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The Laws of Golf Croquet (3rd Edition, 2008)

NB. 3rd Edition Superseded by The Rules of Golf Croquet (4th Edition).

Note

Council has agreed that, for specific events in the CA Calendar, a trial version of the Wrong Ball Law (Law 11) will be used. In other CA listed events the use of the trial law will be optional. Each Federation will determine when the trial law is to be used in Federation events.

Trial ended

Contents

Introduction
1. Outline of the game
2. The Standard Court
3. Equipment
4. Accessories
5. The Start
6. The Turn
7. Scoring a Point
8. Advice
9. Interference
10. The Halfway Law
11. Playing a Wrong Ball
12. Non-striking Faults
13. Striking Faults
14. Etiquette
15. Refereeing
16. Handicaps
Commentaries

Introduction

Status of These Laws

At the meeting of the CA Council on Saturday 19 January 2008, the Council agreed that the wording of the WCF Golf Croquet Rules 2007 Edition should be adopted as the Laws of Golf Croquet for use in the Domain of the Croquet Association and would come into force on March 15 2008. Council also recognised the concerns of the CA Golf Croquet Laws Committee (GCLC) that there were some foreseeable situations that are not covered by the WCF text and they authorised the GCLC to add any rulings to each law that they considered necessary to cover these exceptions. These rulings shall form part of the Laws of Golf Croquet. This site now displays the main wording of the the new laws together with all present rulings and commentaries.

As we gain experience with the new laws there are situations where we wish to amend or add to existing laws and commentaries which appear in our laws books. Such changes are listed in the table below and appear in blue text on the relevant page. Their rulings have the same standing as the laws themselves.

Initially most of the rulings listed below originated from our own GC Laws Committee, however as the WCF GC Rules Committee have now instigated a formal procedure for dealing with weaknesses in the rules, we feel the time is right to use the exact WCF wording. Our own Laws Committee have had a major input to the new WCF Rulings. The new wording has been defined on our pages as "International Ruling" The new rulings replace the existing CA rulings but also cover additional subjects. Download and print the International Rulings for Laws of Golf Croquet to stick in your copy of the Laws.

Chairman GC Laws Committee

Changes Summary

Item Date Details

Law 5
The Start

August 2010 Ruling to define exactly when a game starts so that wrong ball and lawn damage penalties can be applied plus clarification of wrong ball play in the first four turns.

Law 6
The Turn

August 2010 Ruling to clarify the situation where a player accidentally nudges an opponent's ball prior to making contact with his own ball

Law 8
Advice

August 2010 Ruling to clarify the position of a player who acts on incorrect information from his opponent.

Law 9 Interference

August 2010 Ruling to clarify the situation when two opposing players play simultaneously or almost simultaneously

Law 9 Interference

January 2011 Ruling to clarify status of clips used to denote score

Law 10
The Half Way Law

August 2010 Rulings to prevent a player from escaping the halfway law penalty by deliberately committing a non striking fault and to clarify the half-way rule exceptions when a ball touching an opponent's ball is hit away from that ball.

Law 12 Non-Striking Faults

March 2012 Ruling to prevent lawn damage by a ball during the execution of a legal jump shot being classified as a fault by clause 12(b) of the Non-striking Fault law.

Law 15
Refereeing

August 2010 Ruling to clarify the powers of a spectator referee when he hears a player attempt to claim a hoop point from a hoop run out of order

1. Outline of the Game

(a) The game is played by striking a ball with a mallet. It is played as either doubles with four players or singles with two players. In doubles one side of two players plays with blue and black balls and the other side with red and yellow, each player playing only one colour. In singles each player plays both balls of the side.

(b) The object of the game is for each side to cause either ball of its side to run hoops in a specified order. A point is scored for the side whose ball first runs the hoop in order in accordance with Law 7.

(c) A match is a contest for the best of 1, 3 or 5 games of 7, 13 or 19-Points. Each game ends as soon as one side (the winner) has scored a majority of the points to be played. Alternative endings which may be used include playing to a 2 point advantage or using a time limit. If the players leave the court or start another game having agreed which side has won, then the game has ended with the agreed result.

