking bisques specified in Law 42.3.2.

11.2 PLAYING THE OTHER BALLS INTO THE GAME

11.2.1 THE SECOND TURN After the end of the first turn, the player entitled to play second places one of the balls of that side on any unoccupied point on either baulk-line and plays it into the game. If the other ball in play is either on or sufficiently close to the baulk-line so that the striker's ball may be placed on the baulk-line in contact with that other ball, the first stroke of the turn may be played by taking croquet immediately from that ball under Law 18.1.3.2. In handicap play, at the end of the turn, the striker is entitled to exercise the options for taking bisques specified in Law 42.3.2.

11.2.2 THE THIRD AND FOURTH TURNS In the third and fourth turns, the remaining two balls are played into the game by the respective sides in a similar manner to the second ball, subject to the options specified in Laws 11.2.2.1 to 11.2.2.3.

11.2.2.1 If the ball to be played into the game can contact another ball when placed on the baulk-line, the striker may take croquet immediately from that other ball under Law 18.1.3.2, but is not entitled to take croquet immediately from any other ball in a group of which the two balls may form part.

11.2.2.2 In advanced play or super-advanced play, if the striker is entitled to a contact in accordance with Laws 39.4 or 40.4, the ball may be played into the game by taking croquet immediately from any ball in play as an alternative to being played from a baulk-line.

11.2.2.3 In super-advanced play, if the striker is entitled to a free placement in accordance with Law 40.6, the ball may be played into the game from any unoccupied position on the court.

11.2.3 Should the player of the fourth turn be unable to play the correct ball, the game must be restarted in accordance with Law 27.5.

12 CHOICE OF STRIKER'S BALL

12.1 RIGHT TO PLAY EITHER BALL After all four balls have been played into the game under Law 11, the striker may choose at the start of any turn to play that turn with either ball of the side, unless one of them has been pegged out. Law 42.1 modifies this law for handicap play.

12.2 HOW CHOICE IS MADE The striker's ball is chosen by:

12.2.1 playing a stroke; or

12.2.2 lifting a ball of the side:

12.2.2.1 when entitled to take a wiring lift with that ball under Law 16; or

12.2.2.2 that is neither in contact with the partner ball nor part of a group of balls that also includes the partner ball when entitled to take an optional lift or contact in advanced play under Law 39, or an optional lift, contact or free placement in super-advanced play under Law 40.

In each case the ball so chosen becomes the striker's ball for that turn and the striker may not then strike the partner ball. Doing so constitutes a wrong ball error and Law 27 applies.

12.3 LIFTING A BALL For the purposes of Law 12.2.2 a player lifts a ball by deliberately moving it from its position in any manner other than that used for playing a stroke.

13 BALL OFF THE COURT

13.1 WHEN A BALL LEAVES THE COURT

13.1.1 A ball leaves the court as soon as any part of it would touch a straight edge raised vertically from the boundary. It then becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency.

13.1.2 If a determination of whether a ball is on or off the court concludes that within the limits of observation the position is on the borderline between being on and off the court, the decision shall be that the ball is off the court.

13.2 CONSULTING A REFEREE OR THE OPPONENT The striker must consult in accordance with Law 55.3 before testing whether a ball is off the court.

14 BALL IN THE YARD-LINE AREA

14.1 THE STRIKER'S BALL If the striker's ball is in the yard-line area at the end of a stroke it is played from where it lies unless the striker is entitled to take croquet. Only at the end of the last stroke of a turn does the striker's ball in the yard-line area become a ball in hand. It is then placed on the yard-line in accordance with Law 15.

14.2 BALLS OTHER THAN THE STRIKER'S BALL At the end of each stroke, any ball other than the striker's ball that is in the yard-line area becomes a ball in hand and is placed on the yard-line in accordance with Law 15.

15 PLACEMENT OF A BALL ON THE YARD-LINE

15.1 PLACEMENT WHEN OTHER BALLS AT REST DO NOT INTERFERE Except for the striker's ball in hand in preparation for a croquet stroke, before the next stroke:

15.1.1 any ball in hand that has left the court must be placed on the yard-line at the point nearest to where it left the court; and

15.1.2 any ball in hand in the yard-line area must be placed on the yard-line at the point nearest to where it came to rest.

15.2 PLACEMENT WHEN OTHER BALLS AT REST INTERFERE If a ball cannot be placed in accordance with Law 15.1 because of the presence of:

15.2.1 the striker's ball inside the yard-line area; or

15.2.2 one or more yard-line balls, or balls outside the yard-line area

it must be placed on the yard-line in contact with any ball that directly or indirectly interferes with its placement in whichever position the striker chooses.

15.3 DIRECT AND INDIRECT INTERFERENCE

15.3.1 A ball at rest directly interferes with the placement of a ball on the yard-line if the ball at rest prevents the ball from being placed in accordance with Law 15.1.

15.3.2 A ball at rest indirectly interferes with the placement of a ball on the yard-line if the ball at rest does not directly interfere with the placement but is in contact with, or very close to, another ball at rest that either directly or indirectly interferes with the placement.

15.4 INTERFERENCE BY THE STRIKER'S BALL If the striker is entitled to take croquet, the striker's ball is a ball in hand and must not interfere with the placement of a ball under Laws 15.1 or 15.2.

15.5 ORDER OF PLACEMENT If two or more balls have to be placed, the order of placement is as the striker chooses.

15.6 HOW TO PLACE The striker must take special care to ensure that balls are accurately placed on the yard-line and must place them while facing outwards from the court unless there is a choice of placement positions under Law 15.2.

15.7 REQUIREMENT FOR YARD-LINE BALLS TO LIE ON A STRAIGHT LINE If yard-line balls that should lie on a straight line are found not to, their positions should be adjusted by the minimum amount to ensure that they do so, with none of them less than one yard (0.914 metres) from the adjacent boundary.

15.8 CONSULTING A REFEREE OR THE OPPONENT The striker must consult in accordance with Law 55.3 before placing a ball if there is doubt whether it may have to be placed in contact with another ball. The striker should inform the opponent whether the placement has resulted in the balls being in contact, or close together but not touching.

15.9 PLACEMENT VERY CLOSE TO ONE OR MORE OTHER BALLS If a determination of the placement of a ball on the yard-line in accordance with this law concludes that, within the limits of observation of determining or judging the ball's position, the position is on the borderline between being in contact with one or more other balls and not in contact with it or them, the ball shall be placed where it is not in contact with the other ball or balls.

16 WIRING LIFT

16.1 LIFT At the start of a turn, if the opponent is responsible for the position of a ball of the striker's side which is not in contact with another ball and is wired from all other balls, as defined in Law 16.3, the striker may:

16.1.1 play as the balls lie; or

16.1.2 lift the wired ball and play it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line. If the lifted ball can contact another ball when so placed on the baulk-line, the striker may take croquet immediately from that ball under Law 18.1.3.2, but is not entitled to take croquet immediately from any other ball in a group of which the two balls may form part.

16.2 RESPONSIBILITY FOR POSITION

16.2.1 GENERAL A ball's position is the responsibility of the player who most recently played a stroke:

16.2.1.1 with that ball as the striker's ball; or

16.2.1.2 that moved or shook that ball; or

16.2.1.3 that was a croquet stroke or cannon involving that ball even if that ball did not move.

16.2.2 SPECIAL CASES If a player starts a turn by:

16.2.2.1 playing an opponent's ball, the player of the wrong ball also becomes responsible for the positions of both balls of the player's side; or

16.2.2.2 declaring a stroke to have been played, that player becomes responsible for the position of the ball nominated, or of both balls of the player's side if neither is specified.

16.2.3 ERRORS Law 16.2.1 applies to strokes in error, even if the ball is replaced when rectifying the error.

16.2.4 INTERFERENCES Law 30.3 governs responsibility for the positions of balls affected by an interference.

16.3 WHEN WIRED A ball ("the relevant ball") is wired from another ball ("the target ball") if:

16.3.1 any part of a hoop or the peg would impede the direct course of any part of the relevant ball towards any part of the target ball; or

16.3.2 the relevant ball would have to pass through a hoop to hit any part of the target ball; or

16.3.3 any part of a hoop or the peg would impede the swing of the mallet before its impact with the relevant ball; or

16.3.4 any part of the relevant ball lies within the jaws of a hoop.

16.4 IMPEDED SWING

16.4.1 In Law 16.3.3, the swing is impeded if there is any part of an end-face of the mallet specified in Law 16.4.2 with which the striker would be unable to strike the centre of the relevant ball in order to drive it freely with the striker's normal swing towards any part of the target ball. The swing is not impeded merely because a hoop or the peg interferes with the striker's stance.

16.4.2 The mallet to be used in the test described in Law 16.4.1 is the mallet the striker last used before the relevant ball assumed its current position.

16.5 TESTING

16.5.1 The striker must consult in accordance with Law 55.3 if claiming a wiring lift.

16.5.2 A test to determine whether a relevant ball is entitled to a wiring lift may be conducted only before the first stroke of a turn at the request of the striker and when the opponent is responsible for the position of the relevant ball. Otherwise a player must rely on an ocular test aided by nothing more than spectacles or contact lenses to check whether one ball is wired from another.

16.5.3 If an adjudication of whether one ball is wired from another concludes that within the limits of observation the position is on the borderline between being wired and not wired, the decision shall be that the ball is wired.

16.6 CHANGE OF DECISION If the striker lifts a ball of the striker's side when entitled to do so under Law 16.1.2, Laws 16.6.1 and 16.6.2 apply.

16.6.1 The ball lifted is thereby chosen as the striker's ball and the striker may not then play with the other ball of the side; Law 27 applies should the striker do so. In addition, the striker is obliged to take the lift in accordance with Law 16.1.2 and may not then play the lifted ball from where it lay before it was lifted unless it already lay on a baulk-line.

16.6.2 The ball lifted becomes a ball in hand and the striker remains entitled to play it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line until the first stroke of the turn is played, whether or not it had been placed either in contact with another ball or forming part of a group of balls.

17 ROQUET

17.1 WHEN A ROQUET IS MADE The striker's ball makes a roquet when there is any contact between it and a live ball during and as a consequence of a stroke, subject to the limitations described in Law 17.2.

17.2 LIMITATIONS

17.2.1 Once the striker's ball has made a roquet on a live ball, any contact with a different live ball in that stroke does not constitute a roquet.

17.2.2 If the striker's ball hits two or more live balls simultaneously, a roquet is made only on whichever of those balls the striker nominates as the roqueted ball by taking croquet from it. If no such nomination is made Law 28.6 applies.

17.2.3 If the striker's ball simultaneously hits a live ball and the peg in order, Law 22.2.2 applies.

17.2.4 A roquet may be made by the striker's ball on a live ball during a croquet stroke except as provided in Law 21.4.2.

17.3 CONSEQUENCES OF A ROQUET If the striker's ball makes a roquet:

17.3.1 it remains a ball in play throughout the stroke and may therefore cause other balls to move and score hoop or peg points; accordingly, it may be moved, picked up or arrested in its course only if the state of the game will not be affected thereby; and

17.3.2 it can score a hoop point for itself in the same stroke only in the hoop and roquet situation covered by Law 21.2; and

17.3.3 it cannot score a peg point for itself thereafter in the same stroke; and

17.3.4 unless the striker's turn has ended (see Law 7.6), it becomes a ball in hand at the end of the stroke and the striker must take croquet under Law 18.

18 CROQUET STROKE

18.1 REQUIREMENT TO TAKE CROQUET If the striker is entitled to play a stroke, the striker must take croquet:

18.1.1 when the striker's ball has made a roquet under Law 17 in the previous stroke; or

18.1.2 when the striker's ball is otherwise lawfully in contact with a live ball; or

18.1.3 as the first stroke of a turn if the ball the striker plays as the striker's ball for the turn:

18.1.3.1 is lawfully in contact with another ball at the start of the turn; or

18.1.3.2 may be and is finally placed in contact with another ball before the first stroke as a result of the striker being required to play the ball into the game in one of the first four turns under Law 11 (start of game), or being entitled to and taking a lift under Law 16 (wiring lift) or Law 39 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) or Law 40 (optional lift or contact or free placement in super-advanced play).

18.2 CHOICE OF THE BALL FROM WHICH CROQUET IS TAKEN

18.2.1 When the striker is required to take croquet in accordance with Law 18.1.1, the striker must take croquet from the ball roqueted.

18.2.2 When the striker is required to take croquet during a turn or at the start of a turn in accordance with Laws 18.1.2 or 18.1.3 respectively and the striker's ball is lawfully in contact with a live ball but is not part of a group of balls, the striker must take croquet from that live ball.

18.2.3 Except in the circumstances covered by Laws 18.2.1 (roquet), 11.2.2.1 (playing a ball into the game), 16.1.2 (wiring lift), 39.3.2 (advanced play lift) and 40.3.2 (super-advanced play lift), when the striker is required to take croquet and the striker's ball forms part of a group of balls, or would do so when placed, the striker may take croquet from any live ball in the group. The croqueted ball is chosen by playing the croquet stroke; moving balls in preparation for the croquet stroke does not determine the choice.

18.2.4 In all cases, failure to take croquet is an error covered by the applicable one of Laws 28.4, 28.5 and 28.6.

18.3 PLACING BALLS FOR THE CROQUET STROKE The striker prepares for a croquet stroke by placing the striker's ball on the ground in any position in contact with the ball from which croquet will be taken where it is not also in contact with any other ball. Except when the striker has a cannon (see Law 18.4), no other ball may be moved.

18.4 CANNONS After any replacement of balls on the yard-line that may be required under Law 15, if the ball from which croquet will be taken and the striker's ball form part of a group of balls, or would do so when the striker's ball is placed in accordance with Law 18.3, the croquet stroke is a cannon. In preparation for the cannon, all balls in the group other than the ball from which croquet will be taken become balls in hand and may be temporarily removed. The ball from which croquet will be taken must be replaced in its original position if it has been moved and the other balls are then placed as follows.

18.4.1 3-BALL CANNON The striker's ball and the third ball must each be placed in any position on the ground in contact with the ball from which croquet will be taken, provided they are not in contact with each other.

18.4.2 4-BALL CANNON The striker's ball and one of the remaining balls must be placed as in Law 18.4.1. The fourth ball must be placed on the ground in any position where it is not in contact with the striker's ball but is in contact with one or both of the other two balls.

18.4.3 The positions in which any of the balls in a cannon, other than the ball from which croquet will be taken, may be placed include positions within the yard-line area.

18.5 HOW CROQUET STROKE IS PLAYED The striker plays a stroke with the balls placed in accordance with Laws 18.3 or 18.4 and in so doing must play into the croqueted ball and move or shake it (see Law 29.1.13).

18.6 LIVE AND DEAD STATUS OF THE BALLS When a croquet stroke is played, the ball from which croquet is taken immediately becomes dead. If the croquet stroke is a cannon, the live / dead status of any other ball in the group of balls is unaffected.

18.7 BALL OFF COURT ENDING TURN In a croquet stroke the striker's turn ends if:

18.7.1 the croqueted ball is sent off the court, unless it is pegged out in the stroke; or

18.7.2 the striker's ball is sent off the court, unless it makes a roquet or scores a hoop point for itself in the stroke.

18.8 CONSEQUENCES OF A CROQUET STROKE Following a croquet stroke, the striker is entitled to play a continuation stroke unless a turn-ending event has occurred (see Law 7.6) or the striker is required to take croquet immediately (see Law 19.2).

19 CONTINUATION STROKE

19.1 ENTITLEMENT After the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself, or after a croquet stroke, the striker becomes entitled to play a continuation stroke unless the striker is required to take croquet immediately in accordance with Law 19.2 or the turn has ended.

19.2 REQUIREMENT TO TAKE CROQUET IMMEDIATELY If the striker's ball:

19.2.1 scores a hoop point for itself and makes a roquet in the same stroke; or

19.2.2 makes a roquet in a croquet stroke; or

19.2.3 is lawfully in contact with a live ball before what would otherwise be a continuation stroke and is therefore required to take croquet under Law 18.1.2

then there is no continuation stroke and, unless the striker's turn has ended, the next stroke must be a croquet stroke.

19.3 NON-CUMULATIVE Continuation strokes may not be accumulated. Accordingly, if the striker's ball scores:

19.3.1 two hoop points for itself in the same stroke; or

19.3.2 a hoop point for itself in a croquet stroke,

then, unless the turn has ended, the striker is entitled to play only one continuation stroke.

20 HOOP POINT

Running a Hoop

20.1 BALL STARTING TO RUN ITS HOOP Subject to the special situations covered in Law 20.4.2 a ball starts to run its hoop in order when it first protrudes out of the jaws of the hoop on the non-playing side when travelling from the playing side to the non-playing side. If the ball subsequently moves back through the hoop during the stroke, however, and either:

20.1.1 comes to rest in the jaws where it does not protrude out of the jaws on the non-playing side; or

20.1.2 exits the hoop entirely on the playing side

then it has not started to run the hoop.

20.2 BALL COMPLETING THE RUNNING OF ITS HOOP

20.2.1 Subject to Law 20.2.2, a ball completes running its hoop in order when it ceases to protrude out of the jaws of the hoop on the playing side while travelling forward through the hoop. If the ball subsequently moves back through the hoop during the stroke, however, and either:

20.2.1.1 comes to rest in the jaws where it protrudes out of the jaws on the playing side; or

20.2.1.2 exits the hoop entirely on the playing side

then it has not completed the running of the hoop.

20.2.2 A ball may complete running its hoop in order in the stroke in which it started to run the hoop. Alternatively, it may complete running the hoop in a subsequent stroke or turn unless it either:

20.2.2.1 becomes a ball in hand in preparation for a croquet stroke that the striker finally plays, even if it is not moved; or

20.2.2.2 is lifted under Law 16 (wiring lift) or Law 39 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) or Law 40 (optional lift, contact or free placement in super-advanced play).

In each of these cases it must start to run the hoop again.

20.3 SCORING A HOOP POINT Subject to Law 21.3 (roquet made and hoop not scored), a ball scores a hoop point in a stroke during which it completes running its hoop in order when it:

20.3.1 comes to rest in a position where it does not protrude out of the jaws of the hoop on the playing side; or

20.3.2 leaves the court; or

20.3.3 enters the jaws of the next hoop in the order specified in Law 2.4.

20.4 SPECIAL SITUATIONS

20.4.1 A ball which first enters its hoop in order from the non-playing side cannot score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke. Having so entered, it must come to rest in a position entirely clear of the hoop on the playing side, or in the jaws where it does not protrude out of the jaws on the non-playing side, before it can score the hoop point in a subsequent stroke.

20.4.2 If a ball in hand is placed for a croquet stroke within the jaws of its hoop in order where it protrudes out of the jaws on the non-playing side, and the stroke is played from that position:

20.4.2.1 it has not started to run the hoop; and

20.4.2.2 it may not do so until it is on the playing side of the hoop and does not protrude out of the jaws on the non-playing side at the start of a subsequent stroke.

20.4.3 A ball at rest cannot score or lose a hoop point solely as a result of a hoop being moved or adjusted.

20.5 CONSULTING A REFEREE OR THE OPPONENT The striker must consult in accordance with Law 55.3 before testing whether a ball has scored a hoop point or is in a position to do so.

20.6 ADJUDICATING CLOSE POSITIONS

20.6.1 If a determination of whether a ball at rest has completed running its hoop in accordance with Law 20.2 concludes that within the limits of observation it is on the borderline between protruding out of the jaws of the hoop on the playing side and not doing so, the decision shall be that it has completed the running.

20.6.2 If a determination of whether a ball at rest, or a ball placed within the jaws of its hoop in order, is in a position to run the hoop to score the hoop point concludes that within the limits of observation the ball is on the borderline between protruding out of the jaws of the hoop on the non-playing side and not doing so, the decision shall be that the ball can run the hoop to score the hoop point from that position.

20.7 CONSEQUENCES OF SCORING A HOOP POINT When the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself, the striker becomes entitled to play a continuation stroke (see Law 19.1) unless a turn-ending event (see Law 7.6) has otherwise occurred or the striker is required to take croquet immediately (see Law 19.2).

21 STRIKER'S BALL RUNNING ITS HOOP AND HITTING ANOTHER BALL

21.1 SITUATIONS COVERED This law applies in all situations where the striker's ball runs its hoop in order and hits another ball during a single stroke. Depending on the positions of the balls involved, running the hoop in order may or may not score the hoop point and hitting the other ball may or may not count as a roquet.

21.2 HOOP SCORED AND ROQUET MADE During a stroke, if the striker's ball both scores its hoop in order (see Law 20.3) and hits a ball ("the relevant ball") that was clear of the jaws of the hoop on the non-playing side at the start of the stroke:

21.2.1 the relevant ball becomes live before the impact; and so,

21.2.2 subject to the limitations on when a live ball may be roqueted defined in Laws 17.2.1 and 17.2.2, a roquet is also made on the relevant ball.

This applies no matter whether the relevant ball was live or dead before the stroke and regardless of whether the impact occurred before or after the striker's ball completed running the hoop.