(d) The hoops are contested as shown in Diagram 1. In a 7-Point game the first 7 hoops are played. In a 13-Point game the first 12 hoops are played and the 13th point is scored by contesting hoop 3 again. In a 19-Point game the first 12 hoops are played, then hoops 3, 4, 1, 2, 11 and 12 are played again as hoops 13 to 18 respectively. The 19th point is scored by contesting hoop 3 again.

(e) The balls are played in the sequence blue, red, black and yellow. After whichever ball was last played, the next ball in this sequence is known as the striker's ball, and the owner of that ball is the striker. C1.1

CA Ruling

Law 1(e) is to be interpreted as if the following sentence were added at the end of the Law: "In singles, the ball owned by the striker that is not the striker's ball is known as the partner ball."

(f) Either side may score only the hoop that is the current hoop in order. When that hoop has been scored by any ball, either side may score only the next hoop in order.

CA Ruling

A ball may score two hoops in order in the same stroke.

(g) Two games may be played simultaneously on the same court, normally using alternative coloured balls or striped balls. If this is done all players are to be aware of the other game and are to try to avoid any conflicts. The position of balls from the other game may be marked with permission from the participants of that game. Interference between balls in different games is dealt with by Law 9.

2. The Standard Court

(a) The court is a rectangle, measuring 35 by 28 yards (32 by 25.6 metres). Its boundaries are to be marked clearly, the inner edge of the definitive border being the actual boundary. Diagram 1 shows the setting. The corners are known as corners I, II, III, and IV and the boundaries as south, west, north and east, regardless of the actual orientation of the court. The peg is set in the centre of the court. The hoops are set parallel to the north and south boundaries, the centres of the two inner hoops are 7 yards (6.4 metres) to the north and south of the peg and the centres of the four outer hoops are 7 yards (6.4 metres) from the adjacent boundaries.

(b) If there is insufficient space for a full size court a smaller court or one with different proportions may be laid out. If this is done the peg is to remain on the line between hoops 5 and 6.

DIAGRAM 1
court layout

3. Equipment

(a) The hoop uprights are to be of round metal of uniform diameter of 5/8 inch (16 mm) above the ground. The hoops are to be no more than 12 inches (305 mm) and no less than 11 inches (280mm) in height above the ground measured to the top of the crown, vertical and firmly fixed The crown is to be round or square in section, straight and at right angles to the uprights, whose inner surfaces are to be approximately parallel and not less than 311/16 inches (93.7 mm) or more than 4 inches (101.4 mm) apart. The gap between the uprights of all hoops on a court are to be the same to a tolerance of nominal width plus or minus 1/32 inch (0.8mm), and the gaps on all hoops at a height of 113/16 inches (46 mm) above the level of the court are to be at least 1/32 inch (0.8 mm) greater than the largest diameter of the balls in use on that court. The hoops are to be white, with the crown of the first hoop blue. The crown of the last hoop may be red.

(b) The peg is to have a uniform diameter of 11/2 inches (38 mm) and a height of 18 inches (457 mm) above ground. It is to be vertical and firmly fixed in the ground. It is to be white to a height of 6 inches (150 mm) above the ground with blue, red, black and yellow bands descending in that order from the top.

(c) The four balls are usually coloured blue, red, black and yellow, but alternative colours or striped balls are permitted. Balls are to be 35/8 inches (92 mm) plus or minus 1/32 inch (0.8 mm) in diameter, with a weight of 16 ounces (454 grams), plus or minus 1/4 ounce (7 grams). Balls are to be approved by the country of play or, in the case of WCF events, by the WCF. Faulty or damaged balls may be changed at any time during a game. Where several courts are in use the balls are to be used in matched sets.

(d) The head of a mallet may be of any material provided the player gains no playing advantage over wood. The end-faces are to be parallel and have identical playing characteristics. Bevelled edges are not part of the end-faces. A mallet is not to be changed during a game, unless it has suffered damage affecting its use in the game, and if so changed may not be used again in that game.

(e) The dimensions given above may vary slightly, provided the equipment remains fit to play.

4. Accessories

The following accessories may be supplied for guidance, convenience and decoration. Any accessory impeding a player may be removed temporarily.

(a) Corner flags coloured blue, red, black and yellow may be placed in corners I, II, III and IV respectively. They are to be mounted on posts about 12 inches (305 mm) high, either up to 12 inches (305 mm) outside the court, or touching the boundary but not intruding into the court.

(b) A check fence high enough to arrest the progress of balls may be placed around the boundary and about 11/2 yards (1.4 metres) outside it.

(c) White pegs, sufficiently prominent to be seen across the court, may be placed on or up to 12 inches (305 mm) outside the boundary to mark the ends of the halfway lines.

(d) Two sets of clips may be provided to record the scoring of hoops. One set is to be blue or black and the other red or yellow (or other colours if alternative balls are used). The appropriate colour clip may be attached to a hoop by the side scoring that hoop.

(e) Where alternative colours are used regularly, a post displaying their colour sequence may be located just off the court, or the peg may be modified to show all colours.

5. The Start

(a) The side which wins the toss plays first with the blue ball.

(b) All balls are initially played from a position on the court within a yard (914 mm) of corner IV.

(c) When a match consists of more than one game, the players retain the same balls and the loser starts the next game with either ball of the side.

Note

Council has agreed that, for specific events in the CA Calendar, a trial version of the Wrong Ball Law (Law 11) will be used. In other CA listed events the use of the trial law will be optional. Each Federation will determine when the trial law is to be used in Federation events.

International Ruling

5.1 A game starts when a player strikes or attempts to strike a ball with the intention of starting the game.

5.2 Balls are outside agencies until they are played into the game in accordance with law 5. If it is noticed that a wrong ball has been played before all four balls have been played into the game, the game reverts to its state after the last turn played correctly in sequence.

5.3 If the striker commits a non-striking fault before the ball is played in one of the first four turns of the game, the ball remains an outside agency until it is played from the starting area in a later turn.

5.4 If the striker commits a striking fault in one of the first four turns, the ball has been played into the game irrespective of whether the opponent chooses to leave it where it stopped or to have it replaced in the position it occupied in the starting area before the fault was committed.

6. The Turn

(a) Each turn consists of a single stroke and its consequences, ending when all balls moved in the turn have stopped moving or have left the court. A stroke is played when the striker strikes the striker's ball with a mallet. The accidental touching of a ball with the mallet by the striker while preparing to play a stroke counts as a stroke (or a fault).

(b) A player may not deem a stroke to have been played.

(c) An attempt to strike a ball which fails to touch it (an "air swing") is not a stroke or a fault and unless a non-striking fault is committed the player is still the striker.

(d) As a result of a stroke the striker's ball may run a hoop in order and score a point, or points if two hoops are run in order, or may cause other balls to move and score a point or points.

(e) A ball leaves the court and becomes an outside agency if more than half of it crosses the boundary. It remains an outside agency until it is next played. Unless it is directed to be moved as an offside ball it is played from the point where it crossed the boundary. A player may request that a ball off the court be placed on the boundary, or that the position be marked, before any turn. The referee or in the absence of a referee the ball's owner is to determine the spot where the ball is placed. C6.1

(f) If a ball cannot be placed on the boundary because of the presence of another ball, it is to be placed after the other ball has been played. However, if the ball to be placed will be played before the other ball, it is placed on the boundary in contact with the other ball as near as possible to where it would otherwise be placed.

(g) If a ball placed on the boundary obstructs the playing of another ball, it is temporarily removed.

(h) If a ball moves after its position has been agreed, it is to be returned to the agreed position. The position of the ball is agreed if the next player has played or if the position of the ball has been agreed by a referee or the players.

International Ruling

6.1 If a player whilst preparing to strike a ball, makes accidental contact with another ball, not the striker's ball, and before making contact with the ball he intends to strike, the accidental contact is a non- striking fault and not the playing of a wrong ball.

7. Scoring a Point

(a) A ball scores a point by passing through the correct hoop in the order and direction shown in Diagram 1. This is known as running a hoop. If a ball first enters its hoop in order in the direction opposite to that shown in Diagram 1, it cannot score the point for itself in the same turn. If it has so entered, it cannot score the point in a subsequent turn unless it stops in a position in which it has not started to run the hoop.

Running a hoop

(b) Running a hoop is illustrated in Diagram 2. The ball starts to run a hoop as soon as the front of the ball breaks the plane of the non-playing side of the hoop. It completes the running if it stops clear of the plane of the playing side.

(c) A ball may run a hoop in one or more turns.

(d) If a stroke causes more than one ball to run the hoop, the ball nearest the hoop before the stroke scores the point.