21.3 ROQUET MADE AND HOOP NOT SCORED

21.3.1 A ball which makes a roquet under Law 17.1 before it starts to run its hoop in order cannot thereafter score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke.

21.3.2 During a stroke in which the striker's ball runs its hoop in order, if the striker's ball hits another ball before or after completing the running, and at the start of the stroke that other ball was:

21.3.2.1 live and not clear of the jaws of the hoop on the non-playing side; and

21.3.2.2 not in contact with the striker's ball

a roquet is made on that other ball under Law 17.1. The hoop point is not scored in that stroke regardless of where the striker's ball comes to rest.

21.4 HOOP SCORED AND ROQUET NOT MADE If the striker's ball hits another ball, before or after completing the running of its hoop in order, and at the start of the stroke that other ball was:

21.4.1 dead and not clear of the jaws of the hoop on the non-playing side; or

21.4.2 in contact with the striker's ball

then the hoop point is scored provided Law 20.3 is satisfied. A roquet is not made on the other ball, but if the balls come to rest in contact, the striker is required to take croquet in the next stroke in accordance with Law 18.1.2.

21.5 ADJUDICATING CLOSE POSITIONS When the striker's ball is about to run its hoop in order and there is another ball close to the jaws of the hoop on the non-playing side, if a determination of the position of that ball concludes that within the limits of observation the ball is on the borderline between being in or out of the jaws of the hoop, the decision shall be that it is within the jaws. In these circumstances:

21.5.1 Law 21.2 does not apply to the stroke about to be played; and

21.5.2 if the other ball is live, Law 21.3 applies if there is any contact between the balls; and

21.5.3 if the other ball is dead and the striker's ball runs the hoop, Law 21.4 applies.

22 PEG POINT

22.1 HOW A PEG POINT IS SCORED Subject to the special situations covered in Law 22.2, if the striker's ball is a rover ball:

22.1.1 it scores a peg point for itself, and is then said to be pegged out, by hitting the peg as a consequence of a stroke (but see Law 43, which limits when a ball may be pegged out in handicap play); and

22.1.2 it may cause another rover ball to be pegged out by causing it to hit the peg as a consequence of a stroke.

22.2 SPECIAL SITUATIONS

22.2.1 After the striker's ball makes a roquet under Law 17.1, it cannot score a peg point for itself in the same stroke.

22.2.2 If the striker's ball simultaneously hits a live ball and the peg in order, it is pegged out unless the striker claims a roquet by taking croquet.

22.2.3 At the start of a turn, if the striker plays a rover ball that is in contact with the peg, that ball is pegged out unless it is hit in a direction away from the peg.

22.2.4 If the striker's ball is a rover ball and hits, or causes another ball to hit, another rover ball that is in contact with the peg, that other rover ball is pegged out unless it is hit in a direction away from the peg.

22.2.5 If the striker's ball, being a rover ball, and another rover ball that it causes to hit the peg do so simultaneously, the striker is entitled to nominate the order in which they are pegged out.

22.2.6 If the striker apparently scores a peg point for any ball while playing a wrong ball, Law 27.4 applies.

22.2.7 A ball at rest cannot be pegged out solely as a result of the peg being moved or straightened.

22.3 BALL REMAINING IN PLAY

22.3.1 A ball remains in play throughout the stroke in which it is pegged out but it becomes dead upon hitting the peg and may not thereafter be roqueted. During the stroke, it may cause other balls to move, be roqueted, and score hoop or peg points and may cause the striker's ball to make a roquet.

22.3.2 A pegged out ball may be moved, picked up or arrested in its course, but only if the state of the game will not be affected thereby.

22.4 REMOVAL FROM COURT A ball ceases to be a ball in play and becomes an outside agency at the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out. The striker must remove a pegged out ball and the corresponding clip from the court before the next stroke, although these removals may be delayed until after the next stroke if the pegged out ball is unlikely to interfere with that stroke. If the pegged out ball does interfere or if it and its clip are not then removed, Law 31 applies.

B IRREGULARITIES IN PLAY

23 FORESTALLING PLAY

23.1 HOW TO FORESTALL A player forestalls play by requesting the striker to cease play in a manner that could reasonably be expected to convey the request. If the striker continues to play after being forestalled and before the issue is settled, Law 26 applies.

23.2 WHEN A PLAYER MUST CEASE OR FORESTALL PLAY The striker must cease play and, subject to the exceptions specified in Law 23.3 and the restrictions on timing specified in Law 23.4, the opponent must forestall play immediately the player suspects or becomes aware that:

23.2.1 the striker intends to play a questionable stroke without having it specially watched; or

23.2.2 an error, other than a fault, or an interference is about to occur; or

23.2.3 an error or an interference has occurred; or

23.2.4 the striker's turn is about to end prematurely as specified in Law 38.1 or, in handicap play, Law 42.5; or

23.2.5 a clip is misplaced; or

23.2.6 a boundary marking has been displaced.

23.3 WHEN OPPONENT MUST NOT FORESTALL Unless a turn-ending error under Laws 26, 27, 28.4 or 29 has already occurred, the opponent must not forestall play or warn the striker if the opponent suspects or becomes aware that the striker is about to:

23.3.1 run a wrong hoop; or

23.3.2 play a wrong ball; or

23.3.3 play a croquet stroke involving a dead ball.

23.4 DISTRACTING THE STRIKER The opponent must not forestall play after a stroke has started and before it has been played unless the playing of the stroke would take the issue to be raised past its limit of claims or there is other urgent reason related to the stroke. Forestalling in breach of this restriction constitutes interference with the playing of a stroke and Law 35.1 applies.

24 MULTIPLE ERRORS AND INTERFERENCES

24.1 APPLICABILITY Law 24 applies when it is discovered that more than one error and/or interference, which have not previously been considered, have occurred, regardless of whether they occurred in the same or in different strokes. Treatment of individual errors and interferences is covered by Laws 25 and 30 respectively.

24.2 WHEN AN ERROR OR INTERFERENCE OCCURS

24.2.1 An error under Laws 26 to 28 and Law 48.4 occurs when a stroke that breaches those laws is played.

24.2.2 A fault under Law 29 occurs when it is committed.

24.2.3 An interference under Laws 31 and 32 occurs at the time specified in Laws 31.2 and 32.2 respectively.

24.2.4 An interference under Laws 33 and 35 occurs when a stroke affected by the interference is played.

24.2.5 Other interferences occur when play is affected by them.

24.3 PRECEDENCE The errors or interferences are considered in the order in which they occurred, starting with the earliest, except as follows.

24.3.1 Subject to Law 24.4, any error or interference for which the limit of claims has passed at the time of discovery is ignored.

24.3.2 If more than one error or interference occurred when a stroke was played, any interferences are considered first, in the order of the applicable Laws 31 to 38, followed by any errors in order of the applicable Laws 26 to 29.

24.3.3 If an interference under Law 38.2 is followed by a fault under Law 29 in the same stroke, and it is agreed by the players or adjudicated by a referee that the fault was not caused by the interference, the fault is dealt with first.

24.3.4 If play is cancelled or a stroke is replayed to remedy an error or an interference, any remaining errors or interferences are ignored.

24.3.5 If incorrect equipment has materially affected a stroke, as specified in Law 38.2, the equipment must be corrected before its width might next affect play.

24.4 EARLIER ERRORS DISCOVERED WHEN AN INTERFERENCE IS BEING REDRESSED If it is discovered during the redressing of an interference under Laws 31 to 33 that one or more errors had occurred before play was affected by the interference and the limits of claims of those errors had not then passed, the laws applicable to those errors must be applied as if the error or errors had been discovered at that time.

C ERRORS IN PLAY

25 GENERAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING ERRORS

25.1 DELIBERATE ERRORS A player must not deliberately commit an error.

25.2 DECLARING AN ERROR Any error the striker commits or suspects may have been committed must immediately be declared and play must cease until the matter is resolved.

25.3 RECTIFICATION

25.3.1 An error is rectified by cancelling all points scored for any ball in any stroke in error and placing the balls in their lawful positions at the start of the first stroke in error. If a ball could have occupied more than one lawful position at that time, it may be placed in any such position at the choice of the player who committed the error. If a ball is replaced following rectification of a fault, however, it must be replaced in the position it occupied before the first stroke in error was played.

25.3.2 If the striker's turn continues after rectification, each ball is then live only if it was live at the start of the first stroke in error.

25.4 LIMIT OF CLAIMS If the end of a turn prevents the limit of claims of an error being reached, the limit becomes when the first stroke of the next turn is played, or when the game ends if the error occurs in the last turn of the game. Strokes in error are counted when determining whether the limit of claims of any other error has passed.

25.5 DISCOVERY AFTER LIMIT OF CLAIMS

25.5.1 If an error is discovered after its limit of claims it is not rectified, except in accordance with Law 25.5.2. The balls are not replaced and all points in order scored for any ball in any stroke in error are counted.

25.5.2 If the striker apparently scores a peg point while playing a wrong ball or scores any point for the partner's ball while playing it in ordinary doubles, Laws 27.4 and 45.4 apply respectively and the error must be remedied in accordance with those laws if it is discovered before the end of the game.

26 PLAYING WHEN NOT ENTITLED

26.1 APPLICABILITY This law covers situations where:

26.1.1 a player continues to play after one of the turn-ending events in Law 7.6 has occurred; or

26.1.2 one side plays one or more strokes while the other side's turn is still lawfully in progress; or

26.1.3 a player continues to play after having been forestalled and before the issue is settled; or

26.1.4 the striker plays a stroke before the preceding one has ended and the outcome of either stroke is affected.

26.2 REMEDY If a player plays one or more strokes when not entitled to do so and the error is discovered before the limit of claims:

26.2.1 any points scored in the first stroke in error and any subsequent strokes played by the offending side are cancelled; and

26.2.2 any balls moved by those strokes are replaced, unless they have subsequently been moved by strokes that the non-offending side was entitled to play; and

26.2.3 if the player continued to play after having been forestalled, any outstanding issues must be settled; and

26.2.4 the side entitled to play then plays.

26.3 LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is when the first stroke is played in the next turn to be started by the non-offending side.

27 PLAYING A WRONG BALL

27.1 APPLICABILITY

27.1.1 This law covers situations where the striker plays a stroke with a ball that:

27.1.1.1 is not the ball in play validly chosen as the striker's ball for the turn by playing it in the first stroke of the turn in accordance with Law 12.2.1 or lifting it as specified in Law 12.2.2; or

27.1.1.2 belongs to the other side; or

27.1.1.3 is the partner's ball in ordinary doubles (see Law 45.1); or

27.1.1.4 in the third or fourth turn of the game cannot be the striker's ball for the turn because its partner ball must be played into the game in accordance with Law 11.2.2; or

27.1.1.5 is not the striker's ball of the previous turn when playing a half-bisque or bisque in handicap play (see Law 42.1).

27.1.2 This law does not cover situations where the striker plays a ball from another game or a ball of the game that has been pegged out and removed from the court or a ball of the game that has not yet become a ball in play, which are outside agencies. Playing such a ball is treated as an interference under Law 33.

27.2 REMEDY

27.2.1 Except in situations at the start of a game covered by Laws 27.5 and 27.6, if the striker plays a wrong ball and the error is discovered before its limit of claims, the error is rectified and the turn ends.

27.2.2 If the error is rectified and was committed in the first stroke of one of the first four turns of the game, a correct ball must be placed on any unoccupied point on either baulk-line at the choice of the player who committed the error. That ball becomes a ball in play and the turn ends.

27.2.3 A ball wrongly played into the game becomes a ball in play but it ceases to be so if it is removed from the game by the error being rectified.

27.3 LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is when the first stroke is played in the next turn to be started by either side playing a correct ball. In handicap play the limit of claims is modified in accordance with Law 42.3.3 when a half-bisque or bisque is played.

27.4 PEG POINT NOT SCORED WHILE PLAYING WRONG BALL The striker may not score a peg point for any ball while playing a wrong ball. Any peg point apparently so scored must be cancelled if discovered at any time before the end of the game, and Law 31 applies.

27.5 PLAYER OF FOURTH TURN UNABLE TO PLAY CORRECT BALL The game must be restarted if the player of the fourth turn of the game discovers, either before or after the first stroke of the turn, that both balls of the side were played into the game in the first two turns of the game.

27.6 REVERSAL OF INITIAL CHOICE OF BALLS If the players discover at any time after the first stroke of the fifth turn of the game that they have both played a wrong ball in the first stroke of every earlier turn of the game, the choice of balls made under Law 10.2 is reversed with effect from the start of the game.

28 PLAYING WHEN A BALL IS MISPLACED

28.1 APPLICABILITY This law covers situations where the striker, being entitled to play a stroke, plays one with one or more balls misplaced from their lawful positions.

28.2 GENERAL

28.2.1 Between strokes, any misplaced ball must be placed in a lawful position. If there is more than one such position available, the player who should have placed the ball correctly may choose in which of them to place the ball. Subject to the restrictions on when to forestall specified in Law 23.3 and the circumstances covered in Law 28.2.2, if the opponent observes that the striker is about to play a stroke when any ball is misplaced, the opponent must forestall play.

28.2.2 Notwithstanding Law 28.2.1, the striker may play a stroke knowing that a ball has been moved from its lawful position to expedite a double-banked game, and the opponent is not required to forestall, provided the striker reasonably believes that the stroke will not affect that ball in either its lawful or its actual position. Such a ball is ignored when applying the remainder of these laws.

28.2.3 If one or more balls become misplaced by natural forces just before the stroke is played, Law 28.3 must be applied before applying the remainder of these laws.

28.2.4 If a stroke is played with one or more balls misplaced as specified in any of Laws 28.4 to 28.8, an error is thereby committed under only the first of those laws that applies.

28.2.5 In all other cases, the stroke is lawful unless other errors or interferences have occurred.

28.2.6 A misplaced ball remains so until it is placed in a lawful position or moved by a stroke.

28.3 MISPLACEMENT BY NATURAL FORCES JUST BEFORE STROKE PLAYED For the purposes of deciding whether a stroke has been validly played or an error committed under these laws:

28.3.1 a ball is deemed to be in contact with another ball when a stroke is played even if it is physically not in contact at that time if, in preparation for the stroke, the striker attempted finally to place, adjust or leave the balls in contact; and

28.3.2 a ball is deemed not to be in contact with another ball when a stroke is played even if it is physically in contact at that time if, in preparation for the stroke, the striker attempted finally to place, adjust or leave the balls out of contact.

28.4 UNLAWFUL CROQUET STROKE INVOLVING A DEAD BALL

28.4.1 If the striker plays a croquet stroke with the striker's ball in contact with a dead ball and the error is discovered before its limit of claims, the error is rectified and the turn ends.

28.4.2 The limit of claims is when the first stroke of the opponent's next turn is played.

28.5 UNLAWFUL CROQUET STROKE INVOLVING A LIVE BALL

28.5.1 If the striker plays a croquet stroke with the striker's ball in an unlawful position in contact with a live ball and the error is discovered before its limit of claims, the error is rectified.

28.5.2 The strokes in error must then be analysed to determine how play continues. For this purpose, the unlawful croquet stroke shall be treated as a croquet stroke in which the live ball is the croqueted ball. If any of the turn-ending events set out in Law 7.6 occurred during any of the strokes in error, the striker's turn ends. Otherwise, the striker resumes the turn.

28.5.3 The limit of claims is when the third stroke in error is played.

28.6 FAILING TO TAKE CROQUET WHEN REQUIRED TO DO SO

28.6.1 If the striker, being required to take croquet, plays a stroke which is not a croquet stroke and the error is discovered before its limit of claims, the error is rectified.

28.6.2 The strokes in error must then be analysed to determine how play continues. For this purpose, the first stroke in error shall be treated as though the striker was entitled to and did play a stroke that was not a croquet stroke. If any of the turn-ending events set out in Law 7.6 occurred during any of the strokes in error, the striker's turn ends. Otherwise, the striker resumes the turn.

28.6.3 The limit of claims is when the third stroke in error is played.

28.7 FAILING TO PLAY A BALL FROM BAULK

28.7.1 If the striker, being required to play a ball from a baulk-line in accordance with Law 11 (start of game) or Law 16 (wiring lift) or Law 39.3 (optional lift in advanced play) or Law 40.3 (optional lift in super-advanced play), plays a stroke from a position materially other than a point on a baulk-line and the error is discovered before its limit of claims, the error is rectified.

28.7.2 The strokes in error must then be analysed to determine how play continues. If any of the turn-ending events set out in Law 7.6 occurred during any of the strokes in error, the striker's turn ends. Otherwise, the striker restarts the turn with the same ball and may choose the position on the baulk-lines from which to play the first stroke.

28.7.3 The limit of claims is when the third stroke of the striker's turn is played.

28.8 LIFTING A BALL WHEN NOT ENTITLED TO DO SO

28.8.1 If the striker, having lifted either ball of the striker's side at the start of a turn when not entitled to do so, plays a stroke with it misplaced and the error is discovered before its limit of claims, the error is rectified.

28.8.2 The strokes in error must then be analysed to determine how play continues. If any of the turn-ending events set out in Law 7.6 occurred during any of the strokes in error, the striker's turn ends. Otherwise, the striker restarts the turn with either ball of the side.

28.8.3 The limit of claims is when the third stroke of the striker's turn is played.

29 FAULTS

29.1 ACTIONS THAT CONSTITUTE FAULTS Subject to the exemptions and limitations specified in Law 29.2 a fault is committed during the striking period if the striker:

29.1.1 touches the head of the mallet with a hand, or slides the mallet along the striker's foot or leg to guide it (for exemptions see Laws 29.2.1 and 29.2.2);

29.1.2 rests the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm on the ground, an outside agency, or any part of the striker's legs or feet (for exemptions see Law 29.2.2);

29.1.3 moves the striker's ball other than by striking it with the mallet audibly and distinctly;

29.1.4 causes or attempts to cause the mallet to strike the striker's ball by kicking, hitting, dropping or throwing the mallet;

29.1.5 strikes the striker's ball with any part of the mallet other than an end-face of the head in any of the strokes specified in Law 29.2.3;

29.1.6 allows the mallet:

29.1.6.1 to contact the striker's ball more than once in a croquet stroke, or continuation stroke when the striker's ball is touching another ball (for exemptions see Law 29.2.4 and for limitations see Law 29.2.5); or

29.1.6.2 to contact the striker's ball more than once in any other stroke (for exemptions see Law 29.2.4); or

29.1.6.3 to remain in contact with the striker's ball for an observable period in any stroke (for exemptions see Law 29.2.4 and for limitations see Law 29.2.6);

29.1.7 allows the mallet to be in contact with the striker's ball after the striker's ball has hit another ball (for exemptions see Law 29.2.4 and for limitations see Law 29.2.7);

29.1.8 strikes the striker's ball so as to cause it to touch a hoop upright or, unless the striker's ball is pegged out in the stroke, the peg when in contact with the mallet;

29.1.9 strikes the striker's ball when it lies in contact with a hoop upright or, unless the striker's ball is pegged out in the stroke, the peg otherwise than in a direction away therefrom;

29.1.10 moves or shakes a ball at rest by hitting a hoop or the peg with the mallet or with any part of the body;

29.1.11 touches any ball, other than the striker's ball, with the mallet;

29.1.12 touches any ball with any part of the body;

29.1.13 in a croquet stroke, plays away from or fails to move or shake the croqueted ball;

29.1.14 in any of the strokes specified in Law 29.2.3, damages the court with the mallet to the extent that a subsequent stroke played over the damaged area could be significantly affected.

29.2 EXEMPTIONS AND LIMITATIONS

29.2.1 The fault of touching the head of the mallet in Law 29.1.1 is committed only if the striker touches the mallet head during the final swing of the mallet towards the ball.

29.2.2 A fault is not committed under Laws 29.1.1 or 29.1.2 if the touching, resting or sliding occurs after the striker has completed the swing in which the stroke was played.

29.2.3 The actions specified in Laws 29.1.5 and 29.1.14 are faults only if they occur in:

29.2.3.1 a hampered stroke; or

29.2.3.2 a single-ball stroke in which the striker is attempting to make the striker's ball jump; or

29.2.3.3 a stroke in which the striker's ball is part of a group of balls.

29.2.4 Contact between the mallet and the striker's ball is not a fault under Laws 29.1.6 or 29.1.7 if it occurs after the striker's ball:

29.2.4.1 makes a roquet; or

29.2.4.2 scores the peg point; or

29.2.4.3 hits a ball pegged out in the stroke.

The exemption of Law 29.2.4.1 does not apply, however, if the striker's ball has hit another object after making the roquet.

29.2.5 A multiple contact between the mallet and the striker's ball is a fault under Law 29.1.6.1 only if the striker or a referee or other person asked to adjudicate the stroke, aided by nothing more than spectacles or contact lenses, sees a separation between mallet and ball followed by a second contact between them.

29.2.6 The mallet remaining in contact with the striker's ball for an observable period is a fault under Law 29.1.6.3 if the prolonged contact is visible or audible to the striker or a referee or other person asked to adjudicate the stroke, aided by nothing more than spectacles, contact lenses or hearing aids.