(e) If a ball jams in a hoop in contact with both uprights, the hoop is to be adjusted, or if the ball is too large it is to be replaced. The player who played the turn in which the ball became jammed then chooses to replace any balls moved and replay the turn or to have the balls left as they finished with the ball in the jaws of the hoop.

CA Ruling

Law 7(e): The words "it is to be replaced" at the end of the first sentence are to be interpreted as if they read "the ball is to be exchanged for one of correct size" and Law 7(e) is to be interpreted as if the following sentence were added at the end of the Law:

"If the player chooses to have the balls left as they finished, the ball that jammed in the hoop is to be placed half-way through the hoop."

8. Advice

(a) In doubles play, players may advise their partners and assist in the playing of a stroke by indicating the direction in which the mallet should be swung. However, when the stroke is actually played, the partner is to stand well clear of the striker or any position which might assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of the stroke.

(b) If asked, a player is to tell an opponent the score, which hoop is next in order, which ball is to play, and how any ball over the halfway line reached its position

International Ruling

8.1 If a player acts on incorrect information given by the opponent and it is discovered before that player plays the same ball again, the player shall have the choice of a replay or allowing the play to stand, including any points scored in order.

9. Interference

(a) Loose impediments on the court may be removed. Examples include worm casts, twigs, leaves, nuts, refuse and similar material.

(b) The striker is entitled to relief from damage on the court, which is not a normal feature of that particular court nor is a consequence of ball damage, if in the opinion of both players or a referee it affects play. The damage is to be repaired if possible. If this is impractical the balls may be moved so as to give the striker no advantage. A ball so moved but not affected by the stroke is to be replaced after the turn has ended.

(c) Where a fixed obstacle outside the court interferes with a striker's swing or where the ground levels outside the boundary prevent the striker from adopting a level stance, the striker, with the consent of the opponent or referee, may move the ball to a point on the line connecting the point where the ball lay and the striker's intended target. The ball may be moved only the minimum distance to avoid the obstruction or uneven ground. If other balls lie within a yard (914 mm) of the original position of the striker's ball and are likely to interfere with the passage of the striker's ball, they are to be moved an equal distance into the court, parallel to the line of play, before the stroke is played, so that their relative positions remain the same. If such balls are not disturbed by the striker's ball, they are to be replaced after the turn has ended.

(d) An outside agency is any agency unconnected with the game. Examples include animals, spectators, a referee other than the players, the players or equipment from another game, accessories, a ball off the court or a ball directed to be played from a penalty spot and other stray objects. Neither loose impediments nor weather are outside agencies. C9.1

(e) If an outside agency or weather moves a stationary ball, it is to be replaced before the next stroke.

(f) If an outside agency interferes with a moving ball during a turn while the outcome of the stroke is still in doubt, any balls moved by the stroke are to be replaced and the stroke is to be replayed. If the outcome of the stroke is not in doubt, the ball that suffered interference is to be placed where it would otherwise have stopped.

(g) After interference a moving ball cannot cause a stationary ball to move and any such ball is to be replaced.

(h) No point may be scored for any ball through interference.

International Ruling

9.1 When two sides play simultaneously or nearly simultaneously, so that two balls are in motion at the same time, the striker is deemed to have played first irrespective of the actual order in which the two strokes were played and the other side commits a non-striking fault If the commission of the fault affects the outcome of the striker's play, the striker may choose to have all balls affected by the fault replaced in the positions they occupied before either stroke was played and to replay the turn. If the striker's ball runs a hoop in order or causes another ball so to do after being affected by the fault, the striker may choose to waive the fault and score the point and, in that case, the other side does not lose its next turn.

9.2 When both players of a side play simultaneously or nearly simultaneously so that two balls are in motion at the same time the striker's play stands and the partner has committed a non striking fault. No replay is permitted.

9.3 Scoring clips, whether on the ground or on a hoop, are outside agencies (Law 9(d)). As such they should be removed before a stroke is played if the ball is likely to hit the clip. If the clip is not removed and the ball does hit it then the ball stays where it has stopped, there is no replay, and no point is scored in that turn.
If a clip which is dropped after the striker has played, is hit by a moving ball then Rule 9(f) applies.
If an outside agency, other than a scoring clip, is in place before a stroke is played, and the outside agency is hit by a moving ball, then Rule 9(f) does not apply. The opponent has the choice of leaving the moving ball where it stopped or of placing it where the opponent felt it would have stopped if there had been no interference. In particular no replay is permitted.

10. The Halfway Law

(a) Between a hoop just scored and the next hoop in order there is a line called the halfway line. The halfway lines for each hoop are shown in Diagram 3 as follows:

Half Way lines

When the next hoop in order is The Halfway Line is
7 & 17 A-F
3, 9 & 15 B-G
5 & 11 C-H
All Others D-E

(b) At the end of a turn in which a hoop point was scored, any ball which is resting beyond the halfway line for the next hoop in order is an offside ball unless it reached its position as a result of:

(1) the stroke just played; or

(2) a stroke, wrong ball play or fault played or committed by an opponent, or

(3) contact with an opponent's ball; or

(4) being directed to a penalty spot.

(c)

(1) Before the next stroke is played, the opponent of the owner of an offside ball is entitled to direct that the offside ball is next to be played either from where it lies or from either penalty spot D or E in Diagram 3 as chosen by the opponent. A ball that is directed to be played from a penalty spot is an outside agency until it is played. C10.1

(2) If the owner of an offside ball plays before the opponent has given a direction under Law 10(c)(1) and before the opponent has played, the opponent may require the stroke to be replayed after Law 10(c)(1) is applied. Before the stroke is replayed any balls moved by the first stroke are replaced. A player required to replay a ball under this Law, is no longer entitled to rule on an opponent's offside ball at the same hoop.

CA Ruling

Law 10(c)(2) is to be interpreted as if playing before the opponent has given a direction includes playing without acknowledging or acting on a direction given in a manner capable of conveying its meaning to a player with normal hearing.

International Ruling

10.1 The exemption under Law 10(b)(2) shall not apply to a ball whose owner misses a turn in that position because of a non-striking fault.

10.2 The exemption under Law 10(b)(3) does not result from a ball being played away from an opponent ball with which it was in contact

10.3 Reference to the play of the owner of an offside ball in Rule 10(c)(2), includes play by the partner in a doubles game and play of either of the owner's balls in a singles game.

11. Playing a Wrong Ball C11.1

(a) If the striker plays any ball other than the striker's ball or any player other than the striker plays any ball as though it were that player's turn, a wrong ball has been played.

(b)

(1) In a singles game, if the striker plays the partner ball the opponent or the referee should stop play before the next turn. No points are scored and any balls moved are replaced and the striker then plays the correct ball To avoid delay the opponent or the referee should stop play if the striker is about to play the partner ball to allow the correct ball to be played.

(2) In a singles game, if the striker commits the equivalent of a striking fault while playing the partner ball, the striker's turn ends without a replay. In this case the opponent chooses whether the balls remain where they stop or are replaced where they were before the turn. No points are scored and as the sequence has been broken the opponent may play either ball of the side.

(3) In all other cases of wrong ball play, if play is stopped before the opponent has played, the opponent chooses whether to leave any balls moved where they stop, or to have all balls moved replaced where they were before the wrong ball was played. No points are scored, and as the sequence of play has been broken the opponent may play either ball of the side. Neither a referee nor an opponent should stop play before a wrong ball is played, except when a partner ball is played in singles.

(c) If a wrong ball is played but play is not stopped before the opponent has played, there is no remedy and any points scored for any ball are scored for the owner of the ball. Then:

(1) In a singles match play continues until a wrong ball play is identified, when Law 11(b) is applied, or

(2) In a doubles match, if the opponent played the stroke with a ball the opponent is permitted to play under Law 1(a), play continues in the sequence following that ball. If the opponent played with a ball they are not permitted to play under Law 1(a) then a wrong ball has been played, and Law 11(b)(3) is applied.

CA Ruling

Law 11 is to be interpreted as if the following sub-law (d) were added.

If a side plays a wrong ball and then immediately plays one or more turns before the other side has played a turn or committed a non-striking fault and play is then stopped, no points are scored in any of those turns and the non-offending side chooses whether the balls remain where they stopped or are replaced where they were before the start of any of those turns. The non-offending side may then play either ball of the side.

Note

Council has agreed that, for specific events in the CA Calendar, a trial version of the Wrong Ball Law (Law 11) will be used. In other CA listed events the use of the trial law will be optional. Each Federation will determine when the trial law is to be used in Federation events.