29.2.7 The mallet being in contact with the striker's ball after the striker's ball has hit another ball is a fault under Law 29.1.7 if the continuation of contact is visible or audible to the striker or a referee or other person asked to adjudicate the stroke, aided by nothing more than spectacles, contact lenses or hearing aids, or if it can be deduced from observation of the trajectories and speeds of the balls involved compared to what would occur in a lawful stroke of the same type.

29.3 REMEDY

29.3.1 If the striker commits a fault and the error is discovered before its limit of claims, any points scored in the first or second stroke in error are cancelled and the turn ends.

29.3.2 The striker must ask the opponent whether the fault is to be rectified. If the opponent chooses rectification, the balls are replaced in accordance with Law 25.3.1. Otherwise the balls remain or are replaced in the positions they occupied after the first stroke in error. Law 42.8 defines when the opponent must take this decision in relation to when the striker is required to decide about playing a half-bisque or bisque in handicap play.

29.4 LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is when the third stroke in error is played.

29.5 ACTIONS OF THE STRIKER'S PARTNER THAT CONSTITUTE FAULTS IN DOUBLES In doubles play, certain actions by the striker's partner during the striking period are faults. These are specified in Laws 45.3.2 and 48.3.2.

29.6 STANDARD OF JUDGEMENT APPLYING TO THE DECLARATION OF A FAULT A fault under Law 29.1 is to be declared if a person who has been asked to adjudicate the stroke under Law 55.4.1, or the striker, believes it more likely than not that the law was infringed.

D INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY

30 GENERAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING INTERFERENCES

30.1 DELIBERATE INTERFERENCE A player must not deliberately commit an interference.

30.2 PLAYER MUST DECLARE A player must immediately forestall play in respect of, or declare, any interference the player believes may have affected play or will affect the stroke about to be played.

30.3 REMEDY FOR AN INTERFERENCE

30.3.1 An interference under Laws 31 to 33 is redressed by returning the game to the point where the interference first affected play and cancelling all subsequent play. This involves:

30.3.1.1 returning the balls to the positions they lawfully occupied at that time; and

30.3.1.2 cancelling any points scored during the period of cancelled play; and

30.3.1.3 restoring the time that has elapsed since the interference first affected play; and

30.3.1.4 in handicap play restoring any bisques taken after the interference first affected play; and

30.3.1.5 returning responsibility for the position of each ball to what it was at the time the interference first affected play.

30.3.2 If an interference is not subject to a restriction on how the player then entitled to play must resume play, the player may adopt any line of play. In addition, if the first affected stroke was the first stroke of a turn, the player may play either ball of the side that could lawfully have been played in the first stroke of the turn and may decide whether and how to take any lift, contact or free placement to which the player was then entitled under Laws 16, 39 or 40.

30.3.3 Responsibility for the position of any ball replaced when remedying an interference under Laws 34 to 38 returns to what it was immediately before the ball was affected by the interference.

31 BALL WRONGLY REMOVED OR NOT REMOVED FROM THE GAME

31.1 NATURE OF THE INTERFERENCE This interference occurs if it is discovered before the limit of claims that play has been affected because either:

31.1.1 a ball has been removed from the game under the misapprehension that it has been pegged out; or

31.1.2 a ball has not been removed from the game in accordance with Law 22.4 when it has been pegged out.

31.2 WHEN PLAY IS AFFECTED Play is considered to have been affected from the time when:

31.2.1 a stroke is played which moves a ball that has been wrongly left on the court; or

31.2.2 either player is misled in any turn into adopting a line of play that the player would not otherwise have followed in that turn; or

31.2.3 the ball was first misplaced if it cannot otherwise be determined when play was first affected.

31.3 REMEDY The interference must be redressed in accordance with Law 30.3.1. Subject to Law 24.4, the player then entitled to play resumes play and may adopt any line of play.

31.4 LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is the end of the game.

32 PLAYER MISLED BY FALSE INFORMATION OR MISPLACED BALL OR CLIP

32.1 NATURE OF THE INTERFERENCE This interference occurs if it is discovered before the limit of claims that play has been affected because a player was misled by:

32.1.1 false information concerning the state of the game supplied by the opponent, a referee, or a person authorised by the players to act as timekeeper; or

32.1.2 the misplacement of a ball that has suffered interference, other than by the player, or has been moved to avoid interference; or

32.1.3 the misplacement of a clip for which the player was not originally responsible.

32.2 WHEN PLAY IS AFFECTED Play is considered to have been affected from the time when the player would first have adopted a different line of play had the correct situation been known.

32.3 REMEDY If a player successfully claims to have been misled, the interference is redressed in accordance with Law 30.3.1. Subject to Law 24.4, the player is entitled to a replay from the point where play was first affected and, in that replay, must adopt a different line of play.

32.4 LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is the end of the game.

32.5 FAILURE TO ADOPT A DIFFERENT LINE OF PLAY IN A REPLAY

32.5.1 If it is discovered before the limit of claims that the player did not adopt a different line of play in a replay, the player ceases to be entitled to the replay and the state of the game reverts to the point at which the claim for the replay was made. Subject to Law 32.5.2, the player then entitled to play shall play.

32.5.2 Should any earlier errors have been discovered during the now-annulled remedying of the claimed interference, those errors shall be treated as though they had been discovered at the time the claim to have been misled was made and Law 24.4 shall be applied accordingly.

32.5.3 The limit of claims is when the third stroke of the replay is played.

32.6 DUTY OF PLAYERS Both players have a duty to ensure that the clips are correctly placed and, subject to the restrictions on timing of forestalling specified in Laws 23.3 and 23.4, must call attention immediately to any misplaced clip.

33 USING A BALL THAT IS AN OUTSIDE AGENCY

33.1 NATURE OF THE INTERFERENCE

33.1.1 This interference occurs if it is discovered before the limit of claims that the striker has struck, or otherwise included in the game subject to the exclusions in Law 33.1.2, a ball that is an outside agency because it is:

33.1.1.1 a ball not belonging to the game; or

33.1.1.2 a ball of the game that has not yet become a ball in play; or

33.1.1.3 a ball of the game that has been pegged out and removed from the court.

33.1.2 Law 33.1.1 does not apply to any attempt to roquet a ball from a game that is double-banked on the court, nor to any croquet stroke played with the objective of roqueting a ball from that double-banked game in the next stroke.

33.2 INADVERTENT BALL SWAP Play is not affected by a ball of the game being inadvertently swapped with another ball of the same colour and type when both are off the court. If such a ball swap is discovered before the limit of claims, it must be reversed, with the correct ball of the game taking the position then occupied by the outside agency.

33.3 WHEN PLAY IS AFFECTED Otherwise, play is considered to have been affected from the first stroke to have involved the ball that is an outside agency or to have been influenced by its presence in the game.

33.4 REMEDY When play has been affected, the interference must be redressed in accordance with Law 30.3.1. Subject to Law 24.4 (the discovery of earlier errors), the player entitled to play once the interference has been redressed resumes play without penalty and may adopt any line of play.

33.5 LIMIT OF CLAIMS The limit of claims is the end of the game.

34 OUTSIDE AGENCY OR A PLAYER INTERFERING WITH A BALL DURING A STROKE

34.1 NATURE OF THE INTERFERENCE This interference occurs if an outside agency or a player, other than the striker during the striking period, touches a ball during a stroke. Play is affected when the ball is touched.

34.2 REMEDY

34.2.1 Subject to Law 34.4 (interference with a ball during a croquet stroke), the striker must replay the same stroke with the same objectives, after replacing the balls in their lawful positions before the stroke was played, if:

34.2.1.1 no further stroke has been played; and

34.2.1.2 the interference might have prevented a point being scored, a roquet being made, or a ball coming to rest in a critical position; and

34.2.1.3 the interference was caused by an outside agency that was not in the position it was in at the start of the stroke or by the opponent.

34.2.2 Otherwise, there is no replay and all balls must be placed as near as possible to where they would have been at the end of the stroke had the interference not occurred. After interference to a ball under Law 34.1, the ball may not score a point, make a roquet, nor be roqueted during that stroke.

34.3 FAILURE TO ATTEMPT THE SAME STROKE IN A REPLAY If the striker, being required to replay the stroke, does not attempt the same stroke in the replay, the opponent shall have the choice of accepting the replay's outcome or requiring a further replay of the original stroke.

34.4 INTERFERENCE WITH A BALL DURING A CROQUET STROKE In a croquet stroke, the turn ends under Law 18.7 if either ball would have gone off the court had interference under Law 34.1 not occurred. A replay under Law 34.2.1 is then not permitted. The turn does not end merely because a ball went off the court as a result of interference under Law 34.1.

34.5 FAILURE TO CORRECT THE POSITION OF A BALL AFTER INTERFERENCE If a ball is not correctly placed or replaced before the next stroke, it becomes misplaced and Law 28.1 applies.

34.6 AVOIDING INTERFERENCE BY AN OUTSIDE AGENCY OR BY LOOSE IMPEDIMENTS

34.6.1 AVOIDING INTERFERENCE BY AN OUTSIDE AGENCY A movable outside agency should be moved or removed if it might affect play.

34.6.2 DEALING WITH LOOSE IMPEDIMENTS Loose impediments may be removed by the striker at any time and must be removed if they are likely to benefit the striker in the stroke about to be played. Only in exceptional circumstances to be dealt with under the overriding law (Law 63) may loose impediments be treated as outside agencies.

35 OUTSIDE AGENCY OR OPPONENT INTERFERING WITH THE PLAYING OF A STROKE

35.1 NATURE OF THE INTERFERENCE This interference occurs if the outcome of a stroke is materially affected because:

35.1.1 the striker, the court or the equipment, other than balls, was touched by an outside agency or the opponent; or

35.1.2 the opponent forestalled play in breach of Law 23.4.

In all cases the interference occurs when the affected stroke is played.

35.2 REMEDY If the interference is discovered before the next stroke, the striker must replay the same stroke with the same objectives after replacing the balls in their lawful positions before the stroke was played. Exceptional cases may be dealt with under the overriding law (Law 63).

35.3 FAILURE TO ATTEMPT THE SAME STROKE IN A REPLAY If the striker, being required to replay the stroke, does not attempt the same stroke in the replay, the opponent shall have the choice of accepting the replay's outcome or requiring a further replay of the original stroke.

36 INTERFERENCE WITH A BALL BETWEEN STROKES

36.1 NATURE OF THE INTERFERENCE This interference occurs between strokes when a ball moves as a consequence of natural forces or is moved by a player or an outside agency.

36.2 REMEDY

36.2.1 NATURAL FORCES OR AGENCY OTHER THAN THE STRIKER Between strokes, if a ball moves or is moved into an unlawful position by natural forces or an outside agency or a player other than the striker it must be replaced in the position it lawfully occupied as agreed between the players or adjudicated by a referee.

36.2.2 THE STRIKER INTERFERING WITH THE STRIKER'S BALL If the striker interferes:

36.2.2.1 between strokes with the ball at rest already chosen as the striker's ball; or

36.2.2.2 before the first stroke of the turn with a ball at rest that is subsequently chosen to be the striker's ball for the turn

by touching it with the mallet or the striker's body except when repositioning it in accordance with these laws, the ball must be replaced as specified in Law 36.2.1. Subject to the exemptions specified in Law 36.3, when the next stroke is a single-ball stroke the striker may not play any critical stroke in that stroke but may otherwise continue the turn.

36.2.3 THE STRIKER INTERFERING WITH ANOTHER BALL If the striker interferes:

36.2.3.1 between strokes with a ball at rest that is not the striker's ball; or

36.2.3.2 before the first stroke of the turn with a ball at rest that is not subsequently chosen to be the striker's ball for the turn

by touching it with the mallet or the striker's body except when repositioning it in accordance with these laws, the ball must be replaced as specified in Law 36.2.1. Subject to the exemptions specified in Law 36.3, when the next stroke is a single-ball stroke the striker may not involve that ball in it if the stroke would then be a critical stroke but may otherwise continue the turn.

36.3 EXEMPTIONS The restrictions on play specified in Laws 36.2.2 and 36.2.3 do not apply to any ball that:

36.3.1 had already been marked by a referee or to the joint satisfaction of the players before the interference; or

36.3.2 the striker is entitled to lift or move under Law 5.3.2 (temporary removal) provided that the ball's original position had been marked before it was interfered with if it would be required to be lawfully replaced in that position; or

36.3.3 is moved in an emergency to avoid it being hit or moved by an outside agency.

36.4 DETERMINING WHETHER A STROKE IS A CRITICAL STROKE Following interference under Laws 36.2.2 or 36.2.3, whether the next stroke the striker intends to play is a critical stroke is a matter to be agreed between the players or, failing that, decided by a referee. If either the players or the referee consider the situation to be borderline, the stroke shall be considered to be a critical stroke.

36.5 STRIKER ATTEMPTING A CRITICAL STROKE FOLLOWING INTERFERENCE

36.5.1 If the opponent considers that the striker is about to play a critical stroke in breach of Laws 36.2.2 or 36.2.3, the opponent must forestall play and request a referee to adjudicate.

36.5.2 If the striker plays a critical stroke that is not permitted under this law, the overriding law (Law 63) may apply.

37 INTERFERENCE BY NATURAL FORCES OR FEATURES OF THE COURT AND ITS SURROUNDINGS

37.1 NATURAL FORCES If a ball is affected by natural forces, for example wind or gravity, during a stroke, it must be replaced if it was not moved by the stroke. Otherwise there is no remedy.

37.2 FIXED OBSTACLES AND CHANGES OF LEVEL If any fixed obstacle or change of level outside the court is likely to interfere with the playing of the next stroke, the striker must consult in accordance with Law 55.3 and may then move the striker's ball no more than is necessary to allow a normal stance and a free swing of the mallet. Law 37.4 must then also be applied.

37.3 SPECIAL DAMAGE If special damage to the court is likely to interfere with the playing of the next stroke, the striker must consult in accordance with Law 55.3 and the players should agree to the repair of the damage, where practicable, before play continues. Should repair not be practicable, as an alternative the striker may move any ball affected by the special damage no more than is necessary to avoid the damage and never to the striker's advantage. Law 37.4 must then also be applied.

37.4 MOVING OTHER BALLS When a ball is moved under Laws 37.2 or 37.3, the striker must also move any other ball that could foreseeably be affected by the next stroke so as to maintain their relative positions. A ball in a critical position so far as the stroke about to be played is concerned, however, should be moved only to avoid inequity. Any ball so moved but not affected by subsequent play must be replaced as near as possible to its original position as soon as it is no longer relevant to the striker's line of play or, if earlier, when the striker's turn ends.

38 MISCELLANEOUS INTERFERENCE

38.1 TURN WRONGLY ENDING If the striker, wrongly believing that the turn has ended under Law 7.6, quits the court or permits the opponent to play and the mistake is discovered before the first stroke of the opponent's turn, the striker's turn is resumed. The opponent must inform the striker immediately upon becoming aware of the striker's mistake.

38.2 STROKE AFFECTED BY INCORRECT HOOP WIDTH OR MIS-SHAPEN BALL

38.2.1 If the striker of the immediately preceding stroke suspects that its outcome was materially affected by a ball being in contact with both uprights of a hoop simultaneously, the player is entitled to have the equipment checked and, if necessary, adjusted or replaced. The time taken to do this is restored.

38.2.2 If it is found that the ball does touch both uprights of the hoop simultaneously on some axis and the opponent agrees or a referee decides that:

38.2.2.1 the player had attempted to get the ball through the hoop; and

38.2.2.2 there are plausible grounds for the player's suspicion that the outcome of the stroke was materially affected,

the player may choose to replay the stroke, attempting to get the ball through the hoop again, unless the turn has ended under Law 7.6 for a reason unconnected with the faulty or mis-set equipment.

38.2.3 If the player chooses not to replay the stroke, the outcome of the original stroke stands. Should any ball have jammed in a hoop above the ground in the original stroke, it shall then be placed on the ground in the centre of the hoop.

38.2.4 If the player chooses to replay the stroke but does not attempt to get the ball through the hoop again, the opponent shall have the choice of accepting the replay's outcome or requiring a further replay of the attempt to get the ball through the hoop.

38.3 BALL STRIKING A CLIP OR THE PEG EXTENSION If a ball strikes a clip attached to a hoop or to the peg, or the peg extension when attached to the peg, it is not interference with play and there is no remedy. For a clip, this applies irrespective of whether or not the clip is part of the game. An unattached clip or peg extension is an outside agency and Law 34 applies to any interference by it.

38.4 DISPLACED BOUNDARY MARKING

38.4.1 A player who becomes aware that a boundary marking is displaced must forestall play in accordance with Law 23.2.

38.4.2 If the marking was displaced between strokes and the straightening of it would affect a test as to whether a ball has left the court in the stroke immediately before play was forestalled or would affect the playing of the next stroke, such test or stroke must be completed before the marking is straightened.

38.4.3 If the marking was displaced during a stroke, or straightening it would not affect play, it must be straightened before such test is carried out or the next stroke is played.

38.4.4 When a marking is straightened, any affected yard-line balls must be adjusted accordingly. Any other balls in the immediate vicinity must also be moved so as to maintain the relative positions of the balls.

PART 3 OTHER FORMS OF PLAY

A ADVANCED SINGLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of advanced singles play, the laws applicable to level singles play apply with the addition of Law 39.

39 OPTIONAL LIFT OR CONTACT

39.1 LIFT HOOPS The lift hoops are hoops 7 and 10 (1-back and 4-back). For shortened games Law 52 specifies the lift hoops.

39.2 WHEN ENTITLED TO A LIFT The striker is entitled to a lift when the striker's ball of the preceding turn scored one of the lift hoops for itself in that turn and the striker's entitlement to lifts and contact has not ended under Law 39.6.

39.3 HOW TO PLAY THE LIFT TURN The striker must start the turn:

39.3.1 by playing as the balls lie; or

39.3.2 by lifting either ball of the side that can lawfully be played, even if it is in contact with one or more balls, and playing it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line. If the lifted ball can contact another ball when so placed on the baulk-line, the striker may take croquet immediately from that ball under Law 18.1.3.2, but is not entitled to take croquet immediately from any other ball in a group of which the two balls may form part.

39.4 WHEN ENTITLED TO A CONTACT The striker is entitled to a contact when:

39.4.1 the striker's ball of the preceding turn scored both lift hoops for itself in that turn; and

39.4.2 its partner ball had not scored the first of the lift hoops before that turn; and

39.4.3 the striker's entitlement to lifts and contact has not ended under Law 39.6.

39.5 HOW TO PLAY THE CONTACT TURN The striker must start the turn:

39.5.1 as in Laws 39.3.1 or 39.3.2; or

39.5.2 by lifting either ball of the side that can lawfully be played, even if it is in contact with one or more balls, placing it in contact with any ball and taking croquet forthwith.

39.6 ENDING OF ENTITLEMENT TO LIFTS AND CONTACT The striker is not entitled to a lift or contact under this law after pegging out any ball during the game.

39.7 THIRD AND FOURTH TURNS OF THE GAME If the striker of the third or fourth turn of the game is entitled to a contact under Law 39.4, the striker may play the ball into the game in accordance with Law 11.2.2.2.

39.8 CHANGE OF DECISION

39.8.1 BALL NOT IN CONTACT WITH ANOTHER BALL If the striker lifts a ball of the side that is not in contact with another ball when entitled to a lift or contact, the ball lifted is thereby chosen as the striker's ball and the striker may not then play with the other ball of the side. Doing so is playing a wrong ball and Law 27 applies. The striker must take the lift or contact to which the side is entitled and may not play the lifted ball from where it lay before it was lifted unless it already lay on a baulk-line.

39.8.2 TWO BALLS OF THE SIDE IN CONTACT OR PART OF A GROUP If the striker, being entitled to a lift or contact, lifts either ball of the side when they are in contact with each other or both are part of a group of balls, the striker may choose:

39.8.2.1 to take any of the lift or contact options to which the side is entitled with either ball; or

39.8.2.2 to take croquet with either ball from the partner ball; or

39.8.2.3 if the two balls of the side are part of a group, to use either ball and take croquet from any other ball in the group

until the first stroke is played.

39.8.3 BALL IN CONTACT WITH AN OPPONENT'S BALL When the striker is entitled to a lift or contact, if the striker lifts a ball of the side that is already in contact with an opponent's ball, or is part of a 3-ball group with the opponent's two balls, the striker must play the lifted ball. The striker remains entitled to:

39.8.3.1 choose any of the lift or contact options to which the side is entitled; or

39.8.3.2 take croquet from that opponent's ball, or either of the other balls in the group, as the case may be

until the first stroke is played.

39.8.4 CHANGING POSITION OF LIFTED BALL If the striker lifts a ball of the side under Laws 39.3.2 or 39.5.2 and places it on an unoccupied point on either baulk-line or lawfully in contact with another ball, the striker remains entitled to play the ball from any other position permitted under whichever of those laws is applicable until the first stroke is played.

B SUPER-ADVANCED SINGLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of super-advanced singles play, the laws applicable to level singles play apply with the addition of Laws 40 and 41.

40 OPTIONAL LIFT OR CONTACT OR FREE PLACEMENT

40.1 LIFT HOOPS The lift hoops are hoops 4, 7 and 10 (4, 1-back and 4-back).

40.2 WHEN ENTITLED TO A LIFT The striker is entitled to a lift when the striker's ball of the preceding turn scored any one of the lift hoops for itself in that turn and the striker's entitlement to lifts and contact has not ended under Law 40.8.

40.3 HOW TO PLAY THE LIFT TURN The striker must start the turn:

40.3.1 by playing as the balls lie; or

40.3.2 by lifting either ball of the side that can lawfully be played, even if it is in contact with one or more balls, and playing it from any unoccupied point on either baulk-line. If the lifted ball can contact another ball when so placed on the baulk-line, the striker may take croquet immediately from that ball under Law 18.1.3.2, but is not entitled to take croquet immediately from any other ball in a group of which the two balls may form part.

40.4 WHEN ENTITLED TO A CONTACT The striker is entitled to a contact when:

40.4.1 the striker's ball of the preceding turn scored two consecutive lift hoops for itself in that turn; and

40.4.2 its partner ball had not scored the first of those two lift hoops before that turn; and

40.4.3 the striker's entitlement to lifts and contact has not ended under Law 40.8.

40.5 HOW TO PLAY THE CONTACT TURN The striker must start the turn:

40.5.1 as in Laws 40.3.1 or 40.3.2; or

40.5.2 by lifting either ball of the side that can lawfully be played, even if it is in contact with one or more balls, placing it in contact with any ball and taking croquet forthwith.

40.6 WHEN ENTITLED TO A FREE PLACEMENT The striker is entitled to a free placement when:

40.6.1 the striker's ball of the preceding turn scored all three of the lift hoops for itself in that turn; and

40.6.2 its partner ball had not scored the first of the lift hoops before that turn; and

40.6.3 no ball has been pegged out by either player during the game.

40.7 HOW TO PLAY THE FREE PLACEMENT The striker must start the turn by:

40.7.1 playing as the balls lie; or

40.7.2 taking an optional lift or contact as in Laws 40.3.2 or 40.5.2; or

40.7.3 taking a free placement by lifting either ball of the side that can lawfully be played, even if it is in contact with one or more balls, and playing it from any unoccupied position on the court, including a position within the yard-line area.

40.8 ENDING OF ENTITLEMENT TO LIFTS AND CONTACT The striker is not entitled to a lift or contact under this law after pegging out any ball during the game.

40.9 THIRD AND FOURTH TURNS OF THE GAME If the striker of the third or fourth turn of the game is entitled to a contact or a free placement under Laws 40.4 or 40.6 respectively, the striker may play the ball into the game in accordance with Laws 11.2.2.2 or 11.2.2.3 respectively.

40.10 CHANGE OF DECISION

40.10.1 BALL NOT IN CONTACT WITH ANOTHER BALL If the striker lifts a ball of the side that is not in contact with another ball when entitled to a lift, contact or free placement, the ball lifted is thereby chosen as the striker's ball and the striker may not then play with the other ball of the side. Doing so is playing a wrong ball and Law 27 applies. When the side is entitled to a lift or contact, the striker must take that lift or contact and may not play the lifted ball from where it lay before it was lifted unless it already lay on a baulk-line.

40.10.2 TWO BALLS OF THE SIDE IN CONTACT OR PART OF A GROUP If the striker, being entitled to a lift or contact or free placement, lifts either ball of the side when they are in contact with each other or both are part of a group of balls, the striker may choose:

40.10.2.1 to take any of the lift, contact or free placement options to which the side is entitled with either ball; or

40.10.2.2 to take croquet with either ball from the partner ball; or

40.10.2.3 if the two balls of the side are part of a group, to use either ball and take croquet from any other ball in the group

until the first stroke is played.

40.10.3 BALL IN CONTACT WITH AN OPPONENT'S BALL When the striker is entitled to a lift, contact or free placement, if the striker lifts a ball of the side that is already in contact with an opponent's ball, or is part of a 3-ball group with the opponent's two balls, the striker must play the lifted ball. The striker remains entitled to:

40.10.3.1 choose to take any of the lift, contact or free placement options to which the side is entitled; or

40.10.3.2 take croquet from that opponent's ball, or either of the other balls in the group, as the case may be

until the first stroke is played.

40.10.4 CHANGING POSITION OF LIFTED BALL If the striker lifts a ball of the side under Laws 40.3.2 or 40.5.2 and places it on an unoccupied point on either baulk-line or lawfully in contact with another ball, or lifts it and places it anywhere on the court under Law 40.7.3, the striker remains entitled to play the ball from any other position permitted under whichever of those laws is applicable until the first stroke is played.

40.11 SHORTENED GAMES Super-advanced play may not be used in shortened games.

41 RESTRICTED OPENING

41.1 In the first stroke of the game, if the striker's ball does not:

41.1.1 leave the court; or

41.1.2 hit or pass through a hoop; or

41.1.3 hit the peg

then before the start of the second turn the opponent may choose either to leave the ball played in the first turn where it lies or to have it placed on any point on either baulk-line as its owner chooses.

C HANDICAP SINGLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of handicap singles play, the laws applicable to level singles play apply with the addition of Laws 42 to 44.

42 BISQUES

42.1 HOW PLAYED A half-bisque or bisque may be played by the striker only with the striker's ball of the immediately preceding turn, except in situations covered by Law 42.6. If another ball is played, a wrong ball error is committed and Law 27 applies. No point may be scored for any ball during a half-bisque.

42.2 NUMBER OF BISQUES TO BE GIVEN

42.2.1 The number of bisques given by the lower-handicapped player to the higher is the difference between their handicaps (see Laws 47.1 and 50.1 for doubles play).

42.2.2 A bisque may not be split into two half-bisques.

42.3 WHEN A HALF-BISQUE OR BISQUE MAY BE PLAYED

42.3.1 Subject to the restrictions imposed at the expiry of a time limit under Law 61.2.1, the player receiving a half-bisque or one or more bisques may play it or them at the end of any of that player's turns except a turn in which the striker's ball is pegged out. A player who receives more than one may play them separately or some or all in succession.

42.3.2 Law 42.3.1 overrides Law 11 and permits a half-bisque or bisque to be played after any of the first three non-bisque turns of the game.

42.3.3 The references in Laws 11.2 and 27 to specific turns following the start of the game, and in Law 27.3 to a turn when specifying the limit of claims for playing a wrong ball, do not include a half-bisque or bisque.

42.3.4 If the striker is entitled to play a half-bisque or bisque following a turn, that turn ends only when the striker has taken a decision and all of the conditions specified in Laws 7.5.1 or 7.5.2.1 for end of turn have been met, except that if the striker elects to play a half-bisque or bisque it is not necessary for the clips to be correctly positioned before the striker does so.

42.4 INDICATION OF INTENTION

42.4.1 At the conclusion of a turn the striker must give a clear and prompt indication of intention before playing a half-bisque or bisque to which the striker is entitled. If the striker fails to do so but continues to play, no half-bisque or bisque is played and the striker is playing when not entitled under Law 26. If the error is rectified, however, the striker may then play a half-bisque or bisque.

42.4.2 When entitled to play either a half-bisque or a bisque and having indicated an intention of playing one or the other, the striker may change the decision at any time before playing a stroke provided the revised decision is indicated accordingly. If the striker indicates an intention of playing one or the other without specifying which, it is deemed that the intention is to play a bisque.

42.4.3 If the striker has played all of the strokes permitted in a turn and indicates an intention not to play a half-bisque or bisque, either by words or by quitting the court without informing the opponent that the matter has not yet been decided, the striker may not reverse the decision.

42.4.4 The opponent must not start a turn until the striker has so indicated. If the opponent does so and the opponent's error of playing when not entitled is discovered before the striker has quitted the court, the error is rectified and the striker then chooses whether or not to play a half-bisque or bisque.

42.5 PLAYING A HALF-BISQUE OR BISQUE TOO SOON The opponent must forestall play upon observing that the striker is about to play a half-bisque or bisque before the turn has ended (see Law 42.3.4). If the opponent fails to forestall and the striker plays a half-bisque or bisque prematurely, it is deemed that the striker's turn ended before doing so.

42.6 PLAYING A WRONG BALL If the striker plays a wrong ball in the first stroke of a non-bisque turn and the error is rectified, the striker may then play a half-bisque or bisque with either ball of the side that could lawfully have been played in the first stroke of the turn. If the striker plays a wrong ball at any other time and the error is rectified, the striker may then play a half-bisque or bisque using what should have been the striker's ball in the first stroke in error.

42.7 FALSE INFORMATION OR MISPLACED BALL OR CLIP For handicap play, the expression 'line of play' includes a decision whether or not to play a half-bisque or bisque.

42.8 RECTIFICATION OF FAULTS After committing a fault, the striker may delay a decision about playing a half-bisque or bisque until the opponent has decided about rectification.

43 PEGGING OUT IN HANDICAP GAMES

The striker may not peg out the striker's ball in a stroke unless, either before or during that stroke, the partner ball becomes a rover ball or an opponent's ball is pegged out. Should the striker do so and remove the striker's ball from the court, Law 31 applies.

44 RESTORATION OF BISQUES

44.1 RESTORATION AFTER AN ERROR

44.1.1 If an error is rectified, any half-bisque or bisque played by the striker after the first stroke in error is restored.

44.1.2 If a game is restarted under Law 27.5, any half-bisque or bisque played by either player is restored.

44.1.3 If any point is cancelled because it is discovered before the end of the game that it was scored out of order, any half-bisque or bisque played by the striker is restored if it was played with the relevant ball as the striker's ball after the first hoop was run out of order with that ball.

44.2 RESTORATION AFTER INTERFERENCE If play is cancelled following discovery of an interference under Laws 31 to 33, any half-bisque or bisque played during such play is restored.

D DOUBLES PLAY

Games of doubles may be played as ordinary doubles play or alternate stroke doubles play. Each form may be played as level, advanced, super-advanced or handicap doubles. The laws of singles play apply to both forms of the game with the addition of Laws 45 to 47 for ordinary doubles play and Laws 48 to 50 for alternate stroke doubles play.

45 ORDINARY LEVEL DOUBLES PLAY

45.1 AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME The game is played between two sides, each of two players. Each player may strike only one ball during the game as determined by the first stroke played by the side. It is not necessary for both players of a side to be present before the game can start or during play, but should one player be absent at the start and arrive later, the conditions for an event may dictate when that player may first play a turn.

45.2 ASSISTANCE TO PARTNER The partner may advise and instruct the striker and assist in the playing of a stroke by indicating the direction in which the mallet is to be swung and by placing balls, although this must not be at the cost of maintaining expedition in play (see Law 56.3). When a stroke is played, however, the partner must stand well clear of the striker and of any spot which might assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of the stroke. Either player of a side may declare a stroke to have been played with a ball. If it is the side's first stroke of the game, the player making the declaration will own the ball unless the contrary is stated.

45.3 MODIFICATION OF TERMS

45.3.1 In these laws "partner's ball" is substituted for "partner ball" and, where appropriate, the words "player" and "opponent" also include "side" and the word "striker" includes "striker's partner". The only such modification to the term "striker" in Law 29.1 (faults), however, is as set out in Law 45.3.2.

45.3.2 Law 29.1.11 is modified to read in part

… a fault is committed if, during the striking period, the striker touches any ball other than the striker's ball with the mallet or the partner touches any ball with a mallet;

and Law 29.1.12 is modified to read in part

… a fault is committed if, during the striking period, the striker or the partner touches any ball with any part of the body;

except that no fault is committed under either of these modified laws if the partner moves, picks up or arrests a ball:

45.3.2.1 that is not relevant to the stroke; or

45.3.2.2 in accordance with Laws 5.3.2 (temporary removal of a ball) or 17.3.1 (ball remaining in play after making a roquet) or 22.3.2 (ball remaining in play when it scores a peg point).

45.4 PLAYING A WRONG BALL No point may be scored by the striker for the partner's ball by striking it. Any point apparently so scored must be cancelled if discovered at any time before the end of the game and, if a peg point has been apparently so scored, Law 31 applies.

45.5 FALSE INFORMATION OR MISPLACED BALL OR CLIP If a side is entitled to a replay under Law 32 from the start of a non-bisque turn, either player may play in the replay.

46 ORDINARY ADVANCED OR SUPER-ADVANCED DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of ordinary advanced or super-advanced doubles play, Law 45 applies with the addition of Law 39 or Laws 40 and 41 respectively.

47 ORDINARY HANDICAP DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of ordinary handicap doubles play, Law 45 applies with the addition of Laws 42 to 44 and the following additional Laws.

47.1 NUMBER OF BISQUES TO BE GIVEN The number of bisques given by the lower-handicapped side to the higher is half the difference between their aggregate handicaps. A fraction of a bisque above a half is counted as one bisque, a fraction below a half as a half-bisque. Law 42.2.1 is replaced by this determination.

47.2 PLAYING A WRONG BALL The first sentence of Law 42.6 does not apply. If the striker plays a wrong ball in the first stroke of a non-bisque turn and the error is rectified, either player who could lawfully have played the first stroke of the turn may then play a half-bisque or a bisque.

47.3 PEELS Neither player of a side may peel the partner's ball through more than four hoops in the course of a game. This limit is modified for shortened games in accordance with Law 53.2.

48 ALTERNATE STROKE LEVEL DOUBLES PLAY

48.1 AN OUTLINE OF THE GAME The game is played between two sides, each of two players. Subject to Laws 48.4 to 48.6 below, the players of a side play alternate strokes throughout each of the side's turns and from one turn to the next. Both players of the side must be present for the game to start and absence may be subject to sanctions as determined by tournament or match organisers.

48.2 ASSISTANCE TO PARTNER The partner may advise and instruct the striker and assist in the playing of a stroke by indicating the direction in which the mallet is to be swung and by placing balls, although this must not be at the cost of maintaining expedition in play (see Law 56.3). When a stroke is played, however, the partner must stand well clear of the striker and of any spot which might assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of the stroke.

48.3 MODIFICATION OF TERMS

48.3.1 In these laws, where appropriate, the words "player" and "opponent" also include "side" and the word "striker" includes "striker's partner". The only such modification to the term "striker" in Law 29.1 (faults), however, is as set out in Law 48.3.2.

48.3.2 Law 29.1.11 is modified to read in part

… a fault is committed if, during the striking period, the striker touches any ball other than the striker's ball with the mallet or the partner touches any ball with a mallet;

and Law 29.1.12 is modified to read in part

… a fault is committed if, during the striking period, the striker or the partner touches any ball with any part of the body;

except that no fault is committed under either of these modified laws if the striker's partner moves, picks up or arrests a ball:

48.3.2.1 that is not relevant to the stroke; or

48.3.2.2 in accordance with Laws 5.3.2 (temporary removal of a ball) or 17.3.1 (ball remaining in play after making a roquet) or 22.3 (ball remaining in play when it scores a peg point).

48.4 PLAYING OUT OF SEQUENCE

48.4.1 A player who observes that another player is about to play out of sequence by playing two strokes consecutively or playing the first stroke of a turn after having played the last stroke of the side's previous turn must forestall play immediately.

48.4.2 If a player plays out of sequence as defined in Law 48.4.1, except when the player is required to play consecutive strokes under Laws 48.5 or 48.6, and the error is discovered before the limit of claims, the error is rectified.

48.4.3 The strokes in error must then be analysed to determine how play continues. For this purpose, the strokes in error shall be treated as though they were played by the correct players. If any of the turn-ending events set out in Law 7.6 have occurred during any of the strokes in error, the side's turn ends. Otherwise, the player who should have played the first stroke in error then plays.

48.4.4 If the error is discovered after the limit of claims, it is not rectified and play continues according to the sequence established during the strokes in error.

48.4.5 The limit of claims is when the offending side's third stroke in error is played.

48.5 RECTIFICATION OF ERRORS If rectification of an error other than under Law 48.4 requires a stroke to be replayed, the same player replays it. When rectification of an error results in the turn ending, the partner of the player who played the first stroke in error starts that side's next turn.

48.6 INTERFERENCES

48.6.1 If play is cancelled following discovery of an interference under Laws 31 to 33, the player who played the first affected stroke plays the next stroke to be played by the side.

48.6.2 If a stroke is to be replayed following discovery of an interference under Laws 34, 35 or 38.2, the player who played the affected stroke replays it.

48.7 RE-ESTABLISHING A SEQUENCE WHEN IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED WHICH PLAYER SHOULD PLAY

48.7.1 When an error is rectified or an interference redressed and it cannot be established which player played the last stroke before the error occurred or the interference affected play, the player who plays the side's next stroke shall be the partner of the player who played the side's last stroke before the error or interference was discovered.

48.7.2 When a side is about to begin a turn and it cannot be established which player played the last stroke of the side's previous turn, the opposing side shall choose which player is to play.

49 ALTERNATE STROKE ADVANCED OR SUPER-ADVANCED DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of alternate stroke advanced or super-advanced doubles play, Law 48 applies with the addition of Law 39 or Laws 40 and 41 respectively.

50 ALTERNATE STROKE HANDICAP DOUBLES PLAY

When a game is played under the conditions of alternate stroke handicap doubles play, Law 48 applies with the addition of Laws 42 to 44 and the following additional laws.

50.1 NUMBER OF BISQUES TO BE GIVEN The number of bisques given by the lower-handicapped side to the higher is half the difference between their aggregate handicaps. A fraction of a bisque above a half is counted as one bisque, a fraction below a half as a half-bisque. Law 42.2.1 is replaced by this determination.

50.2 PLAYING A WRONG BALL The first sentence of Law 42.6 does not apply. If the striker plays a wrong ball in the first stroke of a non-bisque turn and the error is rectified, the partner may then play a half-bisque or bisque with either ball of the side that could lawfully have been played in the first stroke of the turn.

50.3 PEELS There is no restriction on the number of hoops that either player of a side may score by peeling.

E SHORTENED GAMES

51 SHORTENED GAMES

51.1 22-POINT GAME The game is started with all the clips on hoop 3.

51.2 18-POINT GAME The following variations are permitted.

51.2.1 The game is started with all the clips on hoop 5.

51.2.2 The game is started with all the clips on hoop 1 and the peg point is the next point in order after hoop 8 (2-back).

51.2.3 This variation is for singles or alternate stroke doubles play only. The game is started with all the clips on hoop 1, but as soon as one of the balls of a side either scores hoop 1 for itself or is peeled through hoop 1 by an opponent, hoop 9 (3-back) becomes the hoop in order for its partner ball and the appropriate clip is moved to that hoop immediately. A ball cannot score hoop 1 by being peeled by its partner ball.

51.3 14-POINT GAME The game is started with all the clips on hoop 1 and the peg point is the next point in order after hoop 6.

51.4 ROVER BALL In all of the variations covered in Laws 51.1 to 51.3, a ball becomes a rover ball when it has scored all of the hoop points described in those variations.

52 ADVANCED PLAY IN SHORTENED GAMES

52.1 22-POINT GAME Law 39 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) applies unchanged.

52.2 18-POINT GAME Law 39 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) applies with the omission of Laws 39.4 and 39.5. The lift hoops are as specified in Law 39.1, except for the variation specified in Law 51.2.2, for which they are hoops 4 and 6.

52.3 14-POINT GAME - LIFT VERSION Law 39 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) applies with the omission of Laws 39.4 and 39.5 and with hoop 4 as the only lift hoop.

52.4 14-POINT GAME - LIFT OR CONTACT VERSION Law 39 (optional lift or contact in advanced play) applies with hoops 3 and 4 as the lift hoops.

53 HANDICAP PLAY IN SHORTENED GAMES

53.1 BISQUES The number of bisques to be given in a shortened game is the number that would be given under Law 42.2.1 in singles play, or Laws 47.1 or 50.1 in doubles play (before rounding), scaled down in accordance with Schedule 1.

53.2 PEELS In ordinary handicap doubles play, Law 47.3 is modified so that the number of permitted peels is reduced as follows.

53.2.1 22- or 18-point games: three hoops.

53.2.2 14-point games: two hoops.

PART 4 CONDUCT OF THE GAME

A GENERAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

54 THE STATE OF THE GAME

A player is entitled to ask the opponent about the state of the game at any time and the opponent must reply as fully as possible. If the opponent gives information that proves to be incorrect, Law 32 may apply.

55 RESPONSIBILITY FOR CONDUCT OF THE GAME

55.1 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PLAYERS

55.1.1 The players are jointly responsible for the conduct of the game in the absence of a referee in charge and thereby incur duties as well as rights, as defined in Law 55.2. In doubles play, all four players share responsibility for the conduct of the game.

55.1.2 A player is not obliged to watch the game while the opponent is the striker, but ceases to have duties associated with the conduct of the game while not so watching. Should the opponent be absent from the vicinity of the court, the striker must ask a referee to assist in the situations specified in Law 55.3.

55.2 DUTIES OF A PLAYER

55.2.1 The striker must immediately cease play and announce any error or interference that the striker believes or suspects may have been committed. The striker retains this obligation even when a referee is active or a stroke is being watched under Law 55.4.1.