NOTE: Many players have questioned the rather complex nature of this law and we must agree that it can be extremely difficult to interpret. To overcome these problems, we have developed a one-page document entitled The Idiot's Guide to the Wrong Ball Law, which is now used in training all new GC Referees, both in the UK and Australia, and has been used successfully by many clubs in the UK. It asks a small number of simple questions and gives the answer to each. Download a copy and pin it to your club's notice board.

12. Non-Striking Faults

(a) A non-striking fault is committed if a moving ball touches any part of a player, or the player`s mallet or clothing, or a player touches, moves or shakes a stationary ball, with any part of the body, clothes or mallet either directly or by hitting a hoop or the peg, except when:

(i) the striker touches the striker`s ball with the mallet when playing a stroke, or C12.1

(ii) a player touches a ball in accordance with these Laws or marks or cleans it with the permission of the opponent or referee, or

(iii) a player plays a wrong ball, or

(iv) the ball is an outside agency.

(b) A non-striking fault is also committed if a player causes damage to the court that, before it is repaired, is capable of affecting a subsequent stroke played over the damaged area, except when the striker commits a striking fault.

(c) Action after a non-striking fault:

(1) If a non-striking fault affects one or more stationary balls, the opponent chooses whether to leave them where they stop or to have them all replaced where they were before the fault was committed.

(2) If a non-striking fault affects a moving ball, the opponent chooses whether to leave the ball and any other balls moved where they stop, or to have the moving ball placed where it would have stopped and all other balls moved replaced where they were before the fault was committed. However, if the outcome of the stroke was in doubt when a non-striking fault committed by the striker's opponent occurred, the stroke is to be played again.

CA Ruling

The expression "all other balls moved replaced..." shall be interpreted as if it read "all other balls moved as a result of the fault replaced...".

(3) No points may be scored by any ball by a non-striking fault.

(4) The side that commits the non-striking fault loses its next turn. Should a non-striking fault be committed by the striker's side, before the striker's turn is played, then the turn lost is the current turn.

CA Ruling

Law 12(c)(4) is to be interpreted as if the following sentence were added at the end of the Law:

"When a side loses its next turn, it is deemed to have been played with the ball of the side which would have followed the ball played immediately before the turn to be lost. If the side would have been entitled to play either ball of the side under Law 11(b)(2) or (3), it must nominate which ball is deemed to have been played."

(5) If a non-striking fault is committed but play is not stopped before the opponent has played a stroke there is no remedy, and play continues as if the fault had not been committed.

CA Ruling C12.2

Law 12(c)(5) is to be interpreted as if it began with the words "Subject to Law 12(c)(3),".

International Ruling

12.1 The provisions of clause 12(b) shall not apply to a striker during the period between when the striker's mallet makes first contact with the striker's ball and when the striker leaves his stance under control

13. Striking Faults

(a) A striking fault can only be committed from the time the striker's ball is struck by the mallet until the striker leaves the stance under control. It is a fault if, in striking, the striker:

(1) touches the head of the mallet with a hand;

(2) rests the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm on the ground or an outside agency;

(3) rests the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm directly connected with the stroke against any part of the legs or feet;

(4) causes the mallet to strike the striker's ball by kicking, hitting, dropping or throwing the mallet;

(5) strikes the striker's ball with any part of the mallet other than an end-face, either (i) deliberately; or (ii) accidentally in a stroke which requires special care because of the proximity of a hoop or the peg or another ball;

(6) "double taps" the striker's ball by striking it more than once in the same stroke or allows the striker's ball to retouch the mallet; C13.1

(7) causes the striker's ball to touch a hoop or the peg while still in contact with the mallet;

(8) causes the striker's ball while still in contact with the mallet, to touch another ball, unless the balls were in contact before the stroke;

(9) strikes the striker's ball when it lies in contact with a hoop or the peg otherwise than in a direction away therefrom;

(10) maintains contact with the striker's ball by pushing or pulling the ball with the mallet;

(11) touches a ball other than the striker's ball with the mallet;

(12) touches a ball with any part of the body or clothes;

(13) plays before the previous turn ends;

(14) plays any stroke in which the mallet causes damage to the court that, before it is repaired, is capable of affecting a subsequent turn played over the damaged area.

(b) Action after a striking fault:

(1) If the fault is noticed before the opponent has played a stroke the opponent chooses whether the balls remain where they stop after the fault or are replaced in the positions they occupied before the fault was committed. In either case no point is scored for any ball.