55.2.2 The opponent must immediately forestall play in accordance with Law 23 in relation to any error or interference that the opponent becomes aware of or suspects, notwithstanding that it may be to the opponent's disadvantage to do so.

55.2.3 Further examples of the duties of a player include, without limitation:

55.2.3.1 a player must immediately draw attention to a misplaced clip, subject to the restrictions on when a player should forestall specified in Law 23.3;

55.2.3.2 the opponent must inform the striker that the striker must complete a turn by playing another stroke, if the opponent observes the striker about to leave the court in the erroneous belief that the turn has ended (see Law 38.1);

55.2.3.3 in handicap play the opponent must similarly inform the striker of the obligation to complete a turn if the striker announces an intention of playing a half-bisque or bisque before having played all of the strokes the striker is already entitled to play (see Law 42.5);

55.2.3.4 a player must on request give the opponent any information concerning the state of the game (see Law 54).

55.3 CONSULTING A REFEREE OR THE OPPONENT

55.3.1 The striker must either ask a referee to become involved or consult the opponent and, when appropriate, invite the opponent to act jointly with the striker in each of the following situations:

55.3.1.1 before moving a ball to avoid interference in accordance with Laws 37.2 to 37.4; or

55.3.1.2 before temporarily removing a ball in accordance with Law 5.3.2 if it is in a critical position; or

55.3.1.3 before playing a stroke that may be a critical stroke following interference with a ball between strokes in accordance with Law 36.4; or

55.3.1.4 before testing, in a manner which might disturb a ball or other equipment, whether a ball has scored a hoop point, is in a position to score a hoop point, is off the court, is entitled to a wiring lift, or will be in or out of contact with another ball when placed on the yard-line; or

55.3.1.5 before otherwise taking a close decision in accordance with Law 55.5.

55.3.2 If the opponent is consulted in accordance with Law 55.3.1 and requests adjudication, the striker must ask a referee to assist. Should no referee be available, the striker must arrange for an independent person to adjudicate or, failing that, ask the opponent to do so.

55.4 QUESTIONABLE STROKES

55.4.1 Before playing a questionable stroke, the striker must either consult the opponent about the need for adjudication or call a referee to adjudicate the stroke. If no referee is available but the opponent requests adjudication, the striker must arrange for an independent person to adjudicate or, failing that, ask the opponent to do so. The striker must inform whoever is adjudicating the stroke what the striker intends to do.

55.4.2 It is the striker's duty to take the initiative in this respect, but should the striker fail to do so, the opponent should forestall play (see Law 23.2.1 and Law 26 if the striker fails to cease play) and request adjudication.

55.4.3 If both the striker and the opponent fail to call a referee to adjudicate a stroke before it is played, the opponent may seek afterwards to have a fault declared by a referee. The referee may then award a fault only if satisfied that it was committed on the basis of:

55.4.3.1 facts about the stroke agreed by the striker and the opponent; or

55.4.3.2 the evidence of the striker; or

55.4.3.3 the referee's observations of the stroke, its effects and its outcome; or

55.4.3.4 the evidence of well-placed neutral witnesses, excluding the opponent, whom the referee chooses to consult believing that they have sufficient understanding of relevant laws.

55.5 PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STRIKER The opponent must not follow the striker around the court and should allow most decisions to be made by the striker without reference to the opponent. If a close decision has to be made, however, and the opponent is in at least as good a position to give that decision as the striker, the striker must take the initiative and consult the opponent in accordance with Law 55.3 before continuing to play.

55.6 WHEN THE PLAYERS' OPINIONS DIFFER

55.6.1 If a ball has to be placed or replaced because of the carelessness of a player or if there has been interference by an outside agency that was not moved or removed in accordance with Law 34.6.1, the non-offending side's opinion should normally prevail unless the offending side is well placed to make a judgement and the non-offending side is not.

55.6.2 In other cases, the opinion of the player better placed to make a judgement is generally to be preferred. When the question is whether a ball has been hit or has moved, however, the opinion that there was contact or movement is generally to be preferred provided the player holding that opinion is well placed to make a judgement.

55.6.3 If there are any reliable witnesses present the players should agree to consult them to help resolve any differences, but no player may consult a witness without the express permission of the other. Either player may ask a referee to adjudicate.

56 EXPEDITION IN PLAY

56.1 GENERAL The striker must position the balls and play the strokes of a turn with reasonable despatch. The opponent should anticipate as far as possible which ball will be the striker's ball for the next turn so that time is not wasted in approaching it at the start of the turn. A player who fails to play with reasonable despatch or deliberately plays more slowly in the latter stages of a time-limited game will be considered to be wasting time and action may be taken in accordance with Law 63.5.

56.2 HANDICAP PLAY In handicap play, the striker must indicate promptly at the end of a turn whether or not a half-bisque or bisque will then be played.

56.3 DOUBLES PLAY In all forms of doubles, time must not be wasted in prolonged discussion or instruction. In alternate stroke doubles, the partner should help speed up play by retrieving and placing balls and, so far as possible, being ready to play the next stroke.

56.4 WIRING TEST The restrictions on testing to determine whether a ball is wired specified in Law 16.5.1 must be respected and time must not be wasted in protracted examination of the situation.

57 ADVICE AND AIDS

57.1 ADVICE A player is not entitled to receive advice from anyone other than the partner in doubles play but the player may take advantage of advice provided by the opponent in breach of Law 58.1. Situations where a player receives unsolicited information or advice from anyone who is not a participant in the game concerning the state of the game or any aspect of the player's play are covered by Laws 57.5 to 57.7.

57.2 PLAYERS MUST NOT SEEK ADVICE During a game, a player must not:

57.2.1 refer to information relevant to the game in the form of printed, handwritten, electronic or other prepared material except for the purpose of clarifying the laws, refereeing regulations, tournament regulations, or event conditions that apply to a circumstance that has arisen or may be about to arise; or

57.2.2 watch, listen to or read any commentary about the game; or

57.2.3 seek advice from anyone who is not a participant in the game on any aspect of the game, except that:

57.2.3.1 the player may seek information about the Laws or state of the game from an active referee or a timekeeper; and

57.2.3.2 the two sides may agree to call a referee or ask an observer about the state of the game or a situation that has occurred when they are uncertain about what has occurred or the laws applicable to the situation; or

57.2.4 seek or accept coaching from anyone except the partner in doubles.

57.3 PENALTIES FOR A PLAYER SEEKING ADVICE If a player is found to be in breach of Law 57.2, a referee appealed to should impose a penalty:

57.3.1 as recommended in Law 63.6.1 if the player is either the striker or the striker's partner in doubles; or

57.3.2 as recommended in Law 63.6.2 if the player is an opponent

unless the situation is such that the referee decides that a different penalty would be more appropriate.

57.4 SPECTATORS SHOULD NOT PROVIDE ADVICE

57.4.1 Spectators, and in particular fellow team members or team officials in a teams' competition and other competitors in a tournament, should not provide advice to the players in a game concerning any aspect of the game and should refrain from making comments about the play that could provide advice in a manner likely to be overheard by a player.

57.4.2 Should such advice be provided, whether deliberately or inadvertently, by team members or team officials when the game is part of a team competition, the recipient of the advice may not act on that advice.

57.4.3 Should such advice be provided by fellow competitors or other spectators, the tournament manager or the tournament referee may take action in accordance with tournament regulations or event conditions. Spectators, including fellow competitors, infringing this law may also be asked to move from the vicinity of the players.

57.5 UNSOLICITED ADVICE THAT AN ERROR OR INTERFERENCE HAS BEEN COMMITTED

57.5.1 If someone other than the partner in doubles, the opponent or a duly authorised referee informs:

57.5.1.1 a player of an error committed by the player, and does so after the player has quitted the court believing that the requirements of Law 7.5.1 for ending a turn have been met, the player must not declare the error; or

57.5.1.2 the striker of an error committed by the striker, the striker must immediately declare the alleged error; or

57.5.1.3 the opponent that the striker has allegedly committed an error, the opponent must immediately forestall play, subject to the restrictions specified in Law 23.3; or

57.5.1.4 a player that an interference under Laws 31 to 33 has been committed, the player must immediately declare the alleged interference.

57.5.2 In Laws 57.5.1.2, 57.5.1.3 and 57.5.1.4, the claimed error or interference must be investigated. If the claim is found to be correct and the error's or interference's limit of claims has not passed, it must be dealt with. The overriding law (Law 63 and in particular Law 63.4) must then be applied when necessary to restore the balance of the game as nearly as possible to its state before the unsolicited information or advice was given.

57.6 UNSOLICITED ADVICE THAT A MISTAKE IS ABOUT TO BE COMMITTED

57.6.1 Notwithstanding Law 57.1, should the striker receive unsolicited information or advice that the striker is about to play when not entitled, commit an error under Law 28 that does not carry an end of turn penalty, or involve a ball that is an outside agency in the play, the striker may act on that information or advice.

57.6.2 Should the striker receive unsolicited information or advice that the striker is about to run a wrong hoop, play a wrong ball, or play a croquet stroke involving a dead ball, the striker must inform the opponent that the information or advice has been received. The striker may act on that information or advice but if it is correct may not score any further points in that turn.

57.6.3 Both the striker and the opponent are entitled to ask a referee to act under the overriding law (Law 63 and in particular Law 63.4.6) to restore the balance of the game should they consider that their interests have been unduly affected by the unsolicited information or advice and the remedies prescribed under Laws 57.6.1 or 57.6.2.

57.7 OTHER UNSOLICITED ADVICE Should a player receive unsolicited information or advice relevant to the game or the player's play not covered by Laws 57.5 or 57.6, the player must inform the opponent. Both the striker and the opponent are entitled to ask a referee to act under the overriding law (Law 63 and in particular Law 63.4.10) to restore the balance of the game should they consider that their interests have been unduly affected by the unsolicited information or advice.

57.8 USING ARTIFICIAL AIDS The striker may not make use of artificial aids to assist in placing balls for a stroke, excepting the use of material to assist in making a ball hold its position in accordance with Law 5.3.3.

57.9 THE USE OF HEADPHONES

57.9.1 The striker may not wear headphones or earplugs capable of receiving advice electronically from an outside source unless the functionality enabling receipt of such advice is disabled while the game is in progress. The use of hearing aids by a player who normally wears them is not restricted by this law except that functionality enabling receipt of advice electronically must be disabled while the game is in progress unless the player receives permission from an event's manager to use such functionality during the event.

57.9.2 The striker may not use headphones or earplugs in a manner that makes it difficult to communicate with the striker for purposes such as forestalling. A player infringing this law may be required to remove headphones or earplugs by a referee at the referee's own initiative or in response to a request from another player that the referee considers justifiable.

57.10 MARKERS No mark or marker may be made or placed inside or outside the court to assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of a stroke or in placing a ball for a stroke, other than as follows:

57.10.1 the striker's mallet or that of the partner in doubles play may be used as a marker before the stroke starts; and

57.10.2 the striker's partner in doubles play may act as a marker before the stroke starts but must stand clear in accordance with Laws 45.2 or 48.2 when the stroke is played; and

57.10.3 ball markers may be used to mark the position of a ball that must be temporarily removed or may have to be replaced.

57.11 TRIAL BALL During a game a player must not use a ball as a trial ball for any purpose other than as part of the lawful positioning of a ball for a stroke or to permit the discharge of duties associated with the conduct of the game.

58 MISCELLANEOUS LAWS OF CONDUCT

58.1 INTERRUPTING THE STRIKER The opponent must not interrupt, distract, interfere with or offer advice to the striker except to forestall play in accordance with Law 23.2. If the opponent does so, the overriding law (Law 63) may apply and the striker may take advantage of any such advice.

58.2 PRESENCE ON COURT The opponent must not ordinarily remain on the court when the striker is playing or move onto it until the striker's turn has ended and, in handicap play, until the striker has indicated an intention not to play a half-bisque or bisque. This need not apply if play has reached a stage where the players have reasonable expectations that turns will comprise only one or two strokes.

B SPECIAL LAWS

59 DOUBLE-BANKED GAMES

59.1 GENERAL More than one game may be played concurrently on one court using differently coloured sets of balls. The players, balls, clips and mallets of one game are outside agencies with respect to the other game.

59.2 PRECEDENCE Except when a ball in a critical position may interfere with play in the other game as specified in Law 59.3.2, precedence should normally be given to players in the following order:

59.2.1 to a player who will not require balls from another game to be marked and moved;

59.2.2 to a player who is most likely to get clear of the relevant area first;

59.2.3 to a player who is making a break;

59.2.4 to a player of a game that is time limited and has less than 15 minutes remaining; if both games are in that state, to the player whose game has less time remaining.

59.3 MARKING BALLS If a ball from another game might interfere with a player's next stroke:

59.3.1 if it is not in a critical position, the permission of the players of the other game must be obtained, provided they are in the vicinity of the court, so that it may be temporarily removed after its position has been marked;

59.3.2 if it is in a critical position, the player should normally interrupt the turn until it is moved in the normal course of play in the other game. The ball's position may, however, be marked by a referee if available or one of the players, provided the players of the other game who are available to be consulted give their permission, and it may then be temporarily removed.

59.4 ADDITIONAL LAWS OF CONDUCT

59.4.1 The players of each game should be aware of the course of play in the other game, especially when stepping onto the court. In particular, they should avoid crossing another player's line of aim. Interference by balls or players of the other game is dealt with under Laws 34 and 35.

59.4.2 All players should carry suitable ball markers.

59.4.3 In doubles play, the striker's partner should be ready to mark balls in either game on the court.

59.4.4 One game should not normally be started within five minutes of the start of the other game.

60 TOURNAMENT AND MATCH PLAY

In tournaments and matches the following additional laws apply.

60.1 REGULATIONS FOR TOURNAMENTS The laws are subject to any provisions in the current tournament regulations published by the governing body under whose jurisdiction the tournament or match is taking place, or in event conditions published under them.

60.2 HOOP DIMENSIONS The hoops shall be set according to the conditions advertised for the event. Hoops with larger uprights and crowns may also be specified.

60.3 QUESTIONABLE STROKES A referee must always be called if available before a questionable stroke is played and to decide all disputes. If both the striker and the opponent fail to call a referee before what the opponent should have recognised as a questionable stroke, the opponent may appeal in accordance with Law 55.4.3 or on a question of law.

60.4 TESTING The players should call a referee to perform any test normally carried out by the players. During such a test both players are entitled to be on the court to watch, provided they do not interfere, and either has the right of appeal to the Tournament Referee if that player believes the test is being conducted incorrectly.

60.5 REPEATED FAULTS If the opponent believes that the striker is repeatedly committing faults in strokes that would not ordinarily require the presence of a referee, the opponent should inform the striker and call a referee to watch a stroke or series of strokes or to take charge of the game temporarily. The striker has no justification for taking offence, as players may genuinely differ as to what constitutes a fault.

60.6 IMPASSE An impasse exists when neither side is willing to make significant progress. Impasses are resolved according to the procedure set out in Appendix 7.

60.7 DOUBLE-BANKED GAMES Double-banked games are additionally subject to any relevant provisions in the tournament regulations.

61 TIME-LIMITED GAMES

61.1 PROCEDURE WHEN TIME EXPIRES

61.1.1 When a game is time-limited, the players should arrange for an independent person or, failing that, one of themselves to be responsible for announcing audibly that the time limit has been reached.

61.1.2 For the sole purpose of determining whether the striker's turn ends before or after time is called, the striker's turn ends and the opponent's turn begins as soon as the striker plays the last stroke of the turn, subject to Laws 61.1.3 to 61.1.5 concerning the discovery of errors and interferences.

61.1.3 If the striker plays the last stroke of a turn and it is then discovered before the first stroke of the next turn is played that the striker has committed an error under Laws 26 to 29 for which the limit of claims has not passed, for the purpose of Law 61.1.2 the striker's turn does not end until the error has been dealt with.

61.1.4 In alternate stroke doubles, if a side plays the last stroke of a turn and it is then discovered before the first stroke of the next turn is played that the side has committed an error under Law 48.4 for which the limit of claims has not passed, for the purpose of Law 61.1.2 the side's turn does not end until the error has been dealt with.

61.1.5 For the purpose of Law 61.1.2, if a stroke has to be replayed to remedy an interference under Laws 31 to 35 or Law 38, the time remaining when the replayed stroke is played is reset to what it was when the original stroke was played.

61.1.6 After time has expired, play continues for an extension period in which the striker completes the turn in progress and, unless the game has been won in accordance with Law 7.3.1 in that turn, the opponent plays one subsequent turn.

61.1.7 At the end of the extension period, if the game has not been won in accordance with Law 7.3.1, the side for which the greater number of points has been scored is the winner. If the scores are equal, play continues and the side for which the next point is scored is the winner, with any points scored subsequently in the stroke being ignored.

61.2 HANDICAP PLAY

61.2.1 No half-bisque or bisque may be played at the end of either of the two turns that comprise the extension period. If play continues after the end of the extension period under Law 61.1.7, any half-bisque or bisque may then be played.

61.2.2 For the purpose of this law, a half-bisque or bisque is played when the first stroke of that turn is played. Accordingly, if a player indicates an intention to play a half-bisque or bisque but does not play its first stroke before time is called, the half-bisque or bisque has not been played and the opponent's turn began before time was called.

61.3 RESTORATION OF TIME

61.3.1 ERRORS Time is not restored following discovery of an error, whether before or after its limit of claims, except in the circumstances covered by Law 61.4.

61.3.2 INTERFERENCES Time is restored if an interference under Laws 31 to 35 or Law 38 is discovered before its limit of claims.

61.4 SUSPENSION OF TIME Unless otherwise specified in tournament regulations or event conditions, time is suspended only if play ceases for any of the following reasons:

61.4.1 REFEREEING a refereeing event such as resetting equipment or repairing damage, but not normally for testing for wiring nor merely when a referee is called to watch a stroke;

61.4.2 LOST BALL a lost ball being searched for or replaced;

61.4.3 PLAYER UNAVAILABLE a player having been called away on official tournament duties or becoming unable to play owing to illness or injury;

61.4.4 ADJOURNMENT the game being pegged down or the players taking a meal break;

61.4.5 OTHER DELAY any other event or situation, including weather and disruption by double-banking, that leads to a delay of at least 5 minutes.

62 LOCAL LAWS

Clubs or persons controlling courts may request the appropriate governing body to approve a local law in order to meet a special need. If a local law is so approved, play must be in accordance with it provided it is properly advertised at the club or courts concerned.

63 OVERRIDING LAW

63.1 INTERPRETATION In any case where the interpretation of a law is uncertain, players and referees should refer to the Official Rulings on the Laws of Association Croquet. If no definitive answer is thereby obtained, they should have regard to the spirit and traditions of the game and apply the interpretation most consistent with the intent of the laws in analogous cases.

63.2 EMERGENCY PROVISION The following situations must be dealt with in accordance with Law 63.3:

63.2.1 a deliberate breach of these laws or encouragement of another player to do so; or

63.2.2 an infringement of these laws for which no penalty is otherwise prescribed; or

63.2.3 a situation where this overriding law is stated to be potentially relevant (see Laws 4.3.1, 4.5, 34.6.2, 35.2, 36.5.2, 57.5.2, 57.6.3, 57.7 and 58.1) and is invoked; or

63.2.4 any situation which does not appear to be adequately covered by these laws.

63.3 EXTENT OF REMEDY In applying the emergency provision of Law 63.2, a referee must act as best meets the justice of the case. The actions a referee may take include, but are not limited to, directing that:

63.3.1 the position of one or more balls or hoops or the peg be changed; or

63.3.2 one or more points be scored or lost; or

63.3.3 a stroke must be played from a particular position; or

63.3.4 a particular player shall have the innings; or

63.3.5 an error discovered before the limit of claims be left unrectified; or

63.3.6 an interference be left unremedied; or

63.3.7 time be restored in a time-limited game; or

63.3.8 one or more bisques be restored in a handicap game; or

63.3.9 a player forfeit a game or match or be disqualified.

63.4 RESTORING THE BALANCE OF THE GAME

63.4.1 ADVICE THAT AN ERROR OR INTERFERENCE HAS BEEN COMMITTED When a referee is asked to act to restore the balance of the game after an error or interference has been dealt with in accordance with Law 57.5.2, the referee should apply a remedy that best meets the justice of the case.

63.4.2 The remedies that the referee may apply will depend on the referee's assessment of the likelihood of the error or interference being discovered by either side before its limit of claims had the advice not been given and by the nature of the penalty associated with the error or interference. The referee should be guided, without limitation, by the options specified in Laws 63.4.3 to 63.4.5.

63.4.3 If in the referee's opinion it is unlikely that the error or interference would otherwise have been discovered before its limit of claims, the referee may direct that:

63.4.3.1 the striker continue the turn without penalty or restriction after the error has been rectified or the interference redressed; or

63.4.3.2 the striker continue the turn once the error has been rectified or the interference redressed, setting aside any requirement that the error should end the turn, but with restrictions the referee considers reasonable on what the striker may do thereafter during the turn. Those restrictions may include a limit on the number of points the striker may score during the remainder of the turn.