(2) Otherwise there is no remedy, and play continues as if the fault had not been committed.

(3) If a player commits a non-striking fault on a ball that is still moving after a striking fault has been committed by the other side, any balls moved are to be replaced where they were before the striking fault was committed and the side that committed the non-striking fault loses its next turn.

CA Ruling

Law 13(b)(3) is to be interpreted as if the words "in accordance with Law 12(c)(4)" were added to the end of the final sentence.

14. Etiquette

(a) Players are responsible for maintaining good standards of behaviour towards other players, equipment, courts and spectators. Examples of unacceptable behaviour that players are expected to avoid are:

(1) Leaves the vicinity of the court without permission from the opponent, referee or the manager.

(2) Offers tactical advice to anyone other than their partner.

(3) Abuses their mallet or other equipment

(4) Disturbs other players during the match.

(5) Interrupts the striker by standing or moving in front of the striker or otherwise, except as permitted or required by the laws.

(6) Argues aggressively or continuously with or is aggressive towards an opponent.

(7) Deliberately or repeatedly plays the partner ball.

CA Ruling

The principle underlying Law 14(a)(7) extends to the deliberate or repeated playing of an opponent's ball.

(8) Fails to play with reasonable dispatch. Players are not to waste time.

(9) Plays after the opponent has clearly asked that play be stopped to enable an action to be investigated or a ball to be placed.

(10) Uses a mark or marker to assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of a stroke.

(11) Except with the permission of an opponent or referee attempts to perform a test to determine whether a point has been scored.

(12) Provides wrong information to an opponent when asked in accordance with Law 8(b).

(13) Fails to accept a decision of a referee on a matter of fact or shows lack of respect for a referee.

(14) Acts in such a manner that may bring the game into disrepute.

(b) When a referee is in charge of a match and a player behaves in any of the unacceptable ways the referee is to warn them not to do so again. If the behaviour is repeated the referee is to repeat the warning and the next player on the offending side loses their turn. If the behaviour is repeated again the referee is to stop the match and the match is awarded to the opposing side. In this case the score in the game in progress is recorded as the winning total (4, 7 or 10) to the winner and the score already recorded by the loser when the game is stopped. Any subsequent games in the match are won to zero.

(c) In the absence of a referee the players are responsible for monitoring behaviour during a match. If a player behaves in any of the unacceptable ways the opponent is to draw attention to the behaviour and issue a warning not to do so again. If the warning is disputed a referee or manager should be called. If the behaviour is repeated after a warning the actions given in Law 14(b) are to be followed.

15. Refereeing

(a) The players in all matches are responsible for the fair and correct application of these Laws. A referee may be placed in charge of a match, or may be called on to assist, or may in specific instances intervene to ensure the match proceeds according to these Laws. The presence or absence of a referee does not change the obligation on a player to follow fair and correct play. Players are to warn the other side before playing strokes that may produce a fault or that are forceful. Both sides are responsible for keeping the score, the striker (or referee) announcing it after each point is scored. In the absence of a referee, if there is a difference of opinion on a matter of fact, the opinion of the player with the best view is to be preferred, but if two views are equal, the striker's opinion prevails.

(b) A qualified referee or other suitably experienced person may be called upon in one of the following capacities.

(1) A Referee in Charge is a referee who is appointed by the Tournament Referee to take full charge of a match. Such a referee is to supervise all aspects of the match from taking the toss, starting actual play, maintaining the score, ensuring the match is played in accordance with these Laws and resolving any disputes that might arise. A Referee in Charge is also to ensure that any published regulations for a particular tournament that relate to the playing of the match are fully complied with. If requested, a Referee in Charge is to give players information about the progress of the game or an explanation of a Law, but is not to give advice to any player that is likely to assist the player in any way. A Referee in Charge is not to distract the players or to interfere with play, except to deal with breaches of the Laws, but should be suitably placed to verify the scoring of a point or the fairness of a stroke. A Referee in Charge is not to initiate action under Law 10.

(2) A Referee on Call is a referee who is summoned by a player to watch a stroke. While present, a Referee on Call has the same duties as a Referee in Charge. A Referee on Call is to first establish why the call was made and what the player intends to do, before taking an appropriate position to watch the stroke. Referees on Call are to remain on the court for the particular purpose requested and at their discretion thereafter. A request for a Referee on Call is not to be made if there is a Referee in Charge present.