63.4.4 If in the referee's opinion it is plausible that the error or interference may otherwise have been discovered before its limit of claims, the referee may direct that:

63.4.4.1 the striker continue the turn as in Law 63.4.3.2 above; or

63.4.4.2 once the error has been rectified or the interference redressed the striker may play one further stroke, playing the striker's ball into the type of neutral position specified by the referee.

63.4.5 If in the referee's opinion it is likely that the error or interference would otherwise have been discovered before its limit of claims, the referee may direct that:

63.4.5.1 the striker may proceed as in Law 63.4.4.2 above; or

63.4.5.2 the error should be rectified or the interference redressed and the penalty applicable to the error or interference should take immediate effect.

63.4.6 ADVICE THAT THE STRIKER WAS ABOUT TO COMMIT A MISTAKE When a referee is asked to act to restore the balance of the game in accordance with Law 57.6.3, the referee should consider the likelihood that the striker would otherwise have discovered the mistake before committing it and what advantage the striker would gain by acting on the advice as provided in Laws 57.6.1 or 57.6.2. The referee should then apply a remedy that best meets the justice of the case, being guided, without limitation, by the options specified in Laws 63.4.7 to 63.4.9.

63.4.7 If the referee considers it likely that the striker would have discovered the mistake before committing it the referee may not only confirm that the striker may act on the advice but also remove the restriction on the striker's play imposed by Law 57.6.2.

63.4.8 If the referee considers it unclear whether the striker would otherwise have discovered the mistake before committing it, the referee may confirm the guidance provided by Laws 57.6.1 and 57.6.2 and in addition impose such restriction on how the striker may continue the turn as appears appropriate.

63.4.9 If the referee considers that the striker would gain a significant advantage and would have been unlikely otherwise to have discovered the mistake before committing it, the referee may direct that the striker may not proceed as described in Laws 57.6.1 and 57.6.2 but should instead play the striker's ball into the type of neutral position specified by the referee.

63.4.10 OTHER ADVICE When a referee is asked to act to restore the balance of the game in accordance with Law 57.7, the referee should consider what advantage the player would gain by acting on the advice. If the referee concludes the advantage would not be significant, the player should be informed that it is permissible to act on the advice without penalty. If the referee concludes that a significant advantage would be gained and the player acts on the advice, the referee should apply Law 63.2 to negate the advantage as far as possible.

63.5 ADDRESSING THE ISSUE OF TIME WASTING

63.5.1 Should a player consider that the opposing side is wasting time in breach of Law 56, the player must first inform the opposing side of the player's concern. Should this not immediately produce sufficient change to alleviate the player's concern, the player is entitled to ask a referee to adjudicate.

63.5.2 A referee asked to adjudicate on time wasting should inform both sides that play will be watched and a decision on whether time is being wasted will result.

63.5.3 The referee should watch the play and if the referee concludes that a player or players are not playing with reasonable despatch, should warn the players that action will be taken at any point thereafter if the speed of play does not improve. The referee should indicate the nature of any action that will be taken.

63.5.4 If at any stage the referee concludes that time is not being wasted, both sides should be informed of the referee's decision and the referee should thereafter cease to watch play and take no action unless a fresh complaint is made.

63.5.5 If the referee concludes after a warning has been given that the speed of play of a player or players remains unsatisfactory, the referee may take action at any time in accordance with Law 63.5.6. The referee must then act as necessary to monitor and enforce the action being taken but that does not of itself give the referee the status of a supervising referee.

63.5.6 The options open to the referee include but are not limited to:

63.5.6.1 adding extra time to a time-limited game when time wasting occurs towards the end of the game, this additional time to be not less than 10 minutes; or

63.5.6.2 deciding that, subject to Law 63.5.7, a cumulative time limit shall apply to each turn of both sides, including the first stroke of the turn. The time limit shall be five minutes, extended by three minutes each time a point is scored by the striker's ball or by peeling.

63.5.7 If a cumulative time limit for a turn is used, the time the striker is obliged to cease play due to double-banking shall be excluded unless the referee decides that the striker is stopping play unnecessarily.

63.5.8 If the cumulative time limit on a turn expires, the striker may then complete the turn by playing a maximum of eight further strokes, which may include scoring hoop or peg points, within a three-minute period.

63.5.9 The manager of a tournament or event may specify before the tournament or event starts that time limits different from those specified in Laws 63.5.6.2 and 63.5.8 shall apply to all games in the tournament or event on which a cumulative time limit is imposed by a referee. Should the manager do so, the competitors in the tournament or event must be informed before play starts what limits will apply.

63.5.10 In a multi-game match, action in regard to time wasting shall carry over from one game to the next. Any time used in a period of extra time added under Law 63.5.6.1 will count against the time limit on subsequent games of the match.

63.6 PENALTIES FOR A PLAYER SEEKING ADVICE

63.6.1 PENALTIES FOR THE STRIKER SEEKING ADVICE If the striker, or the striker's side in doubles, is found to be in breach of Law 57.2:

63.6.1.1 on the first occasion during a match the striker, or the striker's side in doubles, is found to have committed such a breach, the striker shall be permitted to play only one further stroke in the turn after the breach is discovered; and

63.6.1.2 on the second occasion during a match the striker, or the striker's side in doubles, is found to have committed such a breach, whether of the same type or a different type and regardless of whether the first breach occurred while the player concerned was the striker, the striker's partner in doubles, or the opponent, the striker's turn shall end immediately the second breach is discovered; and

63.6.1.3 should there be any further occurrence of any breach during the match, the player, or side in doubles, shall lose the match immediately under Law 63.3.9, regardless of whether earlier breaches occurred while the player was the striker, the striker's partner in doubles, or the opponent.

63.6.2 PENALTIES FOR THE OPPONENT SEEKING ADVICE If the opponent is found to be in breach of Law 57.2:

63.6.2.1 on the first occasion during a match such a breach occurs, the player, or side in doubles, shall be permitted to play only one stroke in the player's or side's next turn; and

63.6.2.2 on the second occasion during a match the opponent, or side in doubles, is found to have committed such a breach, whether of the same type or a different type and regardless of whether the first breach occurred while the player concerned was the striker, the striker's partner in doubles, or the opponent, the player's or side's next turn shall be forfeited; and

63.6.2.3 should there be any further occurrence of any breach during the match, the player, or side in doubles, shall lose the match immediately under Law 63.3.9, regardless of whether earlier breaches occurred while the player concerned was the striker, the striker's partner in doubles, or the opponent.

TABLE 1: ADJUDICATING CLOSE POSITIONS: SUMMARY OF THE RULINGS

The following table summarises the rulings to be given in different situations when an adjudication by a referee or the players jointly concludes that, within the limits of uncertainty inherent in the measurement, the situation is on the borderline between two options.

Law

Situation

Ruling

8.5.4

Whether the stroke the striker intends to play or has just played is a critical stroke

The stroke is critical

13.1.2

Whether a ball is on or off the court The ball is off the court

15.9

Whether a ball to be placed on the yard-line is in contact with one or more other balls

The ball shall be placed not in contact with the other ball or any of them

16.5.3

Whether one ball is wired from another The ball is wired from the other ball

20.6.1

Whether a ball has completed running its hoop in order

The ball has completed running the hoop

20.6.2

Whether a ball at rest or placed within the jaws of its hoop in order is in a position to run the hoop to score the hoop point

The ball can run the hoop to score the hoop point from that position

21.5

When the striker's ball is about to run its hoop in order, whether another ball is within the jaws of the hoop or clear of the jaws on the non-playing side

The other ball is within the jaws of the hoop

29.6

Whether a fault was committed in a stroke

A fault was committed if an adjudicator or the striker believes it more likely than not that the law was infringed

36.4

Whether the stroke the striker intends to play is a critical stroke

The stroke is critical

55.6.2

Whether a ball was hit or moved during a stroke

The opinion that the ball was hit or moved is generally to be preferred provided the player holding that opinion is well placed to make a judgement

TABLE 2: LIMITS OF CLAIMS FOR ERRORS AND INTERFERENCES

2.1 ERRORS

Law

Issue

Limit of claims

Remedy

26

Playing when not entitled

When first stroke of next turn to be started by non-offending side is played

Play by offending side is cancelled, side entitled to play then plays

26.1.3

Striker continues to play after being forestalled

When first stroke of opponent's next turn is played

All play following the forestalling cancelled and issue must be settled. Player entitled to play then plays.

27

Playing a wrong ball

When first stroke of next turn started by either side with a correct ball is played

Error rectified, turn ends

27.4

Any ball pegged out while striker playing wrong ball

End of game

Peg point cancelled and Law 31 applied

28.2.5

Miscellaneous cases of playing when ball misplaced

When stroke played

Striker continues turn with no penalty but ball's position must be corrected, if it has not been moved by play, before any further stroke in the game

28.3

Minor misplacement of ball by natural forces as stroke is about to be played

When stroke played

Striker continues turn with no penalty

28.4

Playing an unlawful croquet stroke involving a dead ball

When first stroke of opponent's next turn is played

Error rectified, turn ends

28.5

Playing an unlawful croquet stroke involving a live ball

When third stroke in error is played

Error rectified, striker resumes turn provided no turn-ending event has occurred during strokes in error

28.6

Failing to take croquet when required to do so

When third stroke in error is played

Error rectified, striker resumes turn provided no turn-ending event has occurred during strokes in error

28.7

Failing to play a ball from a baulk-line

When third stroke of the striker's turn (i.e. third stroke in error) is played

Error rectified, striker restarts turn by playing same ball from a baulk-line, provided no turn-ending event has occurred during strokes in error

28.8

Lifting a ball when not entitled to do so

When third stroke of the striker's turn (i.e. third stroke in error) is played

Error rectified, striker restarts turn with either ball of the side, provided no turn-ending event has occurred during strokes in error

29.1, 45.3.2 and 48.3.2

Fault committed by striker, or striker's partner in doubles

When third stroke in error is played

Turn ends, any points scored cancelled, opponent has choice of rectification. If rectified, balls must be placed in positions occupied before fault.

45.4

Scoring points for the partner's ball by playing it in ordinary doubles

End of game

All points scored for the partner's ball by playing it are cancelled. May result in subsequent points scored for ball by its owner being cancelled as scored out of order.

48.4

Playing out of sequence in alternate stroke doubles

When third stroke in error is played

Error rectified; correct player resumes turn provided no turn-ending event has occurred during strokes in error.

2.2 INTERFERENCES

Law

Issue

Limit of claims

Remedy

31

Ball wrongly removed or not removed from the game End of game

Play cancelled from point where it was first affected, any errors discovered must be treated, player entitled to play then plays and may choose any line of play.

32

Player misled by false information or misplaced ball or clip End of game

Player misled entitled to replay from point when play was first affected. All subsequent play cancelled, any errors discovered must be treated, player then resumes turn and must follow different line of play in replay.

32.5

Player who claimed to have been misled fails to adopt different line of play in replay

When third stroke of replay is played

Replay is cancelled and original play reinstated. Any errors discovered during cancelled replay must be treated. Player entitled to play then plays.

33.2

Player swaps ball of game with another ball of same colour and type while both are off the court End of game

As play is not affected, swap is reversed when discovered and play continues. Player who is striker when swap discovered resumes turn.

33.3

Striker involves any ball that is an outside agency in the game instead of a ball in play

End of game

All play after first stroke affected by involvement of outside agency in game or influenced by its presence on court cancelled, correct ball reinstated. Striker resumes turn, subject to remedies required for any errors discovered.

34

Outside agency or player interferes with a ball during a stroke

When next stroke is played

Striker must replay same stroke with same objectives if conditions in Law 34.2.1 satisfied. Otherwise balls placed where they would have come to rest had interference not occurred.

34.3

Striker required to replay stroke following interference with a ball fails to attempt same stroke

When next stroke is played

Opponent has choice of accepting outcome of replay or requiring striker to replay original stroke again.

34.6.2

Loose impediment interferes with stroke

When next stroke is played

No remedy, unless there are exceptional circumstances to be handled in accordance with overriding law (Law 63).

35

Outside agency or opponent interferes with playing of a stroke

When next stroke is played

Striker must replay same stroke with same objectives. Exceptional cases may be dealt with under the overriding law (Law 63).

35.3

Striker required to replay stroke following interference with the stroke fails to attempt same stroke

When next stroke is played

Opponent has choice of accepting outcome of replay or requiring striker to replay original stroke again.

36.2.1

Ball moves or is unlawfully moved by natural forces, outside agency or player other than striker between strokes

When next stroke is played

Ball must be replaced. If not replaced, Law 28 applies.

36.2.2

Striker interferes with striker's ball between strokes

When next stroke is played

Ball must be replaced. Striker may continue turn but when next stroke is a single-ball stroke may not attempt any critical stroke

36.2.3

Striker interferes with ball other than striker's ball between strokes

When next stroke is played

Ball must be replaced. Striker may continue turn but when next stroke is a single-ball stroke may not attempt any critical stroke that would involve ball interfered with.

36.5

Striker attempts a critical stroke in breach of Laws 36.2.2 or 36.2.3

When next stroke is played

Referee appealed to may use overriding law (Law 63) to impose appropriate penalty.

37.2

Fixed obstacle or change of level outside court likely to interfere with playing of next stroke

When affected stroke is played

Striker's ball may be moved to provide relief from interference. Other balls foreseeably involved in stroke must be moved similarly.

37.3

Special damage to court likely to interfere with playing of next stroke

When affected stroke is played

Repair damage where practicable. Otherwise move ball(s) to avoid damage, but never to striker's advantage.

38.1

Striker quits court mistakenly believing turn has ended

When first stroke of opponent's next turn is played

Striker is entitled to resume turn.

38.2

Stroke materially affected by ball contacting both hoop uprights simultaneously

When next stroke is played

Striker may choose to replay stroke after equipment corrected provided no unrelated fault has occurred. If replay chosen striker must attempt to get ball through hoop again. If replay not chosen outcome of original stroke stands.

38.2.4

Striker chooses replay of stroke affected by faulty equipment but does not attempt to get ball through hoop again in replay.

When next stroke is played

Opponent has choice of accepting outcome of replay or requiring further replay of attempt to get ball through hoop

Appendices

Appendix 1 Dimensions, tolerances and metric equivalents

Law

Subject

Imperial Units

Tolerance

Metric Equivalents

Tolerance

4.1

The court

35 yards
28 yards
13 yards
7 yards
1 yard

± 6 inches
± 6 inches
± 3 inches
n/a
n/a

32.0 metres
25.6 metres
11.9 metres
6.40 metres
0.914 metres

± 152 mm
± 152 mm
± 76 mm
n/a
n/a

4.4

Hoop positions 7 yards ± 12 inches 6.40 metres ± 305 mm

5.1

The peg

18 inches
6 inches
1.5 inches

± 1 inch
n/a
± ¼ inch

457 mm
152 mm
38 mm

± 25 mm
n/a
± 6mm

5.2

Hoops

12 inches

4 inches
311/16 inches
5/8 inch

+ ½ inch
- 1 inch
±1/32 inch
±1/32 inch
±1/32 inch

305 mm

102 mm
94 mm
16 mm

+12.5 mm
- 25 mm
± 0.8 mm
± 0.8 mm
± 0.8 mm

5.3

Balls

35/8 inches
16 ounces

± 1/32 inch
± ¼ ounce

92 mm
454 grams

± 0.8 mm
± 7 grams

6.2

Corner flags 12 inches n/a 305 mm n/a

6.3

Corner pegs

3 inches
¾ inch

n/a
n/a

76 mm
19mm

n/a
n/a

Appendix 2 Ball performance specifications

A2.1 When dropped from a height of 60 inches (1.52 metres) onto a steel plate 1 inch (25 mm) thick set rigidly in firmly-based concrete, a ball must rebound to a height of not less than 30 inches (0.76 metres) and not more than 45 inches (1.14 metres).

A2.2 The rebound heights of a set of balls to be used in a game must not differ by more than 3 inches (76 mm).

Appendix 3 Full bisque handicap play

When a game is played under the conditions of full bisque handicap play, the laws of handicap play apply subject to the following modifications.

A3.1 THE BASE HANDICAP The base handicap is scratch unless agreed or directed to be greater than scratch.

A3.2 SINGLES PLAY If both players have handicaps that are greater than the base handicap, Law 42.2.1 does not apply and each player receives a number of bisques equal to the difference between the player's handicap and the base handicap.

A3.3 DOUBLES PLAY

A3.3.1 NUMBER OF BISQUES If both sides have aggregate handicaps that are greater than twice the base handicap, the first sentence of Laws 47.1 or 50.1 does not apply and each side receives a number of bisques equal to half the difference between its aggregate handicap and twice the base handicap, rounded as specified in Laws 47.1 or 50.1.

A3.3.2 RESTRICTION ON PLAY In ordinary doubles play, a player whose handicap is lower than the base handicap may play a half-bisque but may not play a bisque and the second sentence of Law 47.2 is modified accordingly. This restriction does not apply to alternate stroke doubles play.

Appendix 4 Advanced handicap play

When a game is played under the conditions of advanced handicap play, the laws of both advanced play (Law 39 for singles; the relevant parts of Law 46 or Law 49 for doubles) and handicap play (Laws 42 to 44 for singles; Law 47 or Law 50 for doubles) apply subject to the following modifications.

A4.1 BISQUES IN RELATION TO LIFT OR CONTACT Any half-bisque or bisque is counted as part of the "preceding turn" for the purpose of determining the entitlement to a lift or contact under the applicable one of Laws 39, 46 and 49. There is no restriction on taking a half-bisque or bisque after a turn in which a lift or contact has been taken.

A4.2 PEGGING OUT IN ADVANCED HANDICAP GAMES The restriction on pegging out the striker's ball in Law 43 does not apply.

Appendix 5 One-ball play

When a game is played under the conditions of one-ball play, the laws applicable to level singles play, together with those of advanced (Law 39) and/or handicap (Laws 42 to 44) singles play if specified, apply subject to the following modifications.

A5.1 OBJECTIVE OF THE GAME Each side consists of a single player who plays one ball, of any distinct colour, throughout. The object of the game is for each side to make its ball score 12 hoop points and a peg point, a total of 13 points, before the other side.

A5.2 THE START OF A GAME Law 11.2.2 concerning the third and fourth turns of the game does not apply.

A5.3 ADVANCED PLAY Laws 39.4.2, 39.4.3, 39.6 and 39.7 do not apply.

A5.4 HANDICAP PLAY Unless otherwise advertised in the conditions for the event [see local variation L2 for events played under the Croquet Association's tournament regulations], the number of bisques to be given is one third of the difference between the handicaps of the players, rounded to the nearest half or full bisque, except that handicaps below 2 are adjusted as follows before taking the difference:

Player's handicap 1 ½ 0 -1 -1½ -2 -2½ -3
One-ball handicap 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5 -6 -7 -8

Appendix 6 Short croquet

Short croquet is a shortened version of the game, primarily intended for play on smaller courts. The laws of handicap singles play apply, subject to the following modifications.

A6.1 THE COURT

A6.1.1 The standard court is either:

A6.1.1.1 a rectangle measuring 24 by 16 yards (21.9 by 14.6 metres). The four outer hoops are 4 yards from the adjacent boundaries and the two inner hoops are 6 yards north and south of the peg; or

A6.1.1.2 a rectangle measuring 28 by 17.5 yards (25.6 by 16.0 metres, which is exactly half a full-size court). The four outer hoops are 4 yards from the E/W boundaries and 5 yards from the N/S boundaries and the two inner hoops are 6 yards north and south of the peg.

A6.1.2 The appropriate organising body may approve other proportions and dimensions.

A6.2 THE COURSE The game is 14 points: 6 hoops and the peg (see Law 51.3).

A6.3 THE HANDICAPPING SYSTEM The short croquet handicap table, as published by the appropriate governing body from time to time, shall be consulted with reference to each player's Association Croquet handicap to determine whether the player is obliged to make one or more mandatory peels or entitled to receive one or more bisques. If both players are entitled to receive bisques, the principles of full bisque handicap play apply and each player receives the appropriate number of bisques indicated in the table.

A6.4 MANDATORY PEELS

A6.4.1 EITHER BALL MAY BE PEELED A mandatory peel is scored when either ball of a side peels its partner ball.

A6.4.2 PLAYING WHEN NOT ENTITLED When the striker is in a position where the striker's number of mandatory peels outstanding is equal to the number of hoop points remaining to be scored by the striker's two balls, the striker's ball does not score a hoop point for itself by running its hoop in order. In these circumstances, if the striker continues to play after running the hoop as though the striker's ball had scored a hoop point for itself, Law 26 (playing when not entitled) applies.

A6.5 PEELING AN OPPONENT'S BALL An opponent's ball may be peeled without penalty, except that if the opponent has a number of mandatory peels outstanding equal to the number of hoop points remaining to be scored by the opponent's two balls, that number of mandatory peels outstanding is reduced by one for each peel made on either of the opponent's balls.

A6.6 PEGGING OUT

A6.6.1 PEGGING OUT THE STRIKER'S BALL Law 43 restricts when the striker's ball may be pegged out.