(3) A Referee on Appeal is a referee who is asked by a player to give a decision on a matter of fact or about the Laws after an event has occurred. The referee's duties are the same as those of a Referee on Call. The matter is to be decided by observation or investigation or both. If the referee witnessed the event and need not investigate further, the players are to be so informed and the decision given. In other cases the referee is to decide the appeal after hearing both sides and, if necessary, other witnesses. If the referee observed something relevant the players are to be so informed. The decision is then to be given. In the last resort the referee may give a compromise decision. This may involve arbitrary adjustment of the score, which ball is next to play, the positions of the balls, the number of extra turns outstanding and the time remaining. The referee may decide that a game is to be restarted. Referees on Appeal are to remain on the court for the particular purpose requested and at their discretion thereafter. A Referee on Appeal is not to decide that a fault has been committed unless satisfied of the fact by personal observation or by the evidence of the offender or a Spectator Referee who personally observed the fault. A request for a Referee on Appeal is not to be made if there is a Referee in Charge present.

(4) A Spectator Referee is a referee who can only act when there is no Referee in Charge and whose powers and duties are confined to the following:

(i) To intervene to ensure that play is lawfully continued after a breach of the Laws is claimed or admitted.

(ii) To intervene if a player is heard giving erroneous information on the Laws or in response to a request under Law 8(b).

(iii) To intervene if a player is seen to claim a point when the hoop run is not the current hoop in order.

iv) To volunteer relevant information to a Referee on Appeal.

(v) To apply to the Tournament Referee to be appointed to a game.

(c) A player may appeal against a referee's application of the Laws but may not appeal against a referee's ruling on a matter of fact. Appeals are to be made to the Tournament Referee.

International Ruling

15.1 A referee should only intervene under Law 15(b)(4)(iii) if he is personally watching the game and is able to stop play immediately after the stroke in which a hoop is incorrectly run.

16. Handicaps

(a) Handicap games may be played to allow players of different abilities to compete so that they will have more equal chances of success. Laws 1 to 15 above apply except as indicated in this Law. Each player is allotted a handicap according to ability, ranging from 0 for the strongest players up to 12 for the weakest players.

(b) In singles the weaker player is allowed a number of extra turns equal to the difference between the players' handicaps for 13-Point games and as shown in the table for 7- and 19-point games.

Extra Turns Allowed in Handicap Games

Handicap Difference 19-Point Game 13-Point Game 7-Point Game
0 0 0 0
1 2 1 1
2 3 2 1
3 5 3 2
4 6 4 2
5 8 5 3
6 9 6 3
7 10 7 4
8 12 8 4
9 13 9 5
10 15 10 5
11 17 11 6
12 19 12 7

(c) In doubles extra turns are given to a player not a side. The number given by the lower-handicapped player in one side to the lower-handicapped player in the other side is shown in the table after finding half the difference between their handicaps with any fraction rounded up to the next whole number. The same procedure applies to the higher-handicapped players in each side.

(d) No point may be scored for the striker's side in an extra turn.

(e) An extra turn may only be played by a striker at the end of that striker's turn and is to be played with the same ball. A striker may play an extra turn at any stage in the game, and, if receiving more than one, may play extra turns in succession.

(f) At the end of a turn a striker intending to take an extra turn is to give a clear indication of the intention and stop the opponent from playing. When a striker decides to play an extra turn after committing a striking fault, Law 13(b)(1) does not apply and the balls are replaced in the positions they occupied before the fault was committed. A striker who is entitled to play an extra turn and indicates an intention to do so may revoke that decision at any time before playing the stroke, unless the balls have been replaced after a striking fault. The striker's intention not to play an extra turn shall be indicated clearly. A striker who has indicated that an extra turn will not be played is not permitted to change that decision.

(g) An extra turn may not be taken in place of a turn missed because of a non-striking fault or the playing of a wrong ball. If such an extra turn is played and play is stopped before the opponent plays then any balls moved are replaced, the opponent then plays and the right to the extra turn is restored to the owner. However, if such an extra turn is played, and the opponent then plays before play is stopped, the extra turn stands as valid play

(h) The administration of the handicap system is the responsibility of each national croquet association.

 

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