A6.6.2 NO PEGOUT BEFORE COMPLETION OF MANDATORY PEELS The striker may not score the peg point in order for the striker's ball in a stroke unless, either before or during that stroke, the striker's last mandatory peel was completed. In such circumstances, if the striker removes the striker's ball from the court after it has hit the peg, Law 31 applies.

A6.6.3 CANCELLATION OF MANDATORY PEELS If the striker pegs out an opponent's ball when the opponent still has mandatory peels outstanding, those mandatory peels are cancelled.

A6.7 WIRING LIFT Law 16 applies but the first part of Law 16.1 is amended to read "At the start of a turn, if the opponent is responsible for the position of a ball of the striker's side which is not in contact with another ball and is wired from its partner ball, as defined in Law 16.3, or, if that ball has been pegged out, from all other balls, the striker may:".

A6.8 TIME-LIMITED GAMES In a time-limited game, the winner is determined in accordance with Law 61.1.7, with any uncompleted mandatory peels being ignored.

Appendix 7 Impasse Resolution Procedure

A7.1 DECLARATION OF AN IMPASSE

A7.1.1 An impasse exists if the tactical situation is not evolving and neither side appears to be willing to attempt to score a point or otherwise to make a tactically significant move.

A7.1.2 The striker may request a referee to declare that an impasse exists or a Referee in Charge may do so.

A7.1.3 Any subsequent impasse within a single game shall be treated as a separate event.

A7.2 PROCEDURE FOLLOWING DECLARATION OF AN IMPASSE Once the referee has declared an impasse, play will continue normally for ten further turns. If the tactical situation has changed during this period, the impasse will be declared to be at an end and play will continue normally. Otherwise, all balls are removed from the court to be played from baulk back into the game, according to whichever of sections A7.3 to A7.6 is applicable.

A7.3 TWO BALLS IN PLAY BOTH FOR THE PEG

A7.3.1 A tiebreak shall be played in which the last four hoops and the peg are contested.

A7.3.2 Both clips are removed and placed on hoop 9 (3-back).

A7.3.3 A coin toss will decide which side may choose to play first or second.

A7.3.4 Play shall proceed normally except that no roquet will be allowed until the first stroke of the earlier of:

A7.3.4.1 the eleventh turn after the restart; or

A7.3.4.2 the turn after a turn in which the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself.

If, during the prohibition on roquets, the striker's ball hits, or starts a turn in contact with, the opponent's ball, the stroke will be treated as though the opponent's ball was dead.

A7.3.5 The tiebreak is a new game for the purposes of Advanced Play.

A7.3.6 The winning score will be recorded as 26-25.

A7.4 TWO BALLS IN PLAY, WHICH ARE NOT BOTH FOR THE PEG

A7.4.1 Clips remain in their current positions.

A7.4.2 A coin toss will decide which side may choose to play first or second.

A7.4.3 The restriction on roquets in A7.3.4 above will apply.

A7.5 THREE BALLS IN PLAY

A7.5.1 Clips remain in their current positions.

A7.5.2 The player with two balls remaining in play plays first.

A7.5.3 The game shall proceed normally.

A7.6 FOUR BALLS IN PLAY

A7.6.1 Clips remain in their current positions.

A7.6.2 A coin toss will decide which side may choose to play first or second.

A7.6.3 The game shall proceed normally.

SCHEDULE 1: SCHEDULE OF BISQUES

26-pt

22-pt

18-pt

14-pt

 

26-pt

22-pt

18-pt

14-pt

 

26-pt

22-pt

18-pt

14-pt

¼ 0 0 0   10¼ 7   20¼ 17 14 11
½ ½ ½ ½   10½ 9   20½ 17½ 14 11
¾ ½ ½ ½   10¾ 9 6   20¾ 17½ 14½ 11
1 1 ½ ½   11 6   21 18 14½ 11½
1 1 ½   11¼ 8 6   21¼ 18 14½ 11½
1 1   11½ 8 6   21½ 18 15 11½
1 1   11¾ 10 8   21¾ 18½ 15 11½
2 1   12 10   22 18½ 15 12
2 1   12¼ 10½   22¼ 19 15½ 12
2   12½ 10½   22½ 19 15½ 12
2   12¾ 11 9 7   22¾ 19½ 16 12½
3 2   13 11 9 7   23 19½ 16 12½
3 2   13¼ 11 9 7   23¼ 19½ 16 12½
3 2   13½ 11½   23½ 20 16½ 12½
3 2   13¾ 11½   23¾ 20 16½ 13
4 3 2   14 12   24 20½ 16½ 13
3   14¼ 12 10   24¼ 20½ 17 13
4 3   14½ 12½ 10 8   24½ 20½ 17 13
4   14¾ 12½ 10 8   24¾ 21 17 13½
5 4   15 12½ 10½ 8   25 21 17½ 13½
3   15¼ 13 10½ 8   25¼ 21½ 17½ 13½
4 3   15½ 13 10½   25½ 21½ 17½ 13½
5 4 3   15¾ 13½ 11   25¾ 22 18 14
6 5 4 3   16 13½ 11   26 22 18 14
  16¼ 14 11½ 9   26¼ 22 18 14
  16½ 14 11½ 9   26½ 22½ 18½ 14½
  16¾ 14 11½ 9   26¾ 22½ 18½ 14½
7 6 5 4   17 14½ 12 9   27 23 18½ 14½
6 5 4   17¼ 14½ 12   27¼ 23 19 14½
5 4   17½ 15 12   27½ 23½ 19 15
4   17¾ 15 12½   27¾ 23½ 19 15
8 7   18 15 12½   28 23½ 19½ 15
7   18¼ 15½ 12½ 10          
7 6   18½ 15½ 13 10          
6   18¾ 16 13 10          
9 6 5   19 16 13 10          
8 5   19¼ 16½ 13½ 10½          
8 5   19½ 16½ 13½ 10½          
7   19¾ 16½ 13½ 10½          
10 7   20 17 14 11          

INDEX

Accessories

as outside agencies 6.1.

corner pegs and flags 6.1.

Accidental contact

with ball in critical stroke counts as stroke 8.5.1.1.

with other ball between strokes, remedy 36.2.3.

with striker's ball between strokes, remedy 36.2.2.

Advanced play

striker may change placement of lifted ball on baulk-line 39.8.4.

striker's contact options in third or fourth turns 39.7.

when choice of striker's ball may be changed after lifting a ball 39.8.2.

when decision about stroke to be played may be changed after lifting a ball 39.8.3.

when decision to take lift may be changed 39.8.2, 39.8.3.

when entitlement to lifts and contact ends 39.6.

when striker entitled to contact 39.4.

when striker entitled to lift 39.2.

when striker may not change decision after lifting ball 39.8.1.

Advanced play contact

striker's options 39.5.

Advanced play lift

restriction on taking croquet when group created 39.3.2.

striker's options 39.3.

taking croquet immediately 39.3.2.

Advice

action against fellow competitors or spectators providing advice 57.4.3.

penalties for opponent seeking advice 63.6.2.

penalties for striker seeking advice 63.6.1.

player may ask about laws or state of game 57.2.3.1.

player may not act on advice from team members or officials 57.4.2.

player must not access commentary about game 57.2.2.

player must not refer to information to assist play 57.2.1.

player must not seek advice to assist play 57.2.3.

player must not seek or accept coaching 57.2.4.

players may jointly seek information to clarify situation 57.2.3.2.

spectators should refrain from providing 57.4.1.

tournament regulations or event conditions may govern breaches of advice laws 57.4.3.

Advice, unsolicited

about game or play, players' entitlement to seek redress 57.7.

about game or play, referee's options for restoring balance of game 63.4.10.

about imminent mistake, options for referee restoring balance of game 63.4.6.

about imminent mistake, restoring balance of game if mistake likely to have been discovered 63.4.7.

about imminent mistake, restoring balance of game if mistake otherwise unlikely to have been discovered 63.4.9.

about imminent mistake, restoring balance of game if unclear whether mistake would otherwise have been discovered 63.4.8.

claimed error or interference to be investigated 57.5.2.

concerning imminent mistake, players' right to appeal 57.6.3.

concerning imminent mistake, restriction on striker following 57.6.2.

concerning imminent mistake, when striker may use 57.6.1.

restoring balance of game 57.5.2, 63.4.

restoring balance of game when mistake otherwise likely to be discovered 63.4.5.

restoring balance of game when mistake otherwise unlikely to be discovered 63.4.3.

restoring balance of game when plausible mistake would otherwise be discovered 63.4.4.

restoring balance of game, referee's options 63.4.2.

striker may take advantage of advice provided by opponent 57.1.

to opponent about striker's error 57.5.1.3.

to player about an interference 57.5.1.4.

to player about error after quitting the court 57.5.1.1.

to striker about an error 57.5.1.2.

Assistance to striker

ball may not be used as trial ball 57.11.

no mark or marker may be made to assist striker in playing stroke 57.10.

partner may act as marker before stroke starts 57.10.2.

permitted uses of ball markers 57.10.3.

striker's or partner's mallet may be marker before start of stroke 57.10.1.

use of artificial aids permitted only to help hold ball in position 57.8.

Ball at rest

definition Glossary.

when ball becomes at rest 9.3.1.

when ball ceases to be at rest 9.3.2.

when ball comes to rest if position needs testing 9.4.1.

when ball comes to rest in critical position not needing testing 9.4.2.

when ball comes to rest in non-critical position 9.4.3.

Ball in hand

definition Glossary.

transition to ball at rest 9.3.1.2.

when any ball becomes in hand 9.2.1.

when ball ceases to be in hand 9.2.4.

when ball other than striker's ball becomes in hand 9.2.3.

when striker's ball becomes in hand 9.2.2.

Ball in play

definition Glossary.

when ball becomes in play 9.1.

when ball ceases to be in play 9.1.

Ball in yard-line area

placement of balls other than striker's ball 14.2.

striker's ball played from where it lies 14.1.

when striker's ball becomes in hand 14.1.

Ball moving between strokes or moved by player

remedy 36.2.1.

Ball off court

borderline case. See Borderline decisions

outside agency until replaced on court 13.1.1.

striker must consult before testing 13.2.

when ball leaves the court 13.1.1.

Ball suffering interference

may not score point, make roquet nor be roqueted 34.2.2.

when ball leaving court in croquet stroke ends turn 34.4.

Ball wrongly removed or not removed from game

limit of claims 31.4.

nature of interference 31.1.

remedy 31.3.

when play is affected 31.2.

Ball, keeping in position

permitted actions 5.3.3.

use of grass clippings etc 5.3.3.

Ball, placement on yard-line

borderline case. See Borderline decisions

direct and indirect interference, definition of 15.3.

striker's ball in hand not to interfere 15.4.

striker's options 15.5.

when other balls do not interfere 15.1.

when other balls interfere 15.2.

when striker must consult 15.8.

Ball, temporary removal of

marking position 5.3.2.

requirement to consult 5.3.2.

when permitted 5.3.2.

Balls

permitted variation in specifications 5.3.1.

specification of 5.3.1.

Baulk-lines

definition Glossary.

Bisque

definition Glossary.

Body

items included in definition Glossary.

Borderline decisions

ball on or off court 13.1.2.

placement of ball on yard-line near another 15.9.

whether ball placed in hoop for croquet stroke may score hoop point 20.6.2.

whether hoop and roquet may be made 21.5.

whether hoop point scored 20.6.1.

whether next stroke is critical 8.5.4, 36.4.

wiring test 16.5.3.

Boundary

definition when marking not straight 4.3.1.

determination when multiple markings visible 4.3.1.

use of movable cord to define 4.3.2.

Cannon

balls may be placed within yard-line area 18.4.3.

definition Glossary, 18.4.

Cannon, 3-ball

placement of balls 18.4.1.

Cannon, 4-ball

placement of balls 18.4.2.

Clips

removal to avoid interference with ball 5.4.3.

specification 5.4.1.

use to indicate score 5.4.2.

when outside agencies 5.4.4.

Conduct of game

adjudicating positions where players' opinions differ 55.6.

adjudicating problem caused by player's carelessness 55.6.1.

adjudication by independent person or opponent 55.3.2.

duty of striker to announce error or interference 55.2.1.

opponent's duty to intervene if striker about to quit court prematurely 55.2.3.2.

opponent's duty to intervene if striker about to take bisque prematurely 55.2.3.3.

opponent's obligation to draw attention to error or interference 55.2.2.

opponent's right to have fault declared in non-adjudicated stroke 55.4.3.

opponent's right to request adjudication 55.3.2.

player's obligation to draw attention to misplaced clip 55.2.3.1.

players' obligation to provide information about state of game 55.2.3.4.

players' responsibilities for 55.1.1.

striker retains obligations when referee adjudicating 55.2.1.

striker's obligation to consult, before playing questionable stroke 55.4.1.

striker's obligation to consult, general 55.3.1.

striker's obligation to consult, about close decision 55.5.

when opinion that ball was hit or moved to be preferred 55.6.2.

when player may consult witnesses 55.6.3.

Continuation stroke

definition Glossary.

may not be accumulated 19.3.

when striker entitled to 19.1.

Corner flags

placement of 6.2.

specification and placement Glossary.

Corner pegs

placement of 6.3.

specification and placement Glossary.

Court

approval of non-standard dimensions and proportions 4.2.

permitted variation in dimensions 4.1.2.

remedying material discrepancies in setting 4.5.

setting of 4.4.

smaller size permitted 4.2.

standard dimensions of 4.1.1.

Court boundaries

naming of Glossary.

Court boundary

definition Glossary.

Critical position

definition Glossary.

Critical stroke

definition Glossary.

determining whether next stroke is critical. See Borderline decisions

striker about to play when not permitted, remedy 36.5.1.

striker playing when not permitted, remedy 36.5.2.

Croquet stroke. See Taking croquet

choice of ball from which croquet is taken 18.2.

croqueted ball becomes dead when stroke played 18.6.

croqueted ball must move or shake 18.5.

definition Glossary.

how croqueted ball chosen when striker has group 18.2.3.

options when striker's ball part of group 18.2.3.

placing striker's ball for 18.3.

restriction on taking croquet when striker creates group by placing ball on baulk-line 18.2.3.

striker must play into croqueted ball 18.5.

striker must take croquet from ball roqueted 18.2.1.

striker's entitlement to continuation stroke after 18.8.

when ball off court ends turn 18.7.

when striker must take croquet at start of turn 18.2.2.

when striker must take croquet during turn 18.2.2.

Croqueted ball

definition Glossary.

Dead ball

definition Glossary.

when ball becomes dead 9.5.2.

when ball becomes live again 9.5.3.

Displaced boundary marking

adjustment of ball positions when marking straightened 38.4.4.

player's obligation to draw attention to 38.4.1.

when correction must be delayed 38.4.2.

when correction necessary before stroke or ball-off-court test 38.4.3.

Double-banking

definition Glossary.

equipment and players of one game outside agencies for other game 59.1.

interference by players or balls may result in replay 59.4.1.

moving ball in critical position permitted with permission of players in other game 59.3.2.

moving other balls, permission required 59.3.1.

precedence 59.2.

remedy for interference 59.4.1.

obligation on players to forestall out of sequence play 48.4.1.

out of sequence play limit of claims 48.4.5.

out of sequence play remedy 48.4.2.

out of sequence play validated after limit of claims 48.4.4.

out of sequence play when time expires 61.1.4.

out of sequence play, how play continues 48.4.3.

partner may advise and assist striker 48.2.

partner may move, pick up or stop ball not relevant to a stroke 48.3.2.

partner may not guide striker when stroke is played 48.2.

player who plays after long-limit interference redressed 48.6.1.

player who plays after other interference remedied 48.6.2.

player who replays stroke following an error 48.5.

player who starts next turn after turn-ending error 48.5.

Doubles play, ordinary

both players not required to be present to start game 45.1.

either player may play if turn restarted after being misled 45.5.

faults committed by striker's partner 45.3.2.

format 45.1.

limit of claims for striker invalidly scoring point for partner's ball 45.4.

modification of terms to reference partner 45.3.1.

partner may advise and assist striker 45.2.

partner may move, pick up or stop ball not relevant to a stroke 45.3.2.

partner may not guide striker when stroke is played 45.2.

player may declare partner to have played stroke 45.2.

restriction on player arriving late joining play 45.1.

striker may not score point for partner's ball by striking it 25.5.2.

striker may not score point for partner's ball by striking it 45.4.

Error

definition Glossary.

discovery after limit of claims 25.5.1.

may not deliberately be committed 25.1.

striker's obligation to declare 25.2.

when discovery occurs Glossary.

Error, rectification of

definition Glossary.

Errors and/or interferences, multiple

determination of precedence 24.3.

earlier error discovered while interference being redressed 24.4.

remedy 24.3.

summary of times of occurrence 24.2.

treatment of 24.1.

when fault must be dealt with 24.3.3.

Expedition in play

dealing with time wasting 63.5.1.

excessive discussion in doubles subject to penalty 56.3.

obligations on players 56.1.

protracted checking for wiring considered time wasting 56.4.

striker obliged to indicate promptly intentions about taking a bisque 56.2.

when action may be taken for time wasting 56.1.

Failing to play lifted ball from baulk-line

how play continues 28.7.2.

limit of claims 28.7.3.

remedy 28.7.1.

Failing to take croquet when required

how play continues 28.6.2.

limit of claims 28.6.3.

remedy 28.6.1.

Faults

actions by striker's partner in doubles that constitute faults 29.5, 45.3.2, 48.3.2.

contacting ball more than once in single-ball stroke 29.1.6.2.

damaging court with mallet 29.1.14.

exemption for multiple contacts or maintenance of contact with striker's ball 29.2.4.

exemption for multiple contacts, when not applicable 29.2.4.

fails to strike ball audibly or distinctly 29.1.3.

illegal ways of causing mallet to hit ball 29.1.4.

in croquet stroke fails to move or shake croqueted ball 29.1.13.

in croquet stroke plays away from croqueted ball 29.1.13.

incorrectly striking ball in contact with hoop or peg 29.1.9.

limit of claims 29.4.

limitation on when damaging court with mallet is a fault 29.2.3.

limitation on when failing to hit with mallet end face is a fault 29.2.3.

limitation on when touching head of mallet is a fault 29.2.1.

maintenance of contact a fault if visible, audible or deducible from consequences 29.2.7.

mallet and ball in contact for observable period 29.1.6.3.

mallet and ball in contact when ball hits hoop or peg 29.1.8.

mallet in contact with striker's ball after another ball hit 29.1.7.

moves or shakes ball by hitting hoop or peg 29.1.10.

multiple contacts with striker's ball must be seen 29.2.5.

positions of balls if fault not rectified 29.3.2.

prolonged contact a fault if visible or audible 29.2.6.

remedy, general 29.3.1.

remedy, rectification at opponent's discretion 29.3.2.

resting hand or arm on ground not a fault after having hit ball 29.2.2.

resting hand or arm on legs or feet not a fault after having hit ball 29.2.2.

rests mallet shaft, hand or arm on ground 29.1.2.

rests mallet shaft, hand or arm on legs or feet 29.1.2.

slides mallet along foot or leg 29.1.1.

standard of judgement to be applied in deciding if fault committed 29.6.

strikes ball not with end face of mallet head 29.1.5.

touches ball other than striker's ball with mallet 29.1.11.

touches ball with body 29.1.12.

touches mallet head 29.1.1.

touching mallet head not a fault after completing swing in which ball is hit 29.2.2.

when attempting to make striker's ball jump 29.2.3.2.

when committed 29.1.

when multiple contacts visible in stroke with balls in contact 29.1.6.1.

when opponent required to decide on rectification in handicap play 29.3.2.

when referee may award fault if stroke not adjudicated 55.4.3.

when striker's ball part of a group 29.2.3.3.

when stroke is hampered 29.2.3.1.

Fixed obstacle or change of level

dealing with ball in critical position 37.4.

moving striker's ball to avoid 37.2.

striker's obligation to consult about relief 37.2.

when balls moved are replaced 37.4.

when other balls must be moved 37.4.

Forestalling play

definition Glossary.

how done 23.1.

when opponent may forestall after stroke has started 23.4.

when opponent must forestall 23.2.

when opponent must not forestall 23.3.

Game

end of 7.2.

objective of 1.1.

start of 7.1.

winner of 61.1.7.

winner of 7.3.

Group of balls

3-ball group, definition Glossary.

4-ball group, definition Glossary.

Half-bisque

definition Glossary.

no point scored for any ball while playing 42.1.

Hampered stroke. See Faults when stroke is hampered

definition Glossary.

Handicap doubles

alternate stroke, no restriction on peeling 50.3.

alternate stroke, which player may take bisque after wrong ball at start of turn 50.2.

calculation of bisques to be given 47.1, 50.1.

ordinary, either player may take bisque after wrong ball at start of turn 47.2.

ordinary, limit on peeling partner's ball 47.3.

Handicap play

balls must be correctly placed before a half-bisque or bisque turn 42.3.4.

bisque may not be split into two half-bisques 42.2.2.

bisque not taken if indication of intention not given first 42.4.1.

bisque taken if striker plays without indicating which of half-bisque and bisque is being taken 42.4.2.

bisque turn must use striker's ball of preceding turn 42.1.

bisque turn not counted in determining wrong ball limit of claims 42.3.3.

bisque validly taken if striker starts turn prematurely 42.5.

bisque, opponent must forestall if striker about to play prematurely 42.5.

bisque, restriction on taking after expiry of time limit 42.3.1.

bisque, striker must clearly indicate intention of taking 42.4.1.

bisque, striker not entitled to revise decision not to take 42.4.3.

bisque, striker's right to revise decision to take 42.4.2.

bisque, when may be played 42.3.1.

clips need not be placed before a half-bisque or bisque turn 42.3.4.

determination of number of bisques to be given 42.2.1.

half-bisque, when may be played 42.3.1.

line of play includes decision on whether to take bisque 42.7.

opponent must not start turn until striker indicates decision about bisques 42.4.4.

remedy if opponent plays before striker makes decision about bisques 42.4.4.

restoration of bisques, after error rectified 44.1.1.

restoration of bisques, after interference redressed 44.2.

restoration of bisques, if game restarted 44.1.2.

restoration of bisques, if points scored out of order are cancelled 44.1.3.

restriction on pegging out striker's ball 43.

striker may require opponent to decide about rectifying fault before striker decides about taking bisque 42.8.

striker pegging out and removing striker's ball from court incorrectly 43.

striker's options after playing wrong ball during turn 42.6.

striker's options after playing wrong ball in first stroke of non-bisque turn 42.6.

Headphones or earplugs

electronic receiving functionality to be disabled 57.9.1.

restriction on use of 57.9.2.

when player may be required to remove 57.9.2.

Hearing aids

electronic receiving functionality may be restricted 57.9.1.

Hoop

adjustment of ball positions if hoop adjusted 5.2.3.4.

no adjustment of ball positions if height adjusted 5.2.3.2.

non-playing side, definition Glossary.

playing side, definition Glossary.

positions of balls to be checked and wiring tests carried out before adjustment 5.2.3.3.

projecting base cannot cause wiring 5.2.3.2.

striker's right to have checked and adjusted 5.2.3.1.

striker's right to have height adjusted 5.2.3.2.

Hoop and roquet

borderline case. See Borderline decisions

when both made in same stroke 21.2.

when hoop scored and roquet not made 21.4.

when roquet made but hoop not scored 21.3.2.

Hoop in order

ball may complete running in multiple strokes 20.2.2.

definition Glossary.

when ball completes the running 20.2.1.

when ball starts to run 20.1.

when running not completed if ball moves back into 20.2.1.

Hoop point

borderline case. See Borderline decisions

how scored Glossary, 2.4.

not scored after ball placed where started to run 20.4.2.

not scored if ball becomes in hand while running 20.2.2.

not scored if roquet made before starting to run 21.3.1.

not scored in stroke when ball enters from non-playing side 20.4.1.

scoring not affected by hoop adjustment 5.2.3.4, 20.4.3.

striker's obligation to consult before testing whether scored 20.5.

when scored 20.3.

when striker's ball may score when roquet made in same stroke 17.3.2.

Hoop, jaws of

definition Glossary.

Hoops

colouring 5.2.2.

dimensions of uprights and crown 5.2.1.2.

location 4.4.2.

order and direction of running 2.4.

permitted variation in dimensions 5.2.1.1.

permitted variation in position 4.4.3.

range of widths permitted 5.2.1.3.

required alignment of lines joining 4.4.3.

setting width to largest ball 5.2.1.3.

specification of 5.2.1.1.

square cross-section crown permitted 5.2.1.2.

uniformity of hoop widths on court 5.2.1.3.

Impasse

definition of 60.6.

procedure for dealing with 60.6.

Interference

dealing with errors discovered while redressing 24.4.

obligation on player to forestall or declare immediately 30.2.

player must not commit deliberately 30.1.

redress for long limit of claims interferences 30.3.1.

responsibility for position of ball when remedied 30.3.3.

striker's options for resuming play following 30.3.2.

when discovery occurs Glossary.

Interference with a ball

by a clip 38.3.

by outside agency, nature of interference 34.1.

by player other than the striker, nature of interference 34.1.

by the peg extension 38.3.

consequences of striker not replaying same stroke 34.3.

failure to correct position following 34.5.

remedy 34.2.1.

remedy when replay not permitted 34.2.2.

striker must attempt same stroke in replay 34.2.1.

when play is affected 34.1.

when replay is required 34.2.1.

Interference with a stroke

consequences of striker not attempting same stroke in replay 35.3.

nature of interference 35.1.

striker must attempt same stroke in replay 35.2.

when replay required 35.2.

Interference with ball between strokes

nature of interference 36.1.

Interference with playing of stroke

opponent forestalling at wrong time 23.4.

Interference, redress for

definition Glossary.

Interferences with play

definition Glossary.

Interrupting the striker

opponent must not except to forestall 58.1.

striker may act on opponent's advice 58.1.

Lift hoops

definition Glossary.

in 14-pt game lift and contact version 52.4.

in 14-pt game lift version 52.3.

in 18-pt game 52.2.

in 22-pt game 52.1.

in 26-pt game 39.1.

in super-advanced play 40.1.

Lifting a ball

permissible methods 12.3.

Lifting a ball when not entitled

how play resumes after 28.8.2.

limit of claims 28.8.3.

remedy 28.8.1.

Limit of claims

definition Glossary.

how modified when turn ends before limit 25.4.

Line of play

definition Glossary.

Live ball

definition Glossary.

status of balls at start of turn 9.5.2.

Local laws

procedure for controlling body to set 62.

Loose impediments

definition Glossary.

not normally an outside agency Glossary, 34.6.2.

removal to avoid influencing play 34.6.2.

Mallet

aiming devices not permitted 5.5.4.

edges not part of end-faces 5.5.3.

end faces not to damage balls 5.5.3.

end faces to have identical playing characteristics 5.5.1.

grip may not be moulded for striker 5.5.2.

permitted modifications for disabled player 5.5.5.

playing characteristics may not be changed 5.5.6.2.

playing characteristics of, definition Glossary.

structure 5.5.1.

use to reposition balls permitted 8.9.

when damaged mallet may be used 5.5.6.1.

when exchange permitted 5.5.6.1.

Misplaced ball

definition Glossary.

natural forces move ball after striker placed balls in contact 28.3.1.

natural forces move ball after striker placed balls out of contact 28.3.2.

opponent's obligation to forestall 28.2.1.

striker may play while ball moved for double-banked game 28.2.2.

when position becomes lawful 28.2.6.

when position is corrected 28.2.1.

Misplaced clip

duty of both players to correct position 32.6.

Natural forces

when ball moved is to be replaced 37.1.

Opponent moving onto court

when permitted 58.2.

Opponent remaining on court

not ordinarily permitted 58.2.

when permitted 58.2.

Outplayer

not obliged to watch game 55.1.2.

Outplayer absent from game

loses duties for conduct of game 55.1.2.

referee to be called when consultation required 55.1.2.

Outside agencies

clip or peg extension when unattached 38.3.

dealing with if movable 34.6.1.

definition Glossary.

examples of Glossary.

Overriding law

actions open to a referee under 63.3.

procedure for restoring balance of game after advice 63.4.

procedure in situations where interpretation of law uncertain 63.1.

situations governed by 63.2.

Partner

in alternate stroke doubles, definition Glossary.

in ordinary doubles, definition Glossary.

Partner ball

definition Glossary.

striker may not play 12.2.

Partner's ball

definition of in ordinary doubles 2.3.

Peel

definition Glossary.

no restriction on peeling in alternate stroke handicap doubles 50.3.

number permitted in ordinary handicap doubles shortened games 53.2.

restriction on peeling partner's ball in ordinary handicap doubles 47.3.

Peeling

preserving ball's rotational alignment 5.3.4.

Peg

adjustment of ball positions after straightening 5.1.4.

colouring 5.1.2.

extension as outside agency 5.1.3.

extension, specification of 5.1.3.

location 4.4.1.

permitted variation in dimensions 5.1.1.

permitted variation in position 4.4.3.

players' entitlement to have checked and adjusted 5.1.4.

specification of 5.1.1.

wiring test to be carried out before straightening 5.1.4.

Peg point

ball becomes dead immediately it scores point 22.3.1.

how scored 2.5, 22.1.1.

not scored for any ball while playing a wrong ball 22.2.6, 25.5.2, 27.4.

not scored in stroke in which roquet already made 22.2.1.

not scored solely due to peg being straightened 5.1.4, 22.2.7.

pegged out ball may be stopped if state of game not affected 22.3.2.

pegged out ball may cause other balls to move, be roqueted and score points 22.3.1.

rover ball may cause another rover ball to score 22.1.2.

two rover balls hitting peg simultaneously 22.2.5.

when may be scored 2.5.

when peg hit and roquet made simultaneously 17.2.3, 22.2.2.

when pegged out ball becomes outside agency 22.4.

when scored by playing rover ball in contact with peg 22.2.3.

Pegged out ball

improperly left on court 22.4.

when removal may be delayed 22.4.

when removed from court 22.4.

Player being misled

nature of the interference 32.1.

Player misled by false information

remedy 32.3.

when entitled to replay 32.1.1.

when play affected 32.2.

Player misled by false information or misplaced ball or clip

limit of claims 32.4.

options in replay 32.3.

Player misled by misplaced ball

when entitled to replay 32.1.2.

Player misled by misplaced ball or clip

remedy 32.3.

when play affected 32.2.

Player misled by misplaced clip

when entitled to replay 32.1.3.

Player playing when misled

dealing with earlier errors following cancelled replay 32.5.2.

failure to adopt a different line of play in replay 32.5.1.

failure to adopt different line of play in replay, limit of claims 32.5.3.

Player unable to play correct ball on fourth turn 27.5.

Playing a ball from another game

interference, not an error 27.1.2.

Playing a wrong ball

at start of any of first four turns of game 27.2.2.

limit of claims 27.3.

no peg point may be scored while playing 25.5.2.

remedy 27.2.1.

responsibility for positions of balls after playing in first stroke 16.2.2.1.

striker plays ball already in play in third or fourth turns 27.1.1.4.

striker plays ball of other side 27.1.1.2.

striker plays partner's ball in ordinary doubles 27.1.1.3.

striker switches balls during turn 27.1.1.1.

striker switches balls when taking bisque 27.1.1.5.

striking the partner ball 12.2.

striking the partner ball or ball of the other side 2.2.

striking the partner's ball in ordinary doubles 2.3.

when ball wrongly played into game becomes ball in play 27.2.3.

when initial choice of colours is reversed 27.6.

Playing when ball misplaced

ball moved by natural forces 28.3.

failing to play lifted ball from baulk-line 16.6.1, 28.7.

failing to take croquet when required 28.6.

lifting a ball when not entitled 28.8.

scope of error 28.1.

striker may play while ball moved for double-banked game 28.2.2.

taking croquet from a dead ball 28.4.

taking croquet from live ball when not entitled to do so 28.5.

taking croquet unlawfully from a live ball 28.5.

taking croquet with striker's ball placed in contact with more than one live ball 28.5.

Playing when not entitled

both sides play simultaneously 26.1.2.

limit of claims 26.3.

player continues after being forestalled 26.1.3.

player continues after turn ends 26.1.1.

remedy 26.2.

scope of error 26.1.

striker continues after being forestalled 23.1.

striker plays before previous stroke ended 26.1.4.

Questionable stroke

adjudication in tournament and match play 60.3.

definition Glossary.

examples of Glossary.

opponent's right to intervene should striker not consult 55.4.2.

right of appeal if stroke not adjudicated 60.3.

striker's obligation before playing 55.4.1.

Rectification of error

actions involved 25.3.1.

replacement of ball after fault 25.3.1.

which balls are live if turn continues 25.3.2.

Refereeing

options for restoring balance of game following unsolicited advice 63.4.2, 63.4.6, 63.4.10.

players' right of appeal against conduct of testing 60.4.

players' right to watch testing 60.4.

power to award penalty for player seeking advice 57.3.

when entitled to award fault if stroke not adjudicated 55.4.3.

Repeated faults by player

procedure for dealing with allegations 60.5.

Replay

definition Glossary.

Replay after interference by faulty equipment

consequences of striker not replaying same stroke 38.2.4.

Responsibility for position of ball

after wrong ball played 16.2.2.1.

general 16.2.1.

when stroke declared 16.2.2.2.

Roquet

definition Glossary.

made only on first live ball hit in stroke 17.2.1.

when made 17.1.

when made during a croquet stroke 17.2.4.

when striker's ball hits two live balls simultaneously 17.2.2.

when striker's ball may be stopped after making 17.3.1.

Roquet, consequences of

ball cannot score peg point in same stroke 17.3.3.

striker's ball becomes in hand at end of stroke 17.3.4.

striker's ball remains in play following 17.3.1.

when hoop point may be scored in same stroke 17.3.2, 21.2.

Rotational alignment

of a ball, preserving 5.3.4.

Rover ball

definition Glossary.

pegging out another rover ball 2.5.

Shortened games

18-pt game, no optional contact 52.2.

limits on peeling partner's ball in ordinary handicap doubles 53.2.

modification of advanced play law 52.

number of bisques to be given in handicap play 53.1.

options for 18-point game 51.2.

super-advanced play, not permitted in 40.11.

Special damage to court

dealing with ball in critical position 37.4.

definition Glossary.

examples of Glossary.

exclusions Glossary.

moving balls to avoid 37.3.

repair where practicable 37.3.

striker's obligation to consult 37.3.

when balls moved are replaced 37.4.

when other balls must be moved 37.4.

Start of game

alternation of first choice in multi-game match 10.2.

options for side losing toss 10.2.

options for side winning toss 10.2.

player of fourth turn unable to play correct ball 11.2.3.

playing the first ball 11.1.

playing the second ball 11.2.1.

playing the third and fourth turns 11.2.2.

restriction on ball from which croquet may be taken 11.2.2.1.

third and fourth turns, striker's options when entitled to contact 11.2.2.2.

third and fourth turns, striker's options when entitled to free placement 11.2.2.3.

valid choices may not be revoked 10.3.

when ball may be played in by taking croquet 11.2.1, 11.2.2.1.

who has first choice 10.1.

State of the game

definition Glossary.

incorrect information received may entitle player to replay 54.

player's right to seek information from opponent 54.

Striker

definition Glossary.

Striker interfering with another ball between strokes

remedy 36.2.3.

restriction on next stroke 36.2.3.

Striker interfering with any ball between strokes

exemptions from restrictions on next stroke 36.3.

Striker interfering with striker's ball between strokes

remedy 36.2.2.

restriction on next stroke 36.2.2.

Striker quitting court before turn has ended

limit of claims 38.1.

opponent's obligation to intervene 38.1.

remedy 38.1.

Striker's ball

definition Glossary.

effect of hitting a dead ball 9.5.4.

Striker's ball, choice of

by lifting wired ball 16.6.1.

by taking a lift or contact 39.8.1.

by taking a lift, contact or free placement 40.10.1.

how made 12.2.

Striking period

definition Glossary.

end of 8.6.

start of 8.2.

Striking period, cancellation of

when and how permitted 8.4.1.

Stroke

declaration counts as playing a stroke 8.8.1.

definition Glossary.

end of 8.7.

start of 8.2.

when may be played before end of previous stroke 8.1.2.

when may lawfully be played 8.1.1.

when played 8.3.

Stroke affected by incorrect hoop width or faulty ball

consequences of failure to replay stroke correctly 38.2.4.

remedy 38.2.2.

replay must attempt to get ball through hoop again 38.2.2.

striker's right to request check 38.2.1.

time taken to check restored 38.2.1.

when original outcome stands 38.2.3.

when striker entitled to a remedy 38.2.2.

Stroke, cancellation of

when and how permitted 8.4.1.

Stroke, critical

contact with any ball is a stroke 8.5.1.1.

when accidental contact law does not apply 8.5.1.2.

Stroke, declaration of

causing end of turn 7.6.4.

definition Glossary.

how and when declaration may be made 8.8.1.

responsibility for positions of balls following 16.2.2.2.

striker to indicate ball to which declaration applies 8.8.2.

Stroke, non-critical

accidental contact not a stroke 8.5.2.

when annulled following accidental contact 8.5.2.3.

when stroke is played following accidental contact 8.5.2.2.

Strokes in error

definition Glossary.

Super-advanced play

restriction on first turn 41.1.

striker may change placement of lifted ball on baulk line 40.10.4.

striker's contact and free placement options in third or fourth turns 40.9.

when choice of striker's ball may be changed after lifting a ball 40.10.2.

when decision about stroke to be played may be changed after lifting a ball 40.10.3.

when decision to take lift may be changed 40.10.2, 40.10.3.

when entitlement to lifts and contact ends 40.8.

when entitlements to free placement end 40.6.3.

when striker entitled to contact 40.4.

when striker entitled to free placement 40.6.

when striker entitled to lift 40.2.

when striker may not change decision after lifting ball 40.10.1.

Super-advanced play contact

striker's options 40.5.

Super-advanced play free placement

striker's options 40.7.

Super-advanced play lift

restriction on taking croquet when group created 40.3.2.

striker's options 40.3.

taking croquet immediately 40.3.2.

Taking croquet

definition Glossary.

when required 18.1.

when roquet made in preceding stroke 18.1.1.

when striker's ball lawfully in contact with another ball at start of turn 18.1.3.1.

when striker's ball lawfully in contact with live ball during turn 18.1.2.

when striker's ball lawfully placed in contact with another ball before first stroke 18.1.3.2.

Taking croquet from a dead ball

limit of claims 28.4.2.

not permitted 9.5.5.

remedy 28.4.1.

Taking croquet unlawfully from a live ball

how play continues 28.5.2.

limit of claims 28.5.3.

remedy 28.5.1.

Time limits

arrangements for announcing 61.1.1.

error discovered to be dealt with before turn ends 61.1.3, 61.1.4.

extension period, definition of 61.1.6.

interference requiring replay causes time reset 61.1.5.

when turn ends for timing purposes 61.1.2.

Time wasting

action to remedy to carry over in multi-game match 63.5.10.

how players should address issue 63.5.1.

manager's power to vary cumulative time limits 63.5.9.

procedure if cumulative time limit expires 63.5.8.

referee may act after issuing warning 63.5.5.

referee's procedure for addressing 63.5.2.

remedy, referee may add time to game 63.5.6.1.

remedy, referee may impose cumulative time limit on turns 63.5.6.2.

Time-limited games

circumstances when suspension of time permitted 61.4.

determination of winner 7.3.2, 61.1.7.

restriction on use of bisques once time expires 61.2.1.

time not restored following discovery of error 61.3.1.

time not suspended for normal refereeing calls 61.4.1.

when bisque is played for timing purposes 61.2.2.

when disruption by weather, double-banking etc permits suspension of time 61.4.5.

when time restored following discovery of interference 61.3.2.

when time suspended if player unavailable 61.4.3.

Tournament and match play

hoop settings specified in event conditions 60.2.

laws subject to tournament regulations 60.1.

questionable strokes to be adjudicated 60.3.

Turn

continuing following a continuation stroke 2.6.9.

continuing following a croquet stroke 2.6.8.

continuing when hoop point scored 2.6.5.

continuing when hoop point scored 20.7.

continuing when roquet made 2.6.6.

end of when bisque played prematurely 7.6.5.

end of when striker quits court prematurely 7.6.6.

end of, definition 7.5.

end of, definition in timed games 7.5.

entitlement to play either ball 2.6.1, 12.1.

events causing turn to end 7.6.

limitation on taking croquet from other balls 2.6.10.

start of, definition 7.4.

striker's initial entitlement to one stroke 2.6.2.

when first stroke may be a croquet stroke 2.6.3.

when striker is entitled to continue 2.6.4.

when striker required to play croquet stroke 2.6.7.

where striker's ball must be played from 2.6.4.

Using a ball that is an outside agency

how striker may resume play once redressed 33.4.

inadvertent ball swap 33.2.

limit of claims 33.5.

nature of the interference 33.1.

remedy when play affected 33.4.

when play affected 33.3.

Weather

no remedy when stroke affected by 37.1.

not an outside agency Glossary.

Wiring

borderline case. See Borderline decisions

by impeding direct course of ball 16.3.1.

by impeding swing of mallet prior to impact 16.3.3.

hoop or peg interfering with stance cannot cause wiring 16.4.1.

if relevant ball has to pass through hoop to hit target ball 16.3.2.

mallet to be used for testing 16.4.2.

when relevant ball is within jaws of hoop 16.3.4.

when swing is impeded 16.4.1.

Wiring lift

lifted ball to be played from baulk 16.6.1.

right to reposition lifted ball on baulk-line 16.6.2.

striker's entitlement to 16.1.

striker's obligation to consult when claiming 16.5.1.

when player may request a test 16.5.2.

Wiring lift creating a group

restriction on taking croquet 16.1.2.

Wrong ball

definition Glossary.

Yard-line

definition Glossary.

when positions of balls lying on are to be adjusted 15.7.

Yard-line area

definition Glossary.

Yard-line ball

definition Glossary